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Swampscott 

Massachusetts 




Annual Town Report 

July 1, 2006 to June 30, 2007 



One Hundred and Fifty Fifth 
Annual Report 
Of The Town Officers 



Swampscott 
Massachusetts 



For the period of July 1, 2006 through June 30, 2007 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Swampscott was incorporated as 

Situated: 

Population: 

Area: 

Assessed Valuation: 
Tax Rate: 

Form of Government: 

Governor: 

Attorney General: 

Secretary of the Commonwealth: 

State Legislative Body: 

United States Congress: 

Governor's Council: 
Qualifications of Voters: 



Registration: 



Where to Vote: 



Tax Bills: 



a town on May 21, 1852 

About 15 miles northeast of Boston 

State Census 2000 - 14,412. Persons of all ages are counted 
every year in Town Census. 

3.5 square miles 

$2,609,458,933 

$12.86 Residential and Open Space 
$23.74 Commercial, Industrial, Personal 

Representative Town Meeting 

Elihu Thomson Administration Building 

22 Monument Avenue 

Swampscott, Massachusetts 01907 

Deval Patrick 

Martha Coakley 

William Francis Galvin 

Representing Swampscott: 

Senator Thomas Magee of Lynn (3''^ Essex and Middlesex ) 
' Representative Lori A. Ehrlich (8* Essex District) 

Senator Edward Kennedy 
Senator John Kerry 

Representative John Tiemey (6"' Congressional District) 

Mary-Ellen Maiming (5* District) 

Must be 1 8 years, bom in the United States or fully 
naturalized in accordance with the provisions in Ch. 587, Acts 
of 1972 and CH. 853, Acts of 1973. There is no resident 
duration requirement for "who is a resident in the city or town 
where he claims the right to vote at the time he registers' may 
register. 

Monday through Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Friday 8:00 
a.m. to 12:00 p.m. These hours are subject to change. Special 
hours are help preceding and election. 

Precmcts 1 and 2 -Clarke School, Norfolk Avenue 
Precincts 3 and 4 -First Congregational, Monument Avenue 
Precincts 5 and 6 - Swampscott Middle School, Forest Avenue 

Property Taxes are assessed on a fiscal year basis, which 
begins on July 1 and ends on June 30. Payments are due 
quarterly on August 1 , November 1 , February 1 and May 1 . 



1 



2007 
Elected Officials 



OFFICE TERIVI 
MODERATOR 

Martin Goldman 2008 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Adam P Forman 2009 

Jill Sullivan 2008 

Marc R. Paster 2008 

Eric Walker 2010 

Anthony A Scibelli 2010 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

John V. Phelan, III 2009 

William C. Sullivan III 2008 

Neil G. Sheehan 2010 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

David P Whelan, Jr 2009 

Dan Yaeger 2008 

Shelley Sackett 2008 

Neil S Bernstein 2010 

Joseph P Crimmins 2010 



TRUSTEE OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

John Karwowski 
Carl Reardon 
Joanne Vanderburg 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Nelson Kessler 
Martha Pitman MD 
Lawrence S Block MD 

PLANNING BOARD 

Bruce E Paradise 
John V. Phelan III 
Jill Sullivan 
Eugene Barden 
Jeffrey Blonder 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Albert DiLisio 
Barbara Eldridge 
James L. Hughes 
Patricia Krippendorf 

CONSTABLE 

Robert Donnelly 
Paul Minsky 
Stephen B. Simmons 



2009 
2008 
2010 



2009 
2008 
2010 



2011 
2010 
2009 
2008 
2012 



2011 
2010 
2009 
2008 



2010 
2010 
2010 



SERVICE TO THE TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 



On behalf of the citizens of Swampscott, The Board of Selectnnen and the Town 
Administrator would like to take this opportunity to express their appreciation to the many 
wonderful employees for their dedication and commitment in providing quality services to the 
Town, to wish those who have retired well in their future endeavors and to offer sincere 
condolences to the families and friends of those who have passed during the year. 

The Board and the Town Administrator would also like to express gratitude to those who 
have served and those who continue to serve on the various boards, committees and 
commissions. The Board and the Town Administrator recognize the time and the effort that is 
given to Town service and wish to thank you for your knowledge, support and interest in the 
Town. 



3 



DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE 



Somer, Margaret A. Chair 
Blonder, Jeffrey (Vice-Chair) 
Patrikis, Ted 

Regular Members 

Baker, Edythe* 
Baker, Robert * 
Belkin, Herbert 
Bonazzoli, Paula 

Cassidy, Reid 
DeChillo, Mary 
DiPesa, Ralph (Skip) 
Frenkel, Lenore 

Frenkel, Rich 
Fridman, Nanette 

Green, John 
Green, Collette 

Halbert, Kurt 

Hart, Anthony 
Huber, Richard 
Kaufinan, Nancy 
Kearney, Sheila 

Maloney, John 
Mauriello, Chris 
Moynihan, John 

Mulgay, Mark 
Munnelly, Dan 

Paster, Marc 

Phelan, John 
Rosenthal, Burt 

Shanahan, Bill 
Shutzer, Carole 
Smith, Jim* 
Sneierson, William 

Watson, Brian 

Young, Gary 

Young, Mona 

Associate Members 
Diamant, Dan 
DiPesa, Cheryl 
Kahnan, Ed 
Petersen, Rep. Doug 
Richmond, David 
Richmond, Marcia 
Smullin, Alix 
Weiss, Gerdy 
Whalen, Barbara 



'denotes Lifetime 



4 



REPUBLICAN COMMITTEE 



Baker, Charles 
Barr Sam 
Brockelman, John 
Butters, Joy E 
Butters, John 
Butters, Bryan 
Chesley, Bruce R 

Debole, Paul 
Goudreau, Connie 
Inglis, Jane 
Leger, Jeanne 
Mancini, Francis A 
McGrath, Kevin M 

Minsky, Paul 
Palleschi, Arthur J 
Palleschi, Edward 
Perry, Frank H Jr 
Perry, Michele E 
Perry, Robert E 
Perry Marilyn A 
Sinatra, Joseph 
Sinatra, Beverly 
Tennant, Alexander 
Withrow, Mary Susan 
Withrow, Robert 
Wood, Mike 

Associate Member 
Bargoot, Joyce 



5 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 



During Fiscal 2007 The Board of Selectmen and the Town Administrator, along with a 
dedicated and professional staff, continued to work diligently on improving service delivery to 
residents and tjusiness owners of the Town of Swampscott. 

In July 2006, State Representative Douglas Petersen and Sate Senator Thomas McGee 
outlined for the Board of Selectmen and residents the additional state funding that the Town will 
receive in the upcoming fiscal year. In addition to the annual state aid amounts $250,000 was 
approved for infrastructure improvements to Essex Street and $100,000 was earmarked for 
resurfacing a portion of Paradise Road. They also indicated that the Town would receive 
$187,380 from the state in Chapter 90 funding. 

On August 21 , 2006, Selectmen Charlie Baker reported to the Board that after several 
months of negotiations he and the Town Administrator Andrew Maylor had reached agreement on 
a contract extension for Mr. Maylor. As a result, the Board of Selectmen voted unanimously on a 
motion made by Selectmen Baker to extend the contract of Town Administrator Andrew Maylor 
from July 1 , 2006 to December 31 , 2009. Mr. Maylor's original five year contract was due to 
expire on October 6, 2007. 

In September 2006, the Board of Selectmen held a public hearing regarding a request for 
a liquor license by Mr. Joseph Leone, who wants to construct a restaurant at 410 Humphrey 
Street. An attorney representing several of the abutters voiced concerns regarding the request. 
The applicant's attorney spoke on behalf of the license request. At the conclusion of the public 
hearing the selectmen voted unanimously to approve the request for the liquor license. 

On November 20, 2006, the Board of Selectmen convened a public hearing for the 
purpose of ascertaining the desire of the community for a second cable franchise provider. The 
hearing was a result of a license request made by Verizon of New England. Mr. Peter Boldman 
and Mr. Jim McGrail spoke on behalf of the applicant. Resident Ed Robinson, Herb Belkin and 
Jim Smith spoke in favor of granting a license to Verizon. After the public hearing was closed, the 
Board of Selectmen voted unanimously to grant a fifteen year cable franchise license to Verizon. 

On January 31 , 2007, the Board of Selectmen voted unanimously to support a 
recommendation made by the Town Administrator to appoint Marilyn Hurwitz of Swampscott to 
the position of interim Director of the Council on Aging. At the same meeting, the Board 
discussed drafting a "brown bag" liquor license policy for businesses with less than fifty (50) 
seats. They agreed to continue their discussion at a future meeting. 

In February 2007, the Board of Selectmen voted to officially name the intersection of 
Essex Street at Stetson Avenue as "Captain Jennifer J. Harris Square", in honor of the 
Swampscott resident killed in action in Iraq. The Town Administrator presented his Fiscal 2008 
budget to the selectmen at their February 28, 2007 meeting. The selectmen asked several 
questions before adopting the budget by unanimous vote. 

In March 2007, the Board of Selectmen met in joint session with the Finance Committee 
and the School Committee to discuss the Fiscal 2008 budget. Superintendent Matthew Malone 
presented the different scenarios available to the school department, including the closure of the 
Machon Elementary School, and there was discussion between the various boards about the 
positives and negatives of each scenario. At their March 28, 2007 meeting, the Board of 
Selectmen voted to permanently appoint Marilyn Hurwitz as the Director of the Council on Aging 
and also appointed Rod Pickard as the Assistant Director. 

On April 2, 2007, the Board of Selectmen voted to adopt a "brown bag" liquor license 
policy. The new policy, which had first been discussed at a meeting January, outlines the 
requirements restaurants must follow in order for the Board of Selectmen to grant them a "brown 
bag" liquor license. At their meeting of April 11, 2007, Selectmen Forman, Cassidy and Paster 
recognized Selectmen Baker and Santanello, who were attending their last meeting, for their 
dedication and service to the town. Selectman Santanello was specifically recognized for the 
eighteen (18) years that he served as a member of the Board of Selectmen. At their 
organizational meeting in April 2007, the selectmen voted to appoint Adam Forman as chairman 
and Tony Scibelli as vice chairman of the Board of Selectmen. 



6 



In June 2007, the Board of Selectmen voted to set the water and sewer rates for Fiscal 
2008 at $5.22 and 3.65 respectively. Chairman Forman announced the resignation of Selectman 
Cassldy. On June 20, 2007, the Board defeated a motion (two In favor, two opposed) 
recommending that a special election be held to fill the vacancy left by the resignation of 
Selectman Cassldy. At the same meeting the Board voted, after the close of a public hearing, to 
approve an Earth Removal Permit request made by Aggregate Industries for the Fiscal 2008. 

The Board and the Town Administrator would like to take this opportunity to express 
heartfelt gratitude to all those individuals who have taken time away from their families and 
friends to serve on the many committees, commissions and boards that provide a positive future 
for the Town. The Board and the Town Administrator are grateful for the depth of skill and 
experiences that each individual brings to these committees. We would also like to recognize 
Administrative Assistant, Maureen Gilhooley for her continued devotion to serving the public and 
assisting the Town Administrator and the Board. 

It is both an honor and a privilege to serve the Town as members of the Board of 
Selectmen and we appreciate the opportunity you have given each of us to do so. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Adam P. Forman, Chairman 
Anthony Scibelli, Vice Chairman 
Reid J. Cassldy 
Marc R. Paster 
Eric Walker 



7 



TOWN CLERK 



Official Town Statistics 
July 1, 2006 to June 30, 2007 



Births: 145 

Deaths: 229 

Marriages: 44 

Oath of Office Administered to Town Officials: 1 54 
Resignations of Town Officials Accepted & Processed: 9 

Certificates of Business (DBA) Issued & Processed: 79 

Gas Storage (Flammables) renewal Permits Issued: 10 

Dog Licenses Issued: 862 



Board of Registrars 

Russell Patten 
Susan Burgess 
Paul Debole 
Margaret Somer 



8 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 
SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

ss. 

To either of the Constables, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said 
town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at 

Precinct 1 Clarke School Precinct 2 Clarke School 

Norfolk Avenue Norfolk Avenue 

Precinct 3 First Church at the Monument Precinct 4 First Church at the Monument 

Monument Avenue Monument Avenue 

Precinct 5 Swampscott High School Precinct 6 Swampscott High School 

Forest Avenue Forest Avenue 

on TUESDAY, THE NINETEENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2006, from 7:00 A M to 8:00 P.M for the 
following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of political parties for the followmg offices: 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

GOVERNOR. FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

TREASURER FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

AUDITOR FOR THIS COMMONAVEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS SIXTH DISTRICT 

COUNCILLOR FIFTH DISTRICT 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT THIRD ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT EIGHTH DISTRICT 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY EASTERN DISTRICT 

CLERK OF COURTS ESSEX DISTRICT 

REGISTER OF DEEDS ESSEX SOUTHERN 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said voting. 

Given under our hands this 7* day of August, 2006. 



Selectmen of Swampscott 



,2006 



Constable 



Month and day 



9 







TOTAL TOWN TALLY SHEET 














SWAMPSCOTT 






TOTAL VOTES CAST 


2847 






19-Sep-06 
















DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY 










































PRECINCT 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


TOTAL 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
















BLANKS 


75 


72 


77 


113 


86 


91 


514 


EDWARD M KENNEDY 


429 


318 


356 


437 


342 


424 


2306 


WRITE-INS 


3 


4 


5 


6 


6 


3 


27 


TOTALS 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 


















GOVENOR 
















BLANKS 


1 


5 


4 


1 


3 


2 


16 


CHRISTOPHER F GABRIELI 


200 


152 


137 


154 


131 


188 


962 


DEVAL L PATRICK 


216 


165 


231 


299 


240 


264 


1415 


THOMAS F REILLY 


90 


71 


66 


101 


60 


64 


452 


WRITE-INS 





1 





1 








2 


TOTALS 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 


















LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 
















BLANKS 


24 


38 


22 


59 


36 


36 


215 


DEBORAH B GOLDBERG 


275 


149 


170 


184 


194 


259 


^ 


TIMOTHY P MURRAY 


113 


130 


139 


185 


111 


127 


80S 


ANDREA C SI LBERT 


95 


76 


107 


128 


93 


96 


595 


WRITE-INS 





1 














1 


TOTALS 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 


















ATTORNEY GENERAL 
















BLANKS 


130 


97 


107 


147 


131 


155 


767 


MARTHA COAKLEY 


376 


292 


330 


404 


302 


362 


2066 


WRITE-INS 


1 


5 


1 


5 


1 


1 


14 


TOTALS 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 


















SECRETARY OF STATE 
















BLANKS 


79 


62 


66 


99 


82 


99 


487 


WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 


362 


277 


297 


385 


295 


360 


1976 


JOHN BONIFAZ 


66 


55 


74 


72 


57 


59 


383 


WRITE-INS 








1 











1 


TOTALS 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 


















TREASURER 
















BLANKS 


126 


101 


109 


169 


150 


176 


831 


TIMOTHY P CAHILL 


381 


293 


329 


385 


283 


342 


2013 


WRITE-INS 











2 


1 





3 


TOTALS 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 


















AUDITOR 
















BLANKS 


147 


116 


135 


200 


158 


194 


950 


A. JOSEPH DENUCCI 


359 


275 


301 


353 


275 


324 


1887 


WRITE-INS 


1 


3 


2 


3 


1 





10 


TOTALS 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 



















10 



•ESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 


















96 


82 


84 


135 


99 


106 


602 


M F TIERNEY 


410 


309 


353 


418 


333 


412 


2235 




1 


3 


1 


3 


2 





10 




507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 


















NCILLOR 
















>JKS 


180 


141 


156 


227 


184 


221 


1109 


Y-ELLEN MANNING 


327 


252 


282 




327 


249 


296 


1733 


TE-INS 





1 





2 


1 


1 


5 


MS 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 


















^TOR IN GENERAL COURT 
















iKS 


132 


90 


112 


153 


128 


149 


764 


MAS M MCGEE 


375 


303 


325 


403 


304 


369 


2079 


TE-INS 





1 


1 





2 


Oj 4 


MS 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 






















■CINCT 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


b 


1 U 1 ALo 


















RESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
















iKS 


111 


94 


99 


153 


101 


lol 


coo 

009 


GLAS W PETERSEN 


394 


299 


338 


401 


331 


385 


04 AO 


TE-INS 


2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


10 


\LS 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 


1 
















RICT ATTORNEY 
















iKS 


146 


112 


131 


185 


151 


168 


893 


KTHAN W BLODGETT 


361 


282 


307 


368 


281 


350 


1949 


'E-INS 











3 


2 


n 
u 





U.S 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


ij 1 O 




















IK OF COURTS 
















IKS 


132 


110 


120 


176 


142 


1 0/ 


Q*JT 


MKS H DRISCOLL JR 


375 


282 


315 


378 


289 


001 


zUUU 


"E-INS 





2 


3 


2 


3 


n 
U 


10 


U.S 


507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 


















STER OF DEEDS 
















IKS 


148 


111 


128 


200 


155 


196 


938 


J L O'BRIEN JR 


359 


283 


310 


355 


279 


322 


1908 


E-INS 











1 








1 




507 


394 


438 


556 


434 


518 


2847 


















:als 






































































































































































































« 















TOTAL TOWN TALLY SHEET 














SWAMPSCOTT 






TOTAL VOTES CAST 


174 






19-Sep-06 
















REPUBLICAN PRIMARY 










































PRECINCT 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


TOTAL 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
















BLANKS 


4 


3 


4 


9 


4 


6 


30 


KENNETH G. CHASE 


11 


7 


7 


7 


2 


12 


46 


KEVIN P SCOTT 


20 


14 


16 


21 


11 


15 


97 


WRITE-INS 


1 

















1 


TOTALS 


36 


24 


27 


37 


17 


33 


174 


















GOVENOR 
















BLANKS 


2 


3 


4 


3 


3 


4 


19 


KERRY HEALEY 


31 


21 


23 


33 


14 


29 


151 


WRITE-INS 


3 








1 








4 


TOTALS 


36 


24 


27 


37 


17 


33 


174 


















LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 
















BLANKS 


9 


9 


8 


9 


9 


6 


50 


REED V. HILLMAN 


27 


15 


19 


28 


8 


27 


124 


WRITE-INS 























TOTALS 


36 


24 


27 


37 


17 


33 


174 


















ATTORNEY GENERAL 
















BLANKS 


6 


8 


11 


11 


5 


6 


47 


LARRY FRISOLI 


30 


16 


16 


26 


12 


27 


127 


WRITE-INS 























TOTALS 


36 


24 


27 


37 


17 


33 


174 


















SECRETARY OF STATE 
















BLANKS 


34 


24 


27 


37 


17 


32 


171 


WRITE-INS 


2 














1 


3 


TOTALS 


36 


24 


27 


37 


17 


33 


174 


















TREASURER 
















BLANKS 


34 


24 


27 


37 


17 


32 


171 


WRITE-INS 


2 














1 


3 


TOTALS 


36 


24 


27 


37 


17 


33 


174 


















AUDITOR 
















BLANKS 


34 


24 


27 


37 


17 


32 


171 


WRITE-INS 


2 














1 


3 


TOTALS 


36 


24 


27 


37 


17 


33 


174 



















12 



CINCTS 



ESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 



TOTALS 



KS 



12 



13 



i\RD W BARTON 



28 



18 



15 



24 



10 



26 



E-INS 



,LS 



36 



24 



27 



37 



17 



33 



ICILLOR 



KS 



34 



24 



26 



36 



17 



32 



E-INS 



LS 



36 



24 



27 



37 



17 



33 



TOR IN GENERALCOURT 



KS 



34 



24 



26 



37 



17 



32 



E-INS 



LS 



36 



24 



27 



37 



17 



33 



ESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 



KS 



34 



23 



27 



37 



17 



31 



E-INS 



LS 



36 



24 



27 



37 



17 



33 



IICT ATTORNEY 



KS 



34 



24 



26 



37 



17 



32 



E-INS 



LS 



36 



24 



27 



37 



17 



33 



K OF COURTS 



<S 



34 



24 



26 



37 



17 



32 



E-INS 



LS 



36 



24 



27 



37 



17 



33 



iTER OF DEEDS 

<S 

E-INS 

LS 



34 



36 



24 



24 



26 



27 



36 



37 



17 



17 



32 



33 



13 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 
SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 



SS. 11 
To either of the Constables of the Town of SWAMPSCOTT o 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are 
qualified to vote in State Election to vote at 

PRECINCT! CLARKE SCHOOL, NORFOLK AVE PRECINCT 2 CLARKE SCHOOL, NORFOLK AVE 

PRECINCTS FIRST CHURCH, MIDDLESEX AVE PRECINCT 4 FIRST CHURCH, MIDDLESEX AVE 

PRECINCT 5 SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL FOREST AVE PRECINCT 6 SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL FOREST A 



on TUESDAY, THE SEVENTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2006, from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following 
purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates for the following offices and questions: ||" 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

GOVERNOR/LT. GOVERNOR FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

TREASURER FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

AUDITOR FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS SIXTH DISTRICT 

COUNCILLOR FIFTH DISTRICT 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT THIRD ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT EIGHTH ESSEX DISTRICT 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY EASTERN DISTRICT 

CLERK OF COURTS ESSEX COUNTY 

REGISTER OF DEEDS ESSEX SOUTHERN DISTRICT 

QUESTION 1: Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives! 
before May 3, 2006? 
SUMMARY 

This proposed law would allow local licensing authorities to issue licenses for food stores to sell wine. The propose 
law defines a "food store" as a retail vendor, such as a grocery store, supermarket, shop, club, outlet, or warehouse-type 
seller, that sells food to consumers to be eaten elsewhere (which must include meat, poultry, dairy products, eggs, fresh 
fruit and produce, and other specified items), and that may sell other items usually found in grocery stores. Holders of 
licenses to sell wine at food stores could sell wine either on its own or together with any other items they sell. 
The licensing authorities in any city or town of up to 5000 residents could issue up to 5 licenses for food stores to sell 
wine. In cities or towns of over 5000 residents, one additional license could be issued for each additional 5000 residents] 
(or fraction of 5000). No person or business could hold more than 10% of the total number of the licenses that could be 
issued under the proposed law. Such licenses would not be counted when applying the laws that limit the number of oth 
kinds of alcoholic beverage licenses that may be issued or held. Any applicant for a license would have to be approved 1 
the state Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission, and any individual applicant would have to be at least 21 years old 
and not have been convicted of a felony. 

In issuing any licenses for food stores to sell wine, local licensing authorities would have to use the same procedures 
that apply to other licenses for the retail sale of alcoholic beverages. Except where the proposed law has different terms,; 
the same laws that apply to issuance, renewal, suspension and termination of licenses for retail sales of alcoholic 
beverages which are not to be consumed on the seller's premises, and that apply to the operations of holders of such 
licenses, would govern licenses to sell wine at food stores, and the operation of holders of such licenses. Local authoritit 



14 



Duld set fees for issuing and renewing such licenses. 

1 YES VOTE would create a new category of licenses for food stores to sell wine, and it would allow local licensing 
uthorities to issue such licenses. 

i( NO VOTE would make no change in the laws concerning the sale of wine. 
QUESTION 2: Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

)o you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives 

efore May 3, 2006? 

lUMMARY 

This proposed law would allow candidates for public office to be nominated by more than one political party or 
olitical designation, to have their names appear on the ballot once for each nomination, and to have their votes counted 
eparately for each nomination but then added together to determine the winner of the election. 

Tie proposed law would repeal an existing requirement that in order to appear on the state primary ballot as a candidate 
^ ar a political party's nomination for certain offices, a person cannot have been enrolled in any other party during the 
receding year. The requirement applies to candidates for nomination for statewide office, representative in Congress, 
pvemor's councillor, member of the state Legislature, district attorney, clerk of court, register of probate, register of 
eeds, county commissioner, sheriff, and county treasurer. The proposed law would also allow any person to appear on 
le primary ballot as a candidate for a party's nomination for those offices if the party's state committee gave its written 
onsent. The proposed law would also repeal the existing requirement that in order to be nominated to appear as an 
nenrolled candidate on the state election ballot, or on any city or town ballot following a primary, a person cannot have 
een enrolled in any political party during the 90 days before the deadline for filing nomination papers. 

The proposed law would provide that if a candidate were nominated by more than one party or political designation, 
istead of the candidate's name being printed on the ballot once, with the candidate allowed to choose the order in which 
le party or political designation names appear after the candidate's name, the candidate's name would appear multiple 
mes, once for each nomination received. The candidate would decide the order in which the party or political 
esignation nominations would appear, except that all parties would be listed before all political designations. The ballot 
^ould allow voters who vote for a candidate nominated by multiple parties or political designations to vote for that 
andidate under the party or political designation line of their choice. 

If a voter voted for the same candidate for the same office on multiple party or political designation lines, the ballot 
/ould remain valid but would be counted as a single vote for the candidate on a line without a party or political 
esignation. If voting technology allowed, voting machines would be required to prevent a voter from voting more than 

Iie number of times permitted for any one office. 
The proposed law would provide that if a candidate received votes under more than one party or political designation, 
le votes would be combined for purposes of determining whether the candidate had won the election. The total number 
f votes each candidate received under each party or political designation would be recorded. Election officials would 
tmounce and record both the aggregate totals and the total by party or political designation. 

The proposed law would allow a political party to obtain official recognition if its candidate had obtained at least 3% 
f the vote for any statewide office at either of the two most recent state elections, instead of at only the most recent state 
lection as under current law. 

The proposed law would allow a person nominated as a candidate for any state, city or town office to withdraw his 
ame from nomination within six days after any party's primary election for that office, whether or not the person sought 
omination or was nominated in that primary. Any candidate who withdrew from an election could not be listed on the 
lallot for that election, regardless of whether the candidate received multiple nominafions. 

The proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared invalid, the other parts would stay in effect. 
YES VOTE would allow a candidate for public office to be nominated for the same office by more than one political 
arty or political designation at the same election. 

NO VOTE would make no change in the laws concerning nomination of candidates for public office. 



lUESTION 3: Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

»o you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives 

efore May 3, 2006? 

UMMARY 

This proposed law would allow licensed and other authorized providers of child care in private homes under the 

2 

15 



state's subsidized child care system to bargain collectively with the relevant state agencies about all terms and condition 
of the provision of child care services under the state's child care assistance program and its regulations. 

Under the proposed law, these family child care providers who provide state-subsidized child care would not be 
considered public employees, but if 30% of the providers gave written authorization for an employee organization to be ^ 
their exclusive representative in collective bargaining, the state Labor Relations Commission would hold a secret mail 
ballot election on whether to certify that organization as the exclusive representative. Parts of the state's public employe 
labor relations law and regulations would apply to the election and collective bargaining processes. The proposed law 
would not authorize providers to engage in a strike or other refusal to deliver child care services. 

An exclusive representative, if certified, could then communicate with providers to develop and present a proposal t 
the state agencies conceming the terms and conditions of child care provider services. The proposed law would then 
require the parties to negotiate in good faith to try to reach a binding agreement. If the agreed-upon terms and condition 
required changes in existing regulations, the state agencies could not finally agree to the terms until they completed the 
required procedures for changing regulations and any cost items agreed to by the parties had been approved by the state 
Legislature. If any actions taken under the proposed law required spending state funds, that spending would be subject t 
appropriation by the Legislature. Any complaint that one of the parties was refusing to negotiate in good faith could be 
filed with and ruled upon by the Labor Relations Commission. An exclusive representative could collect a fee from 
providers for the costs of representing them. 

An exclusive representative could be de-certified under Commission regulations and procedures if certain condition 
were met. The Commission could not accept a decertification petition for at least 2 years after the first exclusive |(S 
representative was certified, and any such petition would have to be supported by 50% or more of the total number of 
providers. The Commission would then hold a secret mail ballot election for the providers to vote on whether to decertil 
the exclusive representative. 

The proposed law states that activities carried out under it would be exempt from federal anti-trust laws. The 
proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared invalid, the other parts would stay in effect. 
A YES VOTE would allow licensed and other authorized providers of child care in private homes under the state's 
subsidized child care system to bargain collectively with the state. 

A NO VOTE would make no change in the laws conceming licensed and other authorized family child care providers. 



LVC 

i 

w 

LS 



m 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said voting. 
Given under our hands this day of , 2006. 



Selectmen of: SWAMPSCOTT 



, 2006. 



Constable (month and day) 



3 

16 







TOTAL TOWN TALLY SHEET 














oWAIvlroL.vJ 1 1 






TOTAL VOTES CAST 


6312 






1 -inov-uo 




























VOTERS 


1853 






1629 


-I Ann 
10UU 


■1779 


9778 


















1 


1 




Q 
O 


4 


c 
O 





TOTAL 




















42 


OA 




43 


44 


no 

53 


241 


RD M KENNEDY Democratic 


845 


609 


685 


788 


721 


801 


4449 






193 


253 


297 


263 


OOO 

322 


1612 


■ UNO 


2 


5 


1 


1 





1 


10 


Q 

-O 


1 173 


837 


968 


1129 


1028 


1 177 


6312 


















RNOR 
















CS 


18 


8 


8 


15 


15 


17 


81 


=Y AND HII 1 MAN Rpniihlirj^n 




259 


300 




357 


422 


2084 


CK AND MURRAY Dpmorratir 




486 


543 




576 


650 


3581 


> AND SULLIVAN Indeoendent 


87 


59 


90 


64 


68 


71 


439 


AND ROBINSON Grppn Rainbow 




25 


27 




11 


17 


125 


■-INS 











1 


1 





2 


.s 


1173 


837 


968 


1 129 


1028 


1 177 


6312 


















INEY GENERAL 




















34 


65 




66 


63 


337 


HA COAKI FY Dpmnrratir 




644 


689 


R9fi 


729 


822 




' FRIROI 1 Rpniihllrjin 


97 J. 

^ f H 


157 


213 




233 


291 




i-INS 


1 


2 


1 







1 


c 


.s 


1 17"^ 
1 1 f o 


837 


968 


1 19Q 


1028 


1177 


fi319 


















ETARY OF STATE 
















»S 


111 


70 


100 


198 


132 


126 




\.M FRANCIS GALVIN Democratic 


870 


638 


682 




703 


799 




STEIN Grepn Rainhow 


186 


127 


186 


187 


192 


246 


1194 


•-INS 


R 


2 







1 


6 


1 f 


.3 


1 173 


837 


968 


1 19Q 


1028 


1177 


fill 9 

VO 1 A 


















SURER 
















;s 


197 


61 


102 


148 


150 


179 


7R7 
# Of 


HY P CAHILL Democratir 

■ ■ 1 I H l^Um 1 IV/wl OLIO 


ooo 


664 


723 




727 


857 


4RQR 


) O'KEEFE Green Rainhow 


1*17 


111 


143 


1*^8 

1 OO 


150 


137 


R3fi 
OOO 


:-INS 


"J 
o 


1 







1 


4 


1 1 


.s 


1173 


837 


968 


1 129 


1028 


1177 


6312 


















OR 
















:s 


148 


82 


133 


160 


162 


199 


884 


EPH DENUCCI Democratic 


847 


631 


697 


825 


717 


826 


4543 


WILSON Working Families 


172 


122 


137 


142 


148 


149 


870 


;-INS 


6 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 


15 


S 


1173 


837 


968 


1129 


1028 


1177 


6312 



17 



PRECINCT 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


TOTAL 


3nc 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 


















BLANKS 


46 


29 


54 


58 


58 


49 


294 


r 


JOHN F TIERNEY Democratic 


887 


644 


712 


826 


740 


840 


4649 




RICHARD W BARTON Republican 


239 


163 


200 


244 


230 


288 


13641 


- 


WRITE-INS 


1 


1 


2 


1 








5i 




TOTALS 


1173 


837 


968 


1129 


1028 


1177 


6312' 




















_ 

m 


COUNCILLOR 


















BLANKS 


151 


104 


161 


185 


214 


223 


10381 




MARY-ELLEN MANNING Democratic 


792 


556 


606 


716 


590 


702 


3962 




TIMOTHY P HOUTEN Independent 


229 


175 


199 


225 


224 


249 


1301 





WRITE-INS 


1 


2 


2 


3 





3 


11 




TOTALS 


1173 


837 


968 


1129 


1028 


1177 


6312 


HON 




















SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 














1 




BLANKS 


224 


155 


200 


258 


281 


287 


1405 


. — 


THOMAS M MCGEE Democratic 


938 


676 


759 


865 


737 


881 


4856 




! 


WRITE-INS 


11 


6 


9 


6 


10 


9 


51 




TOTALS 


1173 


837 


968 


1129 


1028 


1177 


6312 








































REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
















, 


BLANKS 


223 


157 


207 


262 


269 


283 


1401 


_ 


DOUGLAS W PETERSEN Democratic 


935 


674 


747 


857 


747 


884 


4844 




WRITE-INS 


15 


6 


14 


10 


12 


10 


67 





TOTALS 


1173 


837 


968 


1129 


1028 


1177 


6312 
























DISTRICT ATTORNEY 



















BLANKS 


260 


183 


230 


299 


299 


305 




. 


JONATHAN W BLODGETT Democratic 


904 


647 


732 


824 


722 


865 






WRITE-INS 


9 


7 


6 


6 


7 


7 


1576 





TOTALS 


1173 


837 


968 


1129 


1028 


1177 


4694 


















42 





CLERK OF COURTS 














6312 


- 


BLANKS 


250 


182 


227 


285 


294 


298 






THOMAS H DRISCOLL JR Democratic 


918 


648 


733 


840 


723 


874 






WRITE-INS 


5 


7 


8 


4 


11 


5 


1536 




TOTALS 


1173 


837 


968 


1129 


1028 


1177 


4736 


















40 


















6312 






















KCUld 1 cK Ur UctUo 


















BLANKS 


267 


184 


249 


325 


317 


336 


1678 




JOHN L O'BRIEN JR Democratic 


900 


648 


711 


798 


702 


836 


4595 




WRITE-INS 


6 


5 


8 


6 


9 


5 


39 




TOTALS 


1173 


837 


968 


1129 


1028 


1177 







18 



CINCT I 1 


2 


o 


4 


5 6 TOTAL 


TION 1 












KS 


87 


26 




4D 


48 


55 


314 




445 


379 


AAA 


Ron 
O^U 


494 


500 


2782 




641 


432 


A70 
4( ^ 


ODO 


486 


622 


3216 


L 


1173 


837 






1028 


1177 




















TION 2 
















KS 


178 


66 


nuy 


no 


127 


129 


727 




318 


279 


«5U4 


0( D 


346 


394 


2017 




677 


492 




ooo 


555 


654 


3568 


L 


1173 


837 




•1 d OQ 


1028 


1177 




















TION 3 
















KS 


166 


62 


1 uo 


1U0 


120 


122 


679 




441 


374 


417 




397 


442 


2526 




566 


401 


4*fO 


0( 1 


511 


613 


3107 


L 


1173 


837 






1028 


1177 


12624 

































































































































































































































































19 



SPECIAl TOWN MEETING 




Monday, November 13, 2006 
7:00 P.M. 
Temple Israel 
837 Humphrey Street 
Swampscott, Massachusetts 

Warrant Rapon 



20 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
November 2006 



SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETINGS: 



In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of said town that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, 
November 13, 2006, begirming at 7:00 P.M. in the former Temple Israel building located 
at 837 Humphrey Street, Swampscott. 



21 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place 
said meeting. 

Given under our hand this 1 8th day of October, 2006 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Chainnan 




22 



To: Board of Selectmen / Swampscott Town Clerk 
Administration Building 
22 Monument Avenue 
Swampscott, MA 01907 

From: Paul Minsky 

Constable of Swampscott 
15 Orchard Road 
Swampscott, MA 01907 

Re: Posting of Special Town Meeting Warrant 

Dear Sirs: 

Pursuant to the within wan-ant to be directed, I have notified the inhabitants of the Town 
of Swampscott, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs by posting an attested 
copy thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office and at least two 
public and conspicuous places in each precinct in the Town, and at or in the vicinity of 
the Swampscott Railroad Station. Said posting was done on October 25, 2006 and not 
less than seven (7) days before the date appointed for said meeting. 

Attest: 
Paul Minsky 

Constable of Swampscott 



23 



November 13, 2006 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2006, 7;00 P.M. 



To the Town Meeting Members: 



Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2, of the Bylaws of 
the Town of Swampscott that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, 
November 13, 2006, beginning at 7:00 p.m. in the former Temple Israel building located 
at 837 Humphrey Street. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman, Esquire, will preside. 



NOTES: 

Please remember that it is your responsibility to be recorded as being present with 
the door checkers prior to entering the auditorium. Also, please remember the following: 

1 . You must wear (display) your Town Meeting identification badge at all times; 

2. Remember to use the microphones when speaking on any issue so that your 
comments may be recorded on the official transcript of the meeting. 



Russell Patten 
Clerk of Swampscott 



24 



ARTICLE 1 . To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards and 

Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This routine Article appears every year to allow Town groups to make 
reports. 

Voted Article 1. That this article be approved. 
IVIajority Vote. 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary (see 

Appendix A), by borrowing or otherwise, to implement the collective bargaining agreements 
between the Board of Selectmen and the various unions under the Board of Selectmen for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1 , 2006, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining agreements. 

Voted Article 2. That this article be approved. 
IVIajority Vote. 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money, by borrowing or 

otherwise to the account of unpaid bills for the purpose of setting all bills contracted prior to July 
1 , 2006, and remaining unpaid at the time of the closing of the Town's books for the year ending 
June 30, 2006, according to the records of the Town Accountant, or take any action relative 
thereto (see Appendix B). 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to provide funding for payment of bills 
incurred during the fiscal year ending June 30, 2006 but not paid during said fiscal year. 

eWiz (Technology - Outside Services) $1 ,592.26 



This Article requires 9/10 affirmative vote to adopt 

Voted Article 3. That this article be approved. 
Unanimous Vote. 



25 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a General By-Law and/or to 

authorize the Board of Selectmen to seek special legislation authorizing the use of a 
photographic traffic nnonitoring system, also referred to as a so-called "automated red light 
enforcement" system, which will record digital images, or images on other types of media, of 
vehicles proceeding through red lights at intersections where monitoring equipment is installed 
and authorizing the Swampscott Police Department to take enforcement action against the 
owners or lessees of vehicles who the Swampscott Police Department determine, based upon 
the images captured by the traffic monitoring system, proceeded through red lights; said bylaw or 
special legislation will also address various issues relative to implementation of said traffic 
monitoring system, including the specific processes for enforcement of violations and maintaining 
and using data collected by the photographic monitoring system, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Red Light Camera Committee 

Article 4. That this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Job Classification and Salary Plan 

of the Personnel Board Bylaws, as it relates to those positions not covered by collective 
bargaining agreements, as follows: 

Reclassify "Town Planner" from M7 to M6 

Create S1 (stipend) position of "Purchasing Agent" $6,500 

Delete M6 "Assistant Building Inspector" 

Create S1 (stipend) position of "Local Building Inspector" $20,700 

Or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article will modify the Personnel Board Bylaws as specified above. 
No appropriation is required. 

Article 5. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $525,000, originally 

borrowed for the purposes described in Appendix C hereto, which amounts are no longer needed 
to complete the projects for which they were initially borrowed, to pay costs associated with the 
construction of a new high school, or to take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Building Committee 

Article 6. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



26 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 11/13/2006 



Pre Name 


Address 






1 Baldacci, Richard R 


43 Sampson Ave 






1 Barbuzzi, Pamela Ann 


185 Winder Ave 




X 


1 Bartlett-Genest Lee 


47 Elwin St 




X 


1 Batchelder Kathleen 


33 The Greenway ' 




1 Bates, Wallace T. 


■ 73 Foster Rd 1 




1 Blonder, Cindy M. 


15 Shackle Way 




K 


1 Blonder, Jeffrey S 


15 Shackle Way 




X 


1 Brenner, Lawrence 


44 Elwin Rd 






1 Buchanan, Susan 


84 Roy St 




xr 


1 Chouinard Leah 


12 0verhillRd 






1 Chouinard, Conrad L. 


12 0verhill Rd 






1 Chouinard, Madeline 


12 Overhill Rd 






1 Condon Linda 


41 Nichols St 




X' 


1 Cresta, Gino A Jr 


76 Windsor Ave 




X 


1 Cropley, John H. Jr. 


14Tidd St 




X 


1 Dandreo, Robert 


28 Vaughan PI 




X 


1 Dandreo, William 


91 Roy St 






1 Davis Jeremy 


1008 Paradise Rd IE 




» 


1 Delano, Ted 


110 Eastman Ave 






1 Dorgan, Denise 


40 Nichols St 






1 Doyle, Candace 


110 Eastman Ave 






1 Finlay Patricia 


57 Sampson Ave 




X 


1 Hartmann, Eric 


39 Nichols St 




X 


1 Hartmann, Marianne 


39 Nichols St 






1 Hyde, Sally A 


10 Overhill Rd 




X' 


1 Hyde, William R Sr 


10 Overhill Rd 




X 


1 Johnson Maryalice 


49 Windsor Ave 




X 


1 Kaloust, Gerald J. 


262 Essex St 






1 Kaloust, Roberta A. 


262 Essex St 






1 Kaplan Shirley 


1004 Paradise Rd 2F 




X 


1 Kearney Sheila 


14 Shackle Way 




X 


1 Keay Maralyn 


3 Hawser Ln 






1 Kessler, Nelson 


1002 Paradise Rd 




X 


1 Legere, J. Arthur 


44 Foster Rd 






1 Lombard James 


7 Tidd St 






1 Lucas, Tom 


55 Elwin St 






1 Maher William 


2 Martin St 






1 Maitland, Susan 


16 Crescent St 




X 


1 Miles, Chris 


7 Fisher Ave 






1 Montague, Neil 


14 Capstan Way 




X 


1 Patrikis, Theodore A. 


1006 Paradise Rd 




X 


1 Picariello, John A 


53 Carson Ter 




X 


1 Picariello, Lawrence 


40 Eastman Ave 




X 


1 Pierce Kimberly 


74 Buena Vista 






1 Pierce Todd 


74 Buena Vista 




XI 


1 Powell Sally 


65 Carson Ter 




X. 


1 Rizzo, Carole 


18 Nichols St 






1 Serine, Michael A 


99 Burpee Rd 




X' 


1 Shannon Cynthia 


4 Palleschi Dr 




X 


1 Speranza, Frances 


1 Martin Way 






1 Wheeler, Matt 


68 Sampson Ave 




X- 


1 Whittier, Douglas 


1 Bickford Way 




— X 


1 Wu Heng Sien 


110 Foster Rd 


















27 



Prp Namp Aririrp^s 






7 Rarik Lisa Carriaan 48 Grant Rri 






9 RprHpn Fiinpnp '^IR Par^iHi^p RH 

^ OGt l| ^u^^l \y 1 \J n Cll Cl\JIO\7 r\vl 




V 

A 


9 RInnrlpr SiJ<?an '^Q Rarn<;tflhlp St 






7 Bnwpn David 10Q Norfoll< Avp 




\r 
A 


*? namfifon .lanpll A Q7 Farraniit Rri 




y 
A 


9 Hflrnn Mark R 77 Franklin Avp 






9 Cfl^€;iri\/ Tim 1Q Ram^tahlp St 






9 nrimnnin^ ln<;pnh fift Walkpr RH 




X 


9 niirrv Martha I'^RankciRri 






9 Dohprtv Danipl F 1*^*^ Norfolk Avp 




V 
A 


2 Dohprtv Jotin J Fi!i<i RH 




A 


9 rilinn 1 arrv \AP% StptQon Avp 






9 Hiinn .hiriith F 1 StptQon Avp 






9 (^iannrpnorio Rioharri ^ Rpllpctir T\t 

Cm VJIdt 1^1 iw r\iV^llCilU *T DdlwClll L^l 






9 f^ioioQa k^plltP 1*^7 ParaHicp RH 






9 HampI f^rpn 10 C\piV\(^t\n^ RH 

Cm 1 lOlllwli x^l lU \^Cli\lwUMw ixU 






2 Hamilton Bruce 10*^ Stpt^on Avp 

£^ 1 Idlllllivll L./I UwW \\J\J VJlwlOwl 1 «AVw 






9 Hphprt Donalri 9 Summit Vipw Hr 

^ 1 l^iywi I, L-/Vfl ICIILI Cm Oullilllll View L/l 






9 Hphprt .lanpt 9 Summit Vipw Rr 
1 iwii^wi If wcii lei ^ wuiiiiiiii V low \J\ 




Y, 


9 Hunt Stpohpn ft ttrant RH 
^ 1 lui 11 wLc^i 1^1 1 \j vji oi 11 r\u 




■\r 
A 


9 InA/ln Wpnriv 17 RriQtol Avp 
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V 


9 .laok^on 1 orpnp 1 1 1 onnwooH Dr 

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Y 

A. 


9 Jark^on William 1 1 1 onowooH Hr 

Cm wClwiXOwl l| V V IIIICII II II ^V.11 IMWV/wVl L^l 




Y 
/A 


2 Locke Jonathan '^Q Rprk^hirp St 

€^ wVifllCltllCIII U Wl l\Oi III w \J L 




✓A 


2 Lvon<? Wpnriv A 1 2*1 Nnrfnik Avp 

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X 


9 Marrou Martha 1 ftO Franklin St 

Cm IVICII ^^WLI, iViCll Li ICl L. \J\J 1 IClllixllll WL 




X 


2 McCafferv Ro<iP 101 Norfolk Avp 

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9 McHiinh Donna 91 Fa^tman Avp 

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9 Mr! auohlin .lohn fi*^ StptQon Avp 

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9 Morrpll Aoatha 91 Rank^ RH 

c, ivi\^iiwii| r^^dii Id Cm 1 Ddiiixo rxu 






9 Miilvpv FHwarH 110 Norfolk Avp 

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9 Miirnhv Rrian H ProQOprt St 

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9 Npwhall 1 inria A 1^ Nantiipkpt Avp 

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9 Npwhail Waltpr lil Nsnti ir^kpt Avp 




X 


9 Pallpc;rhi FriwarH A 1 FIIIq RH 

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9 Pinkprfon Hon 1*^ Rankc RH 

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9 Pitman Michael 1fi4 Walkpr RH 
^ 1 iiiiidii| iviiv/i idd 1 w*T V V di i\wi r\vi 






9 Ram^tinp Patricia Karama^ 17*^ ParaHlQP RH 
Cm 1 \di 1 ioiii iW| 1 dii iv^id i\di di 1 ido t t \j 1 didUioc? r\vi 






2 Rparrion Filpn M R2 Norfolk Avp 

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2 Richmonri Daviri F fi Swamo^cott Avp 




Y* 
A' 


9 Romano John 1 9 Paton Tpr 

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9 Riihin Dphra 10 Summit Vipxa/ Dr 

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9 Riionipro John 4ft Franklin Avp 

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A 


9 Rvan 1 pah 1R Hiikp RH 

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2 Schiilt7 Jack<;on 9*^ Hamnrien St 

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2 Scihelli Anthonv A 97 1 onnwooH Hr 

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9 Shanahan Jo^poh F Jr 4 Paton Tpr 

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2 Strauss Daniellp 1*^ Dukp St 

Cm ^^tiduoo, L^di li^iie I \j Lyuixe \Jk 






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« 


2 Whelan David Jr 131 Paradise Rd 






2 Zamansky Elizabeth Belkin 51 Prospect St 




« 









28 



Pre Name Address 






3 Bartram, Paul 39 Grant Rd 




X' 


3 Bennett, Ralph Ell 35 Rock Ave 






3 Boggs Deborah A 42 Walker Ave 




X 


3 Breen, Kevin F 47 Paradise Rd 




X 


3 Breen, Leslie A 47 Paradise Rd 




X 


3 Cardenas Patricia 20 Beach Ave 




X 


3 Cassidy, John R 37 Farragut Rd 




X 


3 Coletti, John M 59 Norfolk Ave 




X 


3 Cormier, Kathleen 51 Thomas Rd 




X 


3 Dandreo, Daniel Jill 46 Rock Ave 






3 DePaolo Jan 30 Hillcrest Ave 




X 


3 Donaher Karen 28 Burpee Rd 




X 


3 Donaher, Kevin 28 Burpee Rd 




X 


3 Driscoll, Anne 2 Upland Rd 






3 Eldridge, Barbara F 15 Maple Ave 






3 Fitzhenry George 2 Essex Ter 




X- 


3 Fox, Deborah 18 Walker Rd 




X 


3 Frenkel Leonora 3 Grant Rd 




x- 


3 Frenkel, Richard 3 Grant Rd 




X- 


3 Gallagher, Tara 12 Hillcrest Cir 




X. 


3 Gay, Donna 1 12 Essex St 




X. 


3 Genoversa Susan 42 Thomas Rd 






3 Hayes, Paul E 33 Norfolk Ave 




X 


3 Hitchcock, Sarah P 82 Essex St 






3 Holmes, Betty Dean 86 Cherry St 






3 Jolly, Linda J 80 Columbia St 




X 


3 Jolly, Robert V Jr 80 Columbia St 






3 Kelleher, Martha G 11 Outlook Rd 




X. 


3 Kelly, Nancy 185BumllSt 






3 Kenney Stephen 3 Ellis Rd 




X* 


3 Lawlor, James C 24 Shaw Rd 






3 Ledbury, Lisa 251 Burrill St 




X' 


3 Legere, Donald R Jr 11 Beach Ave 






3 Lincoln Loring B Jr 164 Burrill St 




X- 


3 Lincoln, Maria F 164 Burrill St 




X. 


3 Luke Gerald 9 Valley Rd 






3 Magee, Kathleen 29 Andrew Rd 




X 


3 Marvosh, Smilia 19 Essex St 




X 


3 Meister Bunny Young 51 Norfolk Ave 




X 


3 Moltz Sandra 9 New Ocean St 




X 


3 Mulgay Mark 87 Pine St 




X 


3 Perry, Gerald D 60 Burpee Rd 




X 


3 Pilotte Denis 19 Thomas Rd 




X 


3 Richard Dianne 20 Superior St 




X 


3 Sachs-Freeman, Barbara 32 Andrew Rd 




X 


3 Sainato Maryann 20 Superior St 




X 


3 Sheehan. Neil G 28 Hillcrest Cir 






3 Thomson, Maureen 71 Thomas Rd 




X 


3 Vousboukis, William 199 Burrill Ave 






3 Weaver David 48 Thomas Rd 




X. 


3 Webster, Mary 7 Elmwood Rd 






3 Welch Thomas 58 Essex St 




X 


3 Wright, Suzanne 1 1 Hardy Rd 




Xi 


3 Zeman, Cynthia 48 Thomas Rd 













29 



Pre Name Address 






4 Anderson Dana 74 Aspen Rd 






4 Baker, Janet N 29 Rockland St 




X 


4 Balsama, Joseph J 23 Shenwood Rd 




X 


4 Garden, Marc 377 Forest Ave 




X 


4 Bonazzoli, Paula 359 Forest Ave 




X 


4 Brown Rachel 99 Banks Rd 




X. 


4 Brown, Andrew 99 Banks Rd 




X. 


4 Cunningham, Kelly 52 Greenwood Ave 






4 Dawley Thomas 137 Redington St 




X 


4 DeChillo, Mary H 7 Rockland St 




X. 


4 DiMento, William R 64 Bay View Rd 




X 


4 Donelan, Robert E 295 Forest Ave 






4 Donnenfeld Neil 66 Lexington Cir 






4 Drummond, Brian 1 53 Redington St 




Yz: 


4 Drummond, Ellen M 1 53 Redington St 






4 Faico, Michael 142 Redington St 




X, 


4 Goldman, Iris 24 Sheridan Rd 






4 Goudreau, Connie 61 Greenwood Ave 




X 


4 Hughes, Nancy 8 Brooks Ter 






4 Johnson, Anne 96 Magnolia Rd 




X 


4 Johnson, Paul W 44 Oceanview Rd 




X' 


4 Kane Richard M Jr 81 King St 




» 


4 Keeter TerrI 66 Shenwood Rd 






4 Krippendorf, Edward W. Sr 11 Mapledale PI 






4 Leger, Jeanne 58 Redington St 






4 Lord, Gary 10 Pine Hill Rd 






4 Lord, Nancy 10 Pine Hill Rd 






4 Madigan, Elizabeth 4 Sheridan Ter 






4 McBumey Michelle 92 Fuller Ave 






4 McClung Michael 64 Fuller Ave 






4 Mcenaney, John T 18 Sargent Rd 






4 McNerney, Cynthia 374 Humphrey St 




X 


4 Meninno, Christine 13 Supreme Ct 






4 Morretti, Nunzio "Butch" 107 Aspen Rd 






4 Moynihan, John 27 Rockland St 






4 Nugent Robert 69 Magnolia Rd 






4 O'Brien, Laurie 1 1 Fuller Ave 




X 


4 Phelan John V IV 75 Banks Rd 




X 


4 Phelan, John V III 75 Banks Rd 




X 


4 Poska Matthew 58 Magnolia Rd 






4 Powell, Amy 70 Fuller Ave 




Xi- 


4 Reagan. John 25 Brooks Ter 






4 Santanello, Daniel 6 Supreme Ct 




X 


4 Sarafini-Foley Phyllis 59 Millett Rd 






4 Shanahan, Patricia D 48 King St 






4 Shanahan, William E 48 King St 






4 Sheehan Neil G 26 Mapledale PI 






4 Shore Geraldine 50 Ocean View Rd 




X 


4 Somer, Margaret 32 Bay View Ave 






4 Stone, Myron S 1 5 Bay View Ave 




X 


4 Vaucher, Catherine M 14DevensRd 






4 Walsh, Karyn LK 21 Lexington Cir 






4 Withrow, Marysusan Buckley 27 Greenwood Ave 






4 Wynne, Katie 373 Forest Ave 













30 



're Name Address 






5 Akim, Marta 1 Glen Rd 






5 Belhumeur, Cynthia natch 423 Puritan Kd 




K 


5 Belhumeur, R. Thomas 423 Puritan Rd 






5 BrooKs, Gerald 41 Beverly Kd 




Y 
•A 


5 Burke, Scott Douglas Forest Ave 






5 Callahan, Michael 1 Smith Ln 






5 Caplan, Edward 26 Laurel Rd 






5 Carangelo, Lisa 31 Lincoln House Ft 




rX 


5 Carr, Heather 385 Puritan Rd 






5 Cerra Anthony J 15 Sargent Rd 




Y 


5 Chapman, Randy 408 Puritan Rd 






5 Connolly Loretta 67 Ocean View Rd 






5 Devlin, Michael K 23 Puritan Ln 




/X 


5 Forman Amy 81 Bates Rd 




,x 


5 Forman, Adam 81 Bates Rd 




,x 


5 Garner Ronald 38 Gale Rd 






5 Goldsmith, Alice 55 Galloupes Pt. Rd 






5 Graham, David ' 7 Juniper Rd 






5 Hartmann, Jill 40 Glen Rd 






5 Hennessey, William 23 Puritan Rd 




K 


5 Hodgkin, Doreen L 8 Puritan Ln 




X 


5 Hyman, Merle 25 Pine Hill Rd 




X 


Jaffe, Sharon Tnpolsky 105 Shelton Rd 






5 Jancsy, John F 20 Aspen Rd 




<X 


5 Karwowski, John R 2 Prospect Ave 






5 Keller, Ellen Long 73 Ocean View Rd 






5 Lawler, Jack 6 Gale Rd 






5 Lawler, Sami 6 Gale Rd 






5 Lipson Philip 2 Robin Ln 






5 MacDonald, Matthew 1 93 Forest Ave 






5 Nellis, Veeder C 16 Beverly Rd 






5 Patkin, Randall 34 Ross Road 






5 Potash, Leola 20 Laurel Rd 






5 Pye, Darlene 62 Ocean View Rd 




X 


5 Reardon, Can 25 Glen Rd 






5 Reichert, Leslie E 74 Galloupes Pt Rd 






5 Rogers, Roberta C 31 Beverly Rd 




X 


5 Rossman Neil 455 Puntan Rd 






5 Rubin, Gayle 57 Lincoln House Pt 






5 Sneirson, Gerald 339 Puritan Rd 




X 


5 Spartos, Mary Anne 704 Humphrey St 






5 Steinman, Roy H 129 Galloupes Pt 






C A M M L» M M M ^ri— • — _ 1 ^ n I / • 1 ■ 

5 Stephens, Thomas J 63 Kensington Ln 




X 


5 Sullivan, Jill 43 Lincoln House Pt 




X 


5 Talkov, Roger 16 Ross Rd 






5 Toner, Colleen 80 Sargent Rd 






5 Van dam David S 396 Puritan Rd 






5 Vanderburg, Linso 152 Puritan Rd 




X 


5 Weiner, Lawrence J 11 Walnut Rd 




X 


Wilson, Catherine E 55 Shelton Rd 






Zannsky, irma W Dr 21 Sutton PI 




X 


5 Zeller, David E 37 Walnut Rd 






zeiier, Virginia 37 Walnut Rd 




X 








Pre Name Address 







31 



6 Baker, Robert A 75 Stanley Rd 




X 


6 Beermann, Jack M 9 Sumner St 




X 


6 Bel kin, Sylvia B 35 Beach Bluff Ave 




X 


6 •Bloek-tawrence-S — ~48~erosf1nan Ave 






6 Block, Ina-Lee 48 Crosman Ave 




X 


6 Burke Michael F 45 Bellevue Rd 




X 


6 Carroll, William 33 Morton Rd 




X 


6 Cassidy, Reid J 24 Crosman Ave 






6 Cronin, Michael 25 Manton Rd 




X 


6 Cronin, Tammy 45 Manton Rd 




-X 


6 Dembowski, Claire C 42 Beach Bluff Ave 




;x 


6 Doherty-Healy Mary 25 Harrison Ave 




•X 


6 Driscoll, Thomas H Jr. Esq 28 Crosman Ave 






6 Drucas, Chris 56 Bradlee Ave 






6 Eriich Norman 63 Linden Ave 




/X 


6 Frisch, Peter 20 Mostyn St 






6 Gold, Anne W 79 Bradlee Ave 






6 Goldberg, Arthur 1 80 Bradlee Ave 






6 Goldman, Jeff 6 Allen Rd 






6 Goldman, Martin C 3 Ingraham Ter 




X 


6 Gupta, Mary Kelly 48 Atlantic Ave 






6 Jacobs, Susan 21 Crosman Ave 




X 


6 Kane John C. Jr 28 Puritan Pk 




X 


6 Kane, Susan 28 Puritan Pk 






6 Kravtin-Horwitz Patricia 57 Phillips Ave 






6 Levenson, Paul E Esq 63 Shepard Ave 






6 Levenson, Sheryl 83 Shepard Ave 






6 Locke, Judith E 15 Dennison Ave 






6 Markarian, Joe 22 Nason Rd 






6 Merkle, Cynthia 44 Dale St 






6 O'Hare, Mary Michael 24 Manton Rd 






6 Paster Ruth 6 Brown Rd 




'X 


6 Paster, Marc 6 Brown Rd 




' X 


6 Pelletier, Maria 1 1 Brown Rd 




>x 


6 Pitman. Martha 23 Nason Rd 






6 Poster, Eugene L 61 Nason Rd 




'X 


6 Rotner, Kim 44 Lincoln Cir 






6 Rotner, Philip 44 Lincoln Cir 




. X 


6 Ryan, Daniel 53 Lincoln Cir 




y X 


6 Ryan, Mary Ann 85 Morton Rd 






6 Ryan, William 85 Morton Rd 






6 Sackett, Shelley A 116 Ocean Ave 




,x 


6 Seligman, Edward 1 3 Young Ave 




.X 


6 Shutzer, Carole B 1 Salem St 




(X 


6 Shutzer, Kenneth B 1 Salem St 




* X 


6 Simms, Bobbye Lou 47 Morton Rd 




.X 


6 Thomas J Healey 25 Harrison Ave 






6 Walsh Kerin 37 Estabrook Rd 






6 Watson Brian T 38 Stanwood Rd 




. X 


6 Whitman, Andrew S 19 Puritan Pk 




•x 


6 Witt, Sherri L. 4 Crosman Ave 






6 Yaeger, Dan 131 Walker Rd 




•x 


6 Yaeger, Lisa L 131 Walker Rd 






6 Yellin Benjamin 25 Sumner St 



















32 



NOTICE OF ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



The Annual Town Meeting of 2007 will convene on Tuesday, April 24, 2007, with Article 1 
(the Town Election) at 7:00 a.m. in the Town's regular polling places. At 8:00 p.m., the Town 
Meeting will be adjourned until Monday, May 7, 2007, 7:15 p.m., in the former Temple Israel 
building located at 837 Humphrey Street, Swampscott. 



NOTICE OF ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY. MAY 7. 2007. 7:15 P.M. 



To the Town Meeting members: 



Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article I, Section 2, of the Bylaws of the Town of 
Swampscott that the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting will be held on Monday, May 7, 2007, 
beginning at 7:15 p.m. in the former Temple Israel building located at 837 Humphrey Street, 
Swampscott. 

The required Identification badge is to be picked up at the auditorium entrance when you 
check in. 

NOTICE OF PRECINCT CAUCUS MEETINGS 

Caucus meetings for all Swampscott precincts have been scheduled for Monday, May 7, 
2007, beginning at 6:45 p.m. in the former Temple Israel building located at 837 Humphrey 
Street, Swampscott. Room assignments are as follows: 

Precinct 1 - Room TBA Precinct 4 - Room TEA 

Precinct 2 - Room TBA Precinct 5 - Room TBA 

Precinct 3 - Room TBA Precinct 6 - Room TBA 

NOTES: 

Please remember that it is YOUR responsibility to be recorded as being present with the 
door checkers prior to entering the auditorium for EACH session. Excessive absences are cause 
for removal from Town Meeting membership. Also, please remember the following: 

1. You must wear (display) your Town Meeting identification badge at all times; 

2. Remember to use the microphones when speaking on any issue so that your 
comments may be recorded on the official transcript of the meeting and he heard 
by your fellow members in the hall and residents viewing the live cable telecast. 

Russell Patten 
Clerk of Swampscott 



33 



TOTAL TOWN TALLY 




1 


Registered Voters 


9593 






APRIL 24 2007 






# Voted 


756 






TOWN ELECTION 






Percent voted 


7.9 
























PI 


P2 


P3 


P4 


P5 


P6 


TOTAL 


















MODERATOR 
















VOTE FOR 1 
















Blanks 


35 


35 


46 


50 


48 


41 


255 


MARTIN C GOLDMAN 


84 


79 


89 


88 


76 


71 


487 


Write-ins 


1 


1 


4 


3 


4 


1 


14 


Total 


120 


115 


139 


141 


128 


113 


756 


















BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
















VOTE FOR 2 
















Blanks 


67 


66 


110 


88 


101 


82 


514 


ERIC WALKER 


82 


68 


71 


87 


70 


71 


449 


ANTHONY A SCIBELLI 


89 


94 


93 


105 


81 


71 


533 


Write-ins 


2 


2 


4 


2 


4 


2 


16 


Total 


240 


230 


278 


282 


256 


226 


1512 


















BOARD OF ASSESSORS 3-YEARS 
















VOTE FOR 1 
















Blanks 


35 


37 


41 


50 


50 


45 


258 


NEIL G SHEEHAN 


83 


78 


98 


91 


77 


68 


495 


Write-ins 


2 











1 





3 


Total 


120 


115 


139 


141 


128 


113 


756 


















BOARD OF ASSESSORS 1 YEAR 
















VOTE FOR 1 
















Blanks 


45 


36 


56 


55 


51 


47 


290 


WILLIAM C SULLIVAN 


75 


79 


83 


86 


76 


66 


465 


Write-ins 














1 





1 


Total 


120 


115 


139 


141 


128 


113 


756 


















SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
















VOTE FOR 2 
















Blanks 


69 


77 


115 


89 


94 


69 


513 


NEIL S BERNSTEIN 


86 


71 


77 


92 


81 


81 


488 


JOSEPH P CRIMMINS 


84 


82 


80 


101 


79 


76 


502 


Write-ins 


1 





6 ^ 


^ 


2 





9 


Total 


240 


230 


278 1 282 


256 


226 


1512 
















TRUSTEE OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 






j 








VOTE FOR 1 














Blanks 


22 


15 


25 14 


26 


13 


115 


JONATHAN A PENYACK 


35 


33 


57 35 1 


26 


15 


201 


JOANNE VAN DER BURG 


^ 63 


67 


57 1 92 


73 


85 


437 


Write-ins 











3 





3 


Total 120 1 


115 


139 141 


128 


113 


756 














i 













34 



















































































^RD OF HEALTH 
















TE FOR 1 
















nks 


32 


32 


46 


46 


48 


29 


233 


VRENCE S BLOCK MD 


88 


83 


93 


95 


79 


83 


521 


te-ins 














1 


1 


2 


Total 


120 


115 


139 


141 


128 


113 


756 


















^NING BOARD 
















TE FOR 1 
















iks 


41 


40 


55 


57 


55 


42 


290 


FREY S BLONDER 


78 


75 


83 


84 


72 


71 


463 


te-ins 


1 





1 





1 





3 


Total 


543 


527 


613 


656 


588 


537 


3464 


















«ISTABLE 
















TE FOR 3 
















iks 


139 


136 


180 


171 


183 


166 


975 


JL MINSKY 


78 


71 


78 


89 


70 


66 


452 


3ERT DONNELLY 


73 


74 


82 


85 


68 


51 


433 


;PHEN B SIMMONS 


68 


63 


75 


78 


61 


56 


401 


te-ins 


2 


1 


2 





2 





7 


Total 


360 


345 


417 


423 


384 


339 


2268 






35 











April 12. 2007 



To: Board of Selectmen / Swampscott Town Clerk 
Administration Building 
22 Monument Avenue 
Swampscott, MA 01907 

From: Paul Minsky 

Constable of Swampscott 
1 5 Orchard Road 
Swampscott, MA 01907 

Re: Posting of Town Meeting Warrant 

Dear Sirs/ Madams: 

Pursuant to the within warrant to be directed, I have notified the inhabitants of the Town 
of Swampscott, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs by posting an attested copy 
thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office and at least two public and 
conspicuous places in each precinct in the Town, and at or in the vicinity of the Swampscott 
Railroad Station. Said posting was done on April 13, 2007 and not less than seven (7) days 
before the date appointed for said meeting. 

Attest: 

Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 




36 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
April 2007 



SS. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections and Town affairs to vote at: 



Precinct One 
Precinct Two 
Precinct Three 
Precinct Four 
Precinct Five 
Precinct Six 



Clarke School 



Clarke School 



Norfolk Avenue 



Norfolk Avenue 



First Church Congregational Monument Avenue 



First Church Congregational 
Swampscott High School 
Swampscott High School 



Monument Avenue 
Forest Avenue 
Forest Avenue 



on Tuesday, the twenty-fourth day of April, 2007, from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following 
purpose: 

To choose a Moderator for one (1 ) year 

To choose two (2) members for the Board of Selectmen for three (3) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Board of Assessors for three (3) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Board of Assessors for one (1 ) year 

To choose two (2) members for the School Committee for three (3) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Trustees of the Public Library for three (3) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Board of Health for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Planning Board for five (5) years 

To choose three (3) Constables for three (3) years 

To choose eighteen (18) Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) precincts for three (3) 
years. 

To choose two (2) Town Meeting Members in precinct one for one (1) year. 

At the close of the election, the meeting will adjourn to Monday, May 7, 2007, at 7:15 p.m. 
in the former Temple Israel building located at 837 Humphrey Street, Swampscott. 



37 



Attendance 

Attendance for the Annual Town Meeting will be found at the end of this report. 
Town Meeting Action 

The Return of Service was read by Town Clerk, Russell Patten who then administered the Oath 
of Office to the newly elected Town Meeting members. 



Action Under the Articles 

ARTICLE 2. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards and 

Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

A report from Joe Markarian of the High School Building Committee. 
A report from Chris Drucas of the Town By-Law Committee. 
A report from Jill Sullivan of the Temple Israel Study Committee. 
A report from Linso Vanderburg of the Phillip's Park Study Committee. 

2007 Distinguished Service Award of the Year awarded to Cynthia C. l\/lerl<le. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court to the end that 

special legislation be adopted as set forth below; provided however, that the General Court may 
make clerical or editorial changes of form only to the bill, unless: the Board of Selectmen 
approves amendments to the bill prior to enactment by the General Court which shall be within 
the scope of the general public objectives of this petition, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to approve said amendments: 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1 . Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or 
special law to the contrary, and upon approval by a majority vote 
of a Swampscott Town meeting, the parents, whether natural, 
adoptive, or those who stood in loco parentis to. Army Specialist 
Jared J. Raymond, and Marine Captain Jennifer J. Harris, shall 
receive a one hundred percent real estate tax exemption for real 
estate located at 4 Elwin Street, Swampscott, MA, and 30 
Pitman Road, Swampscott, MA, such exemption to be effective 
for Fiscal Year 2008. 

Or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This article will allow the Board of Selectmen to petition the state 
legislature to allow the Town to abate the Fiscal 2008 real estate taxes of the parents of 
Army Specialist Jared Raymond and Captain Jennifer Harris, who lost their lives in Iraq, 
while in service to this country. 

Voted Article 3. That this article be approved. 
Unanimous Vote. 



38 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of M.G.L., Chap. 40, 

Sec. 8J, to establish a commission on disability. Said commission shall consist of not less than 
five nor more than nine members to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen. A majority of said 
commission members shall consist of people of disabilities, one member shall be a member of 
the immediate family of a person with a disability and one member of said commission shall be 
either an elected or appointed official of the Town. The terms of the first members of said 
commission shall be for one, two or three years, and so arranged that the term of one-third of 
members expires each year, and their successor shall be appointed for terms of three years 
each, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Such commission shall (1 ) research local problems of people with 
disabilities; (2) advise and assist municipal officials and employees in ensuring 
compliance with state and federal laws and regulations that affect people with disabilities; 
(3) coordinate and carry out programs of the Massachusetts office on disability; (4) 
review and make recommendations about policies, procedures, services, activities and 
facilities of departments, boards and agencies of the town as they affect people with 
disabilities; (5) provide information, referrals, guidance and technical assistance to 
individuals, public agencies, businesses and organizations in all matters pertaining to 
disability; (6) coordinate activities of other local groups organized for similar purposes. 

Voted Article 4. That this article be approved. 
Unanimous Vote. 



ARTICLE 5. To see if Town Meeting will vote to accept, for all boards, committees or 

commissions, holding adjudicatory hearing in the Town, the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 39, Sec. 23D which provides that a member of a board, committee or commission 
holding an adjudicatory hearing shall not be disqualified from voting in the matter solely due to a 
member's absence from one session of such hearing, provided that certain conditions are met 
and provided further that such acceptance shall be applicable to all adjudicatory hearings opened 
on or after the effective date of the vote taken hereunder, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Voted Article 5. That this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a resolution supporting exploration 

of the concept of establishing a regional operations center (ROC) for Essex County; and further to 
authorize the Town Administrator to appoint an individual to serve as the town's representative to 
a committee of similar representatives from other municipalities in Essex County that adopt a 
similar resolution, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This article would authorize the Town Administrator to appoint an 
individual to explore the benefits of have Swampscott public safety calls dispatched by a 
regional dispatch center that would perform the same service for other municipalities in 
Essex County. 

Voted Article 6. That this article be approved. 
IVlajority Vote. 



39 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court to the end that 

special legislation be adopted amending the Town Charter to reduce the number of elected Town 
Meeting members, as on file with the Town Clerk; provided however, that the General Court may 
make clerical or editorial changes of form only to the bill, unless the Board of Selectmen 
approves amendments to the bill prior to enactment by the General Court which shall be within 
the scope of the general public objectives of this petition, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to approve said amendments: 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Please refer to the report of the Town Meeting Size Committee. 

Voted Article 7. That this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Moderator and the 

Town Administrator to appoint a Town Building Study Committee consisting of seven members, 
all of which must be residents of the Town of Swampscott, and to see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Chair of the School Committee to appoint a School Master Plan Update 
Committee, consisting of nine members including two members of the School Committee, one 
whom will serve as chair, the Town Moderator or designee, a teacher, an architect, an individual 
with knowledge of construction and three parents, all of which must be residents of the Town of 
Swampscott, and the Superintendent of Schools (ex-officio) and the Chair of the Capital 
improvements Committee or designee (ex-officio). The purpose of the Town Building Study 
Committee will be to recommend possible uses and reuses of municipal and school buildings for 
consideration by the Selectmen and School Committee. The purpose of the School Master Plan 
Update Committee is to consider the use and reuse of school buildings, grade consolidation, 
infrastructure repair and maintenance and other planning consistent with furthering the 
educational mission of the Swampscott Public Schools. Said committees shall file preliminary 
reports with the Town Clerk on or before December 31 , 2007, and a final report with the Town 
Clerk on or before April 1 , 2008, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This committee would be charged with developing a long range plan for 
the appropriate use and re-use of all public buildings. 

Voted Article 8 as amended. That this article be approved. 
IVIajority Vote. 



40 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by 

borrowing or otherwise and vote to appropriate the sum of $499,508, originally borrowed for the 
purposes described in Appendix F hereto, which amounts are not longer needed to complete the 
projects for which they were initially borrowed, to pay for the following projects, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

No. Purpose Requested Recommended 

School Department 

08-01 Mag. Door Holder/Auto Openers (Forest Ave) 25,000 25,000 

08-02 Handicapped Access Bathroom (Forest Ave) 45,000 45,000 

08-03 Retro-fit Classroom (Forest Ave) 75,000 75,000 

08-04 Update Master Plan 150,000 150,000 

08-05 Interior Door Replacement (Hadley) 40.583 40,583 

08-06 Plumbing Renovations (Clarke and Hadley) 60,000 60,000 

08-07 Motorized Bleachers (Forest Ave,) 30,000 30,000 

08-08 Asbestos Abatement (Clarke) 92,500 92,500 

08-09 Asbestos Abatement (Stanley) 25.000 25.000 

08-10 Floor Tile Replacement (Stanley) 60,000 60,000 

Department of Public Works 

08-1 1 Equipment - Bucket Truck 50,000 50.000 

08-12 Boat Ramp 100.000 94.000 

08-13 Playground and Open Space Improvements 50.000 50.000 

08-14 Public Buildings Maintenance 80.000 80,000 

08-1 5 Phillips Beach Outfall 120,000 120,000 

Police Department 

08-16 Replace Dispatch Operations Consoles 54,000 54,000 

08-17 Police Cruisers (2) 58,000 29,000 

Fire Department 

08-18 Fire Vehicle 44.000 28.000 

08-19 Security/Overhead Door 51.575 51.575 

Technology 

08-20 Equipment upgrades and replacement 50.000 50,000 

08-21 CIS 50,000 25,000 

Traffic 

08-22 Stetson @ Essex Improvements 250.000 250.000 

Total funds 1,560,658 1.484.658 

Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be 
spent only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Comment: The above projects were recommended for funding in FY2008 by the 
Capital Improvement Committee (CIC). Refer to Appendix E for the complete CIC report. 
Appendix F contains a list of previously approved capital articles, which for various 
reasons remain unspent. These unspent funds will he used to offset the costs of the 
projects identified in this article. 

Voted Article 9 as amended. That this article be approved. 
Unanimous Vote. 



41 



APPENDIX F 



Unspent Articles for Re-use to Fund Capital Improvements 
Recommended in Article 9 



Fiscal Year 
2001 
2001 
2004 
2006 

School Department 



Description 

Fire Proof Trailer 
School Window Shades 
Fire Alarm Upgrade 
Design Services SHS to SMS 



Amount 

24.550.00 
38. 205.00 
72. 753.00 
100.000.00 

$ 235.508.00 



2008 JetVac Combo Truck 

2006 Chassis Sander 

2004 Water Meter Replacement 

Department of Public Works 

Grand Total 



172.668.00 
20.906.00 
70.426.00 

$264.000.00 

$ 499.508.00 



Voted Article 9, Appendix F as amended. 

Unanimous Vote. 

5/7/2007 



That this article be approved. 



42 



ARTICLE 1 0. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by 

borrowing or otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 



No. Purpose Requested Recommended 



School Department 

08-23 Copier Replacement 90,560 

08-24 Window Replacement III (Clarke) 58,333 

08-25 Parking Lot Repairs I (Forest Ave) 142,500 

Department of Public Works 

08-26 Street Signs 25,000 
Police Department 

08-27 Firearms Simulator 45,000 

08-28 Technology Upgrade 35,000 

Fire Department 

08-29 Pumper 400,000 

08-30 Radio Alarm Box Equipment 54,400 

08-31 Upgrade Municipal Alarm System 35,500 

Library 

08-32 Carpeting 30,000 
Emergency Management 

08-33 Equipment and Supplies 50,000 
Recreation 

08-34 Machon Playground Improvements 160,000 

Total funds 1,126,293 

Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be 
spent only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Comment: The above projects were not recommended for funding in FY2008 by the 
Capital Improvement Committee. 



Voted Article 10. That this article be postponed indefinitely. 
IVIajority Vote. 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to repair, 

construct or reconstruct streets, together with all necessary work incidental thereto, including 
engineering, in conjunction with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, under General Laws, 
Chapter 90 or otherwise; and to transfer for this purpose any unexpended balance of 
appropriations voted for this purpose at prior Town Meetings, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Director of Public Works 

Comment: The purpose of this article is to appropriate monies approved by the 
Legislature for highway and traffic safety projects as approved by the Massachusetts 
Highway Department. The monies may be spent for more than one year. 

Voted Article 11. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $1 ,400,000 for Fiscal 2008 

to improve the Town's sewer system and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $1 ,400,000 under MGL c. 44 or any 
other enabling authority; and the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Administrator be 
authorized to contract for and expend any federal, state or State Revolving Fund (SRF) aid 
available for the project, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Administrator 
to submit, on behalf of the Town, any and all applications deemed necessary for grants and/or 
reimbursements from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the United States under any state 
and/or federal programs to receive and accept such grants or reimbursement for this purpose, 
and/or any others in any way connected with the scope of this Article, provided that the amount of 
the authorized borrowing shall be reduced by the amount of such aid received prior to the 
issuance of bonds or notes under this vote and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town 
Administrator be authorized to take any other action necessary to carry out this project., or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Director of Public Works 

Comment: In order for the town to apply for, and spend, a low interest loan from the 
state to make improvements to the town's sewer system that was mandated by the State 
Department of Environmental Protection, Town Meeting has to vote in the affirmative to 
support this article. 

Voted Article 12. That this article be approved. 
Unanimous Vote. 



44 



ARTICLE 1 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $560,266 for Fiscal 2008 to 

improve the Town's water system and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $560,266 under MGL c. 
44 or any other enabling authority and to Issue bonds and notes therefor; and the Board 
of Selectmen and/or the Town Administrator be authorized to contract for and expend 
any federal, state or MWRA aid available for the project, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and/or the Town Administrator to submit, on behalf of the Town, any and all 
applications deemed necessary for grants and/or reimbursements from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the United States under any state and/or federal 
programs to receive and accept such grants or reimbursement for this purpose, and/or 
any others in any way connected with the scope of this Article, provided that the amount 
of the authorized borrowing shall be reduced by the amount of such aid received prior to 
the issuance of bonds or notes under this vote and that the Board of Selectmen and/or 
the Town Administrator be authorized to take any other action necessary to carry out this 
project., or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Director of Public Works 

Comment: In order to receive the Town's share of the allocation. Town Meeting has 
to vote in the affirmative to appropriate the necessary funds. 

Voted Article 13. That this article be approved. 
Unanimous Vote. 



ARTICLE 1 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Job Classification and Salary 

Plan of the Personnel Board Bylaws, as it applies to those positions not covered by collective 
bargaining agreements, and appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowing or otherwise, as 
recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action relative thereto. The proposed 
modified classification schedule can be found in Appendix A. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article will increase the salaries of those positions covered under 
the Personnel Board Bylaws by three percent (3%). 

Voted Article 14. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board Bylaws, 

other than wage and salary classification, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article allows the Town to adopt changes to the Personnel By-Laws, 
new positions created on or after this date will not be eligible for a cost of living increase 
until July 2008. 

Voted Article 1 5. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



45 



ARTICLE 1 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board By-Laws so 

as to reclassify certain existing positions, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any 
action relative thereto. The proposed modified classification schedule can be found in Appendix 
A. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article allows the Town to reclassify positions covered by the 
Personnel By-Laws. 

Voted Article 16. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 1 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by 

borrowing or otherwise, to fund and implement the collective bargaining agreements between the 
Board of Selectmen and the various unions under the Board of Selectmen for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1 , 2007, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining 
agreements. 

Voted Article 17. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 1 8. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by 

borrowing or othenwise, to fund and implement the collective bargaining agreements between the 
School Department personnel and the Town, which includes, but is not limited to, teachers, 
school administrators, custodians, cafeteria workers, and clerical employees for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1, 2007, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining 
agreements. 

Voted Article 18. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 1 9. To see what action the Town will take in relation to the salaries of elected 

Town Officials for the ensuing year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The statutes require that the Town vote to fix salaries of elected Officers 
annually. The appropriation is in Article 26. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to fix salaries as follows: 

Constable $100 

Voted Article 19. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



46 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to transfer unexpended balances as 

shown on the books of the Town Accountant as of June 30, 2006, to the Surplus Revenue 
Accounts, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This is a routine article to make use of funds, which were appropriated in 
prior fiscal years but not spent. Generally, such funds have been appropriated under 
Articles, other than the general budget, since unspent budget monies "expire" at the end 
of the year and become free cash. 

Voted Article 20. That this article be indefinitely postponed. 
IVIajority Vote. 



ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer funds from various Town 

accounts which have monies remaining therein to such other Town accounts which reflect a 
deficit, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to "capture " unexpended funds, which will 
remain in the various Town accounts as of June 30, 2007, which is the end of the fiscal 
year. Such monies could automatically flow into the Town's free cash, but would be not 
available to reduce the tax rate until the succeeding fiscal year, i.e., beginning July 1 , 
2008. These funds have already been appropriated and have been reflected in our 
current tax bills. 

Voted Article 21. That this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue 

Account of the Town to the account of Current Revenue a sum of money to be used and applied 
by the Board of Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It 
results from the difference between estimates and actual receipts of departmental 
collections and revenues (such as licenses, permits, etc.) plus unexpended funds from 
departmental budgets. When uncollected taxes are subtracted from surplus revenue, the 
total is "Free Cash". This is normally surplus revenue available for Town Meeting to be 
used to reduce taxes for the coming year. 

Voted Article 22. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



47 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the Council 

on Aging Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Council on Aging and used for the 
deposit of receipts collected through public donations; and further to allow the Council on Aging to 
expend funds not to exceed $25,000 for fiscal year 2008 from said account for ongoing supplies 
and equipment. This would be contingent upon an annual report from the Council on Aging to the 
Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to promote good fiscal responsibility through 
the continuation of a petty cash account of monies received and paid out. The Council 
on Aging would also have the responsibility of reporting to the Town the total receipts and 
expenditures through this account each fiscal year. 

Voted Article 23. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the 

Recycling - Blue Bins Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Health Department 
and used for the deposit of receipts collected through the sale of recycling bins; and further to 
allow the Health Department to expend funds not to exceed $5,000 for fiscal year 2008 from said 
account for ongoing supplies and equipment. This would be contingent upon an annual report 
from the Health Department to the Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account 
each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to allow funds received from recycling 
activities (e.g., sale of recycling bins) to be used solely for additional recycling and health 
activities. The Health Department would also have the responsibility of reporting to the 
Town the total receipts and expenditures through this account each fiscal year. 

Voted Article 24. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of a Recreation 

Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Town Administrator and used for the deposit 
of receipts collected through user fees of recreation programs; and further, to allow the Town 
Administrator to expend funds not to exceed $100,000 for fiscal year 2008 from said account for 
ongoing supplies, salaries and equipment. This would be contingent upon an annual report from 
the Recreation Department to the Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account 
each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to allow funds received from recreation 
activities to be used solely for additional recreation activities. The Town 
Administrator/Recreation Department would also have the responsibility of reporting to 
the Town the total receipts and expenditures through this account each fiscal year. 

Voted Article 25. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



48 



i 



ARTICLE 26. To act on the report of the Finance Committee on the Fiscal Year 2008 

budget and to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds money for the operation of 
the Town's Departments and the payment of debt service and all other necessary and proper 
expenses for the year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Finance Committee 

Comment: The Finance Committee's recommendation will be the initial motion on 
the floor to deal with this budget. The budget as printed here will be amended to reflect 
any changes voted at this Town Meeting. The Moderator has traditionally allowed for 
discussion and reconsideration of each line item within this budget individually and in any 
order. 

Voted Article 26. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will transfer $147,000 from the Assessor's Overlay 

Surplus Account of the Town to the account of Current Revenue to be used and applied by the 
Board of Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: These funds have been deemed surplus and can be used as a revenue 
source to balance the budget. 

Voted Article 27. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue 

Account of the Water Enterprise Fund to the account of Current Revenue the sum of $200,000 to 
be used and applied by the Board of Selectmen in the reduction of the water rate, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It 
results from the difference between estimates and actual receipts of water user fees and 
other revenues plus unexpended funds from the water department's budget. This is 
normally surplus revenue available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce rates for the 
coming year. 

Voted Article 28. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



49 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue 

Account of the Sewer Enterprise Fund to the account of Current Revenue the sum of $150,000 to 
be used and applied by the Board of Selectmen in the reduction of the sewer rate, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It 
results from the difference between estimates and actual receipts of sewer user fees and 
other revenues plus unexpended funds from the sewer department's budget. This is 
normally surplus revenue available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce rates for the 
coming year. 

Voted Article 29. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the 

Town Administrator to enter into a contract not to exceed to twenty-five years to lease the spaces 
on the second floor and lofts of the Swampscott Fish House, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Currently the Fish House second floor and lofts are leased to the 
Swampscott Yacht Club for a period of five years, with an option for a five year extension. 
This article would allow the Town to publicly procure a lease for a lease period not to 
exceed twenty five years creating stability for the occupant of the building. 

Voted Article 30. That this article be approved. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 31 . To see if Town will vote to approve the Swampscott Retirement Board's 

acceptance of the provisions of Section 2 Chapter 157 of the Acts of 2005, which provides a one- 
time payment to those members of the Swampscott Retirement System who retired for accidental 
disability and who are veterans, with said allowance to be equal to $15 per year, for a maximum 
of 20 years of service, not to exceed $300 in any calendar year, retroactive to the members' date 
of retirement, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by William Wollersheid, et al. 

Voted Article 31. That this article be Indefinitely postponed. 
Majority Vote. 



50 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management 

and control of the land formerly known as Temple Israel and located at 837 Humphrey Street, 
Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as; Map 29, lots 4 and 3A, from the Board 
of Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is currently held to the Board of Selectmen for 
purposes of sale and to authorize the Chief Procurement Officer to sell the parcels of land at a 
minimum price of $3,350,000, per the provisions of Massachusetts General Law Chapter 30B, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This article provides the Selectmen and the Town Administrator the 
authority to sell the former Temple Israel building. 

Voted Article 32. That this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Majority Vote. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management 

and control of the land formerly known as the Swampscott Middle School and located at 71 
Greenwood Avenue, Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as; Map 19, lot 87, 
from the Board of Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is currently held to the Board of 
Selectmen for purposes of sale and to authorize the Chief Procurement Officer to sell the parcel 
of land per the provisions of Massachusetts General Law Chapter 30B, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This article provides the Selectmen and the Town Administrator the 
authority to sell the former Temple Israel building. 



Voted Article 33. That this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Majority Vote. 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise, by borrowing or 

otherwise, under any general or special law which authorizes the Town to raise money, by 
borrowing or otherwise, such sums of money as may be necessary for any and all of the 
purposes mentioned in the foregoing articles, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Voted Article 34. That this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Majority Vote. 



51 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant witli your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hand this 1 1th day of April, 2007 




3252 



Abrams, Alan 


20 Jessie St 


X 


X 


Baldacci, Richard R 


43 Sampson Ave 


X 


X 


Barbuzzi, Pamela Ann 


185 Winder Ave 


X 




Bartlett-Genest Lee 


47 Elwin St 


X 


X 


Batchelder Kathleen 


33 The Greenway 


X 




Bates, Wallace T. 


73 Foster Rd 


X 


X 


Blonder, Jeffrey S 


15 Shackle Way "~ 


X 


X 


iBuchanan, Susan 


84 Roy St 


X 


X 


^Byron-Adams Michelle 


20 Jessie St 




X 


Chavez, Robert 


48 Jessie St 


X 


X 


Chouinard Leah 


12 Overhill Rd 


X 




Condon Linda 


41 Nichols St 


X 




Cresta, Gino A Jr 


76 Windsor Ave 




X 


Cropley, John H. Jr. 


14 Tidd St 






Dandreo, Robert 


28 Vaughan PI 


X 


X 


Davis Jeremy 


1008 Paradise Rd IE 


X 


X 


Delano, Ted 


110 Eastman Ave 






DiPietro, Ross 


63 The Greenway 






Doyle, Candace 


110 Eastman Ave 






Finlay Patricia 


57 Sampson Ave 


X 




Hartmann, Eric 


39 Nichols St 


X 


X 


Hartmann, Marianne 


39 Nichols St 


X 


X 


Hayes, Jeanne 


21 Ryan PI 




X 


Hubauer, Shawn 


100 Burpee Rd 






Hyde, Sally A 


10 Overhill Rd 


X 


X 


Hyde, William RSr 


10 Overhill Rd 


X 


X 


Johnson Maryalice 


49 Windsor Ave 


X 


X 


Keamey Sheila 


14 Shackle Way 




X 


Keay Maralyn 


3 Hawser Ln 


X 




Kessler, Nelson 


1002 Paradise Rd 


X 


X 


LeBlanc Dean 


20 The Greenway 


X 


X 


Lombard James 


7 Tidd St 




X 


Losano, Paul 


33 Carson Ter 


X 


X 


Lucas, Tom 


55 Elwin St 


X 




Maher William 


2 Martin St 






Marston, Denise 


46 Sampson Ave 




X 


Miles, Chris 


7 Fisher Ave 


X ~" 


X 


Miles, Denise 


7 Fisher Ave 


X 




Montague, Neil 


14 Capstan Way 




X 


Patrikis, Theodore A. 


1006 Paradise Rd 


X 


X 


Picariello, John A 


53 Carson Ter 


X 


X 


Picariello, Lawrence 


40 Eastman Ave 


X 


X 


Pierce Kimberly 74 Buena Vista 


X 




Pierce Todd 74 Buena Vista 


X 


X 


Powell Sally 


65 Carson Ter 


X 


X 


Rizzo, Carole 


18 Nichols St 


X 


X 


Rooks, Norma H 


406 Paradise Rd PHK 


X 


X 


Schultz, Hugh (Jim) 


1 Alvin Rd 


X 


X 


Serine, Michael A 


99 Burpee Rd 


X 




Shannon Cynthia 


4 Palleschi Dr 


X 


X 


Speranza, Frances 


1 Martin Way 


X 


X 


Wheeler, Matt 68 Sampson Ave 






Whittier, Douglas 


1 Bickford Way 


X 


X 


Wu Heng Sien 


110 Foster Rd 








ABSENT 


14 


18 




PERCENT PRESENt 


74% 


66% 



53 













Pre Wame ^ ; s. xs 


Address : ^-,.^.>-.jfc^4^^d£.^^ .r^jiuit- 




2 


Bacik Lisa Carrigan 


48 Grant Rd 






2 


Barden, Eugene 


316 Paradise Rd 


- - 


X 


2 


Blonder Susan 


39 Barnstable St 






2 


Bowen, David 


109 Norfolk Ave 


X 


X 


2 


Cameron. Janell A 


97 Farragut Rd 


X 


X 


2 


Caron, Mark R 


77 Franklin Ave 


X 


X 


2 


Cassidy, Tim 


19 Bamstable St 




1 


2 


Crimmins Joseph 


68 Walker Rd 


- 

X 


X 


2 


Curry, Martha 


15 Banks Rd 


X 


X 


2 


Doherty, John J 


5 Ellis Rd 


X 


X 


2 


Dunn Larry 


145 Stetson Ave 






2 


Dunn, Judith F 


145 Stetson Ave 


X 


X 


2 


Eichler, Tanis 


95 Farragut Rd 


X 




2 


Giangregorio Richard 


4 Belleair Dr 




X 


2 


Gioiosa, Keliie 


137 Paradise Rd 


- 




2 


Hamel, Greg 


10 Oakledge Rd 


- 

X 




2 


Hamilton Bruce 


1 03 Stetson Ave 




X 


2 


Hebert, Donald 


2 Summit View Dr 


X 


X 


2 


Hebert, Janet 


2 Summit View Dr 


X 


X 


2 


Hunt Stephen 


8 Grant Rd 


X 


X 


2 


Jackson, Lorene 


1 1 Longwood Dr 


X 


X 


2 


Jackson, William 


1 1 Longwood Dr 


X 


X 


2 


Locke, Jonathan 


39 Berkshire St 






Z 


Marcou, Martha L 


80 Franklin St 


X 


X 


2 


McCaffery Rose 


101 Norfolk Ave 




X 


2 


McHugh, Donna 


21 Eastman Ave 


X 


X 




McLaugnhn John 


63 Stetson Ave 






2 


Morrell, Agatha 


21 Banks Rd 


_ 

X 


X 


2 


Mulvey Edward 


^ ^ k 1 C 1 1 A 

110 Norfolk Ave 


X 




2 


Murphy, Brian C 


55 Prospect St 






2 


Newriall, Linda A 


14 Nantucket Ave 


- 

X 


X 


2 


Newhall, Walter 


14 Nantucket Ave 


X 


X 


2 


Palleschi, Edward A 


1 Ellis Rd 






I 


rinkerton, Don 


15 Banks Rd 


X 


X 


Z 


ritman, Michael 


164 Walker Rd 


X 


X 


d. 


Ramstine, Patricia Karamas 


173 Paradise Rd 


X 


X 


I. 


Keardon, biien M 


kl.^. 11^ A... 

82 Norfolk Ave 


X 


X 


2. 


Richmond, uavid c 


6 Swampscott Ave 


X 


X 


i. 


Romano, John L 


2 Paton Ter 


X 


X 


2. 


Rosenberg, (jail 


56 Middlesex Ave 


X 


X 




Ruggiero John 


48 Franklin Ave 


X 


X 




Ryan Leah 


16 Duke Rd 


X 


X 




bchuitz, Jackson 


23 Hampden St 




X 


2. 


ocibelli, Anthony A 


27 Longwood Dr 


X 


X 


o 
Z 


Shanahan, Joseph E Jr 


4 Paton Ter 






Z 


bpntz Wayne 


91 Farragut Rd 


X 


X 


Z 


Strauss, Danielle 


15 Duke St 


X 


X 


z 


Strauss, Mathew 


15 Duke St 


X 


X 


z 


vogei Knsten 


60 Middlesex Ave 




X 


z 


vogei, John 


60 Middlesex Ave 


. . 

X 




2 


Whalen, Michael 


50 Worcester Ave 


X 


X 




Wheian David Jr 


131 Paradise Rd 


X 


X 


2 


Zamansky Elizabeth Belkin 


51 Prospect St 




X 


2 












1 


- 










ABSENT 


17 


14 






rcRCcNT PREScNT 


DO% 


74% 



39 Grant Rd 
42 Walker Ave 
47 Paradise Rd 

47 Paradise Rd 
20 Beach Ave 
37 Farragut Rd 
32 Hillcrest Cir 

32 Hillcrest Cir 

59 Norfolk Ave 
51 TInomas Rd 
46 Rock Ave 
51 Beach Ave 
30 Hillcrest Ave 
28 Burpee Rd 

28 Burpee Rd 

2 Upland Rd 
15 Maple Ave 
15 Maple Ave 

18 Walker Rd 
4 Burpee Ter 

3 Grant Rd 

12 Hillcrest Cir 

42 Thomas Rd 

43 Maple Ave 

33 Norfolk Ave 

86 Chen7 St 

1 1 Outlook Rd 
3 Ellis Rd 
251 Bumll St 
36 Burpee Rd 
1 1 Beach Ave 
164 Burrill St 
164 Burrill St 
9 Valley Rd 

29 Andrew Rd 

1 9 Essex St 
51 Norfolk Ave 

9 New Ocean St 
103 Burpee Rd 

87 Pine St 

60 Burpee Rd 

19 Thomas Rd 

20 Superior St 
32 Andrew Rd 
20 Superior St 
22 Burpee Rd 
7 Outlook Rd 
71 Thomas Rd 
199 Burrill Ave 

48 Thomas Rd 
7 Elmwood Rd 
58 Essex St 

1 1 Hardy Rd 
48 Thomas Rd 



ABSENT 

PERCENT PRESENT 



4 


Anderson Dana 


74 Aspen Rd 






4 


Baker, Janet N 


29 Rockland St 


X 


X 


4 


Balsama, Joseph J 


23 Sherwood Rd 


X 


X 


4 


|Barden, Marc 


377 Forest Ave 


X 


X 


4 


Bonazzoli, Paula 


359 Forest Ave 


X 


X 


4 


Brown Rachel 


99 Banks Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Brown, Andrew 


99 Banks Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Cunningham, Kelly 


52 Greenwood Ave 


X 


X 


4 


Dawley Thomas 


137 Redington St 


X 


X 


4 


DeChillo, Mary H 


7 Rockland St 




X 


4 


DiMento, William R 


64 Bay View Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Donelan, Robert E 


295 Forest Ave 






4 


Donnenfeld Neil 


66 Lexington Cir 


X 




4 


Drummond, Brian 


153 Redington St 


X 


X 


4 


Drummond, Ellen M 


153 Redington St 


X 


X 


4 


Faico, Michael 


142 Redington St 


X 


X 


4 


Goldman, Iris 


24 Sheridan Rd 




X 


4 


Goudreau, Connie 


61 Greenwood Ave 


X 


X 


4 


Hughes, Nancy 


8 Brooks Ter 


X 




4 


Johnson, Anne 


96 Magnolia Rd _ 


X 


X 


4 


Jurma, Jer 


146 Elmwood Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Kane Richard M Jr 


81 King St 






4 


Keeter Terri 


66 Sherwood Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Kraft, Richard 


146 Elmwood Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Krippendorf, Edward W. Sr 


1 1 Mapledale PI 


X 


X 


4 


Leger, Jeanne 


58 Redington St 


X 


X 


4 


Lord, Gary 


10 Pine Hill Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Lord, Nancy 


10 Pine Hill Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Madigan, Elizabeth 


4 Sheridan Ter 






4 


McBurney Michelle 


92 Fuller Ave 


X 


X 


4 


McClung Michael 


64 Fuller Ave 


X 


X 


4 


Mcenaney, John T 


18 Sargent Rd 


X 


X 


4 


McNerney, Cynthia 


374 Humphrey St 


X 




4 


Meninno, Christine 


13 Supreme Ct 


X 


X 


4 


Morretti, Nunzio "Butch" 


107 Aspen Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Moynihan, John 


27 Rockland St 






4 


Nugent Robert 


69 Magnolia Rd 


X 


X 


4 


O'Brien, Laurie 


11 Fuller Ave 


X 


X 


4 


Phelan John V IV 


75 Banks Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Phelan, John V III 


75 Banks Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Poska Matthew 


58 Magnolia Rd 






4 


Powell, Amy 


70 Fuller Ave 


X 


X 


4 


Reagan, John 


25 Brooks Ter 


X 




4 


Santanello, Daniel 


6 Supreme Ct 


X 


X 


4 


Sarafini-Foley Phyllis 


59 Millett Rd 




X 


4 


Shanahan, Patricia D 


48 King St 




X 


4 


Sheehan Neil G 


26 Mapledale PI 


X 


X 


4 


Shore Geraldine 


50 Ocean View Rd 


X 




4 


Somer, Margaret 


32 Bay View Ave 


X 




4 


Stone, Myron S 


15 Bay View Ave 


X 


X 


4 


Vaucher, Catherine M 


1 4 Devens Rd 


X 


X 


4 


Walsh, Karyn LK 


21 Lexington Cir 


X 


X 


4 


Withrow, Marysusan Buckley 


27 Greenwood Ave 


X 




4 


Wynne, Katie 


373 Forest Ave 


X 


X 
















ABSENT 


10 


13 






PERCENT PRESENT 


81% 


75% 













56 



Akim, Marta 


-nviui^O^ 7?"' 

10 Glen Rd 


X 




Belhumeur, Cynthia Hatch 


100 Galloupes Pt Rd 


X 


X 


Belhumeur, R. Thomas 


100 Galloupes Pt Rd 






Bernstein, Neil 


15 Pine Hill Rd 


X 


X 


Brooks, Gerald 


41 Beverly Rd 






Callahan, Michael 


10 Smith Ln 


X 


X 


Caplan, Edward 


26 Laurel Rd 


X 


X 


Carangelo, Lisa 


31 Lincoln House Pt 


X 


X 


Carr, Heather 


385 Puritan Rd 


X 


X 


Cerra Anthony J 


15 Sargent Rd 


X 


X 


Chapman, Randy 


408 Puritan Rd 


X 




Connolly Loretta 


67 Ocean View Rd 


X 


X 


Devlin, Michael K 


23 Puritan Ln 


X 


X 


Fonnan Amy 


81 Bates Rd 


X 


X 


Forman, Adam 


81 Bates Rd 


X 


X 


Garner Ronald 


38 Gale Rd 






Graham, David 


7 Juniper Rd 


X 




Grant, Kenneth 


471 Humphrey St 


X 


X 


Hartmann, Jill 


40 Glen Rd 


X 


X 


Hodgkin, Doreen L 


8 Puritan Ln 


X 




Hyman, Merle 


25 Pine Hill Rd 


X 


X 


Jaffe, Sharon Tripolsky 


105 Shelton Rd 


X 




kan/vowski, John R 


2 Prospect Ave 


X 


X 


Keller, Ellen Long 


73 Ocean View Rd 


X 




Lawler, Jack 


6 Gale Rd 


X 


X 


Lawler, Sami 


6 Gale Rd 


X 


X 


Lipson Philip 


2 Robin Ln 




X 


MacDonald, Matthew 


193 Forest Ave 






Nellis, Veeder C 


16 Beverly Rd 


X 


X 


O'Neill, Thomas 


62 Sculpin Way 


X 


X 


Patkin, Marjorie 


32 Ross Rd 


X 




Patkin, Randall 


34 Ross Road 


X 




Pye, Darlene 


62 Ocean View Rd 


X 


X 


Reardon, Carl 


25 Glen Rd 


X 




Rogers, Roberta C 


31 Beverly Rd 


X 


X 


Rooks, Ruth 


119 Puritan Ln 


X 


X 


Rossman Neil 


455 Puritan Rd 


X 


X 


Rubin, Gayle 


57 Lincoln House Pt 


X 


X 


Sneirson, Gerald 


339 Puritan Rd 


X 


X 


Spartos, Mary Anne 


704 Humphrey St 






Steinman, Roy H 


129 Galloupes Pt 






Stephens, Thomas J 


63 Kensington Ln 






Sullivan, Jill 


43 Lincoln House Pt 


X 


X 


Talkov, Roger 


16 Ross Rd 


X 




Toner, Colleen 


80 Sargent Rd 


X 


X 


Van dam David 8 


396 Puritan Rd 


X 


X 


Vanderburg, Joanne 


152 Puritan Rd 


X 


X 


Vanderburg, Linso 


152 Puritan Rd 


X 


X 


Vatcher, Howard 


65 Pleasant St 


X 




Weiner, Lawrence J 


1 1 Walnut Rd 






Wilson, Catherine E 


55 Shelton Rd 


X 


X 


Zarinsky, Irma W Dr 


21 Sutton PI 


X 


X 


Zeller, David E 


37 Walnut Rd 


X 


X 


Zeller, Virginia 


37 Walnut Rd 


X 


X 












ABSENT 


9 


19 




PERCENT PRESENT 


83% 


64% 











57 



6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 



Baker, Robert A 
Beermann, Jack M 
Belkin, Sylvia B 
Block Lawrence S 
Block, Ina-Lee 
Burgess, Sue 
Burke, Scott 
Carroll, William 
Cassidy, Reid J 
'Cronin, Michael 
Cronin, Tammy 
Dembowski, Claire C 
Doherty-Healy Mary 
Driscoll, Thomas H Jr. Esq 
Drucas, Chris 
Eriich Norman 
Frisch, Peter 
Gold, Anne W 
Goldberg, Arthur 
Goldman, Jeff 
Goldman, Martin C 
Gupta, Mary Kelly 
Healey, Thomas J 
Jacobs, Susan 
Kane John C. Jr 
Kane, Susan 
Kravtin-Horwitz Patricia 
Levenson, Paul E Esq 
Levenson, Sheryl 
Locke, Judith E 
Markarian, Joe 
Merkle, Cynthia 
O'Hare, Mary Michael 
Paster Ruth 
Paster, Marc 
Pelletier, Maria 
Pitman, Martha 
Poster, Eugene L 
Rotner, Kim 
Rotner, Philip 
Ryan, Daniel 
Ryan, Mary Ann 
Ryan, William 
Sackett, Shelley A 
Seligman, Edward 
Shutzer, Carole B 
Shutzer, Kenneth B 
Walker, Eric 
Walsh Kerin 
Watson Brian T 
Whitman, Andrew 8 
Witt, Sherri L. 
Yaeger, Dan 
Yaeger, Lisa L 



75 Stanley Rd 
9 Sumner St 
35 Beach Bluff Ave 
48 Crosman Ave 
48 Crosman Ave 
57 Atlantic Ave 

44 Longley Ave 
33 Morton Rd 

24 Crosman Ave 

25 Manton Rd 

45 Manton Rd 

42 Beach Bluff Ave 
25 Harrison Ave 
28 Crosman Ave 

56 Bradlee Ave 
63 Linden Ave 

20 Mostyn St 
79 Bradlee Ave 
180 Bradlee Ave 
6 Allen Rd 

3 Ingraham Ter 
48 Atlantic Ave 
25 Harrison Ave 

21 Crossman Ave 
28 Puritan Pk 

28 Puritan Pk 

57 Phillips Ave 
63 Shepard Ave 
83 Shepard Ave 
15 Dennison Ave 

22 Nason Rd 
44 Dale St 
24 Manton Rd 
6 Brown Rd 

6 Brown Rd 
1 1 Brown Rd 

23 Nason Rd 
61 Nason Rd 
44 Lincoln Cir 
44 Lincoln Cir 
53 Lincoln Cir 
85 Morton Rd 
85 Morton Rd 
116 Ocean Ave 
13 Young Ave 

1 Salem St 

1 Salem St 

2 Palmer Ave 

37 Estabrook Rd 

38 Stan wood Rd 
19 Puritan Pk 

4 Crosman Ave 
131 Walker Rd 
131 Walker Rd 

ABSENT 

PERCENT PRESENT 
OVERALL 



X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X^ 

X^ 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 
X 

X^ 

X 

X 

X_ 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 
X 



_x^ 
)^ 

X 



X 

X 

X 

x_ 

X 



x^ 

X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

8 

85% 

77% 



J< 
X^ 
X 
X 
X. 

X 

X 

X_ 
X 



83% 



73% 



58 



TOWN COLLECTOR and COLLECTOR OF TAXES 


Demise M. Dembkoski 











llN AUUUUN 1 Wl 1 n 1 Mb 1 UWiN Ur oWAMroUU 1 


- U^/U1/Uo 1 U UO/oU/Uf 






COLLcCrTIUNo: 










Real Estate Taxes 


<t Oyl ceo "ICO 4 


rersonai rroperiy i axes 


q> OoO.ooU.yU 


1 ax 1 itie/ueTerrea i ax collections 


H) l,byo,4o/.04 


Automobile Excise Taxes 


q> z,Uz7,44z.bo 


Water/Sewer Collections 


O Oyl"7 ceo Oft 


Harbor Mooring Fees 


<t »1 7 COC /I ft 

1 / ,bzb.4U 


Boat Excise Taxes 


(t -1 O Cft>l 07 






Note. 




Interest/chdrges/demdnd fees are included in dbove figures 








Rentals (risn House, C&L, Yacht Club) 


07 OOO ftft 


iNUii'^^uiur luuiury rxcir i luur bci iiciiio 


<t 97 QQ7 CO 


Cell Tower Leases 


$ 48,658.42 






Fees for preparing Certificates of Municipal Lien 


$ 12,840.00 






Total Collected - July 1, 2006 to June 30, 2007 


$ 42,815,405.35 



59 



TREASURER 

Denise M. Dembkoski 



Treasurer's Cash Statement 

In account with the Town of Swampscott: 

Balance on hand July 1 , 2006: $1 5,953,042 

Receipts and income from all sources: $123,856,221 

Less wan-ants paid (payroll and vendor): ($126,603,090) 

Balance on hand June 30, 2007: $13,206,174 

Interest income earned 07/01/06 - 06/30/07: $667,988 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT TRUST AND SPECIAL FUNDS 

Balance Deposits Interest Withdrawals Balance 

07/01/06 06/30/07 

Cemetery Gifts & Bequeaths $77,292 $2,384 $79,676 

Cemetery Perpetual Care $430,459 $12,200 $13,215 ($50,000) $405,874 

Library - General Library Trust $72,774 $2,000 $2,245 ($23,801) $53,218 

Library - Linscott Trust $65,632 $2,042 ($11,742) $55,932 

Library - Hussey Trust $42,760 $1,319 ($9,036) $35,042 

Library - Johnson Tnjst $47 $1 $49 

Stabilization Account $390,924 $36,977 $14,503 $442,404 

Conservation Fund $87,523 $2,173 $2,675 $92,372 

Phillips Medal $3,051 $94 $3,145 

MWRA Program $29,075 $897 $29,972 

Performance Bonds $63,248 ($7,000) $56,248 

War Memorial Fund $118,724 $175 $3,662 ($4,400) $118,161 

Totals $1,381,509 $53,525 $43,037 ($105,979) $1,372,092 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Denise M. Dembkoski 
Treasurer 



60 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



For the Fiscal Year Ending 2007 the Town of Swampscott had to comply with Governmental 
Accounting Standards Boards Statement 34 for fixed assets. The Town had an inventory done in 
June 2002 for all assets valued over $1,000 with the Town's threshold for GASB34 being $15,000. 
We were also required to operate Enterprise Funds for Water and Sewer. The Funds are now 
known as Proprietary Funds. 

The following is the Fiscal Year 2007-year end Governmental Funds Balance Sheet, 
Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balances for Governmental Funds, 
Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance (Budget and Actual) 
Governmental Funds, Statement of Net Assets for Governmental Funds, Statement of Net Assets for 
Proprietary Funds, Statement of Revenue, Expenses and Changes in Net Assets for Proprietary 
Funds, Statement of Fiduciary Net Assets, Statement of Changes in Fiduciary Net Assets and the 
July 1 , 2007 Free Cash and Update Letter from the Department of Revenue. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

David Castellarin 
Town Accountant 



61 



GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 
BALANCE SHEET 



JUNE 30, 2007 



ASSETS General 

Cash and cash equivalents $ 2,099,723 $ 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 

Real estate and personal property taxes 1,019,599 

Tax liens 249,499 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 193,962 

Departmental and other 31,453 

Intergovernmental 471,123 

Due from other funds 1,042,321 

Restricted assets: 

Cash and cash equivalents - 

TOTAL ASSETS $ 5,107,680 $_ 

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES 
LIABILITIES: 

Warrants payable $ 373,379 $ 

Accrued payroll 48,271 

Other habihties 483,666 

Deferred revenue 1,744,153 

Due to other funds 

Accrued short-term interest 151,570 

Short-term notes payable -_ 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 2,801,039 

FUND BALANCES: 
Reserved for: 

Encumbrances and continuing appropriations 106,804 

Perpetual permanent funds 

Other specific purposes 

Unreserved: 

Designated for subsequent year's expenditures 500,000 

Undesignated, reported in: 

General fund 1,699,837 

Special revenue funds 

Capital projects funds 

Permanent funds - 

TOTAL FUND BALANCES 2,306,641 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES $ 5,107,680 $ 



Stabilization Capital Articles 



442,403 $ 



442,403 $ 



442,403 



442,403 



4,412,467 



4,412,467 



86,136 



86,136 



4,326,331 



4,326,331 



442,403 $ 



4,412,467 



See notes to basic finemcial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



Basic Financial Statements 



62 



New High School 




Nonmajor 
Governmental 
Funds 




Total 
Governmental 
Funds 




$ 


1,435,088 


$ 


3,977,214 


5,082,223 




273,461 
524,036 




1,019,599 
249,499 
193,962 
31,453 
5,826,807 
1,042,321 

4,936,503 


5,082,223 


$ 


2,232,585 


$ 


17,277,358 


5,082,223 
1,042,321 

7,986,000 


$ 


39,221 
5,268 


$ 


498,736 
53,539 

483,666 
6,826,376 
1,042,321 

151,570 
7,986,000 






AA AQQ 






- 
_ 




466,832 
752,061 

_ 




106^04 
466,832 
752,061 

500,000 


(9,028,321) 




912,000 
57,203 




1,699,837 
1,354,403 
(4,701,990) 
57,203 


(9,028,321) 




2,188,096 




235,150 


5,082,223 


$ 


2,232,585 


$ 


17,277,358 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts ' Basic Financial Statements 



63 



GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2007 



General 



REVENUES 

Real estate and personal property taxes $ 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 

Tax liens 

Payments in lieu of taxes 

Charges for services 

Intergovernmental 

Penalties and interest on taxes 

Licenses, permits and fees 

Fines and forfeitures 

Departmental 

Contributions 

Investment income 

TOTAL REVENUES 

EXPENDITURES 
Current: 

General government 

Pubhc safety 

Education 

Public works 

Health and human services , 

Culture and recreation 

Pension benefits 

Employee benefits 

Property and liability insurance 

State and county charges 

Debt service: 

Principal 

Interest 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES 

OVER EXPENDITURES 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) 

Transfers in 

Proceeds of bonds and notes 

Premium from issuance of bonds and notes 

Transfers out 

TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) 

NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCES 

FUND BALANCES AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 

FUND BALANCES AT END OF YEAR $ 



34,816,855 
1,993,056 
66,567 
8,075 

8,016,439 
133,448 

1,641,936 
125,358 
490,204 



Stabilization Capital Articles 
- $ 



671,019 


14,503 




47,962,957 


14,503 


- 


1,716,771 




2,909,952 


5,708,842 


- 


121,819 


91 941 418 




546 412 


919,954 


- 


275,475 


1,087,885 






622,910 




236,615 


6,485,889 






4,831,714 






312,095 






524,783 






2,300,892 






1,542,338 






47,295,491 




4,090,273 


667,466 


14,503 


(4,090,273) 


575,000 


36,977 


50,000 






2,429,000 


81,208 






(1,076,706) 




(525,000) 


(420,498) 


36,977 


1,954,000 


246,968 


51,480 


(2,136,273) 


2,059,673 


390,923 


6,462,604 


2,306,641 $ 


442,403 $ 


4,326,331 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



Basic Financial Statements 



64 





Nonmajor 


Total 




Governmental 


Governmental 


New High School 


Funds 


Funds 


- $ 


- $ 


34,816,855 






1,993,056 






66,567 






8,075 




1,430,716 


1,430,716 


52,915 


2,043,691 


10,113,045 






133,448 




212,089 


1,854,025 






1 25,358 




357,379 


847,583 


33,212 


36,318 


69,530 


* 


28,535 


714,057 


86,127 


4,108,728 


52,172315 


- 


167,966 


4,794,689 




501,285 


6,331,946 


11,826,126 


2,634,778 


36,248,734 




309,916 


1,505,345 


- 


44,490 


1,132,375 




130,009 


989,534 






6,485,889 


- 




4,831,714 






312,095 




- 


524,783 






2300,892 






1,542,338 


11,826,126 


3,788,444 


67,000,334 


(11,739,999) 


320,284 


(14,828,019) 


661,547 


64,367 


1,387,891 






2,429,000 






81,208 




(275,914) 


(1,877,620) 


661,547 


(211,547) 


2,020,479 


(11,078,452) 


108,737 


(12,807,540) 


2,050,131 


2,079,359 


13,042,690 


(9,028,321) $ 


2,188,096 $ 


235,150 



Toivn of Swampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



65 



GENERAL FUND 

SCHEDULE OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
BUDGET AND ACTUAL 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2007 
Prior Year 





Encumbrances 




Supplemental 








and Continuing 


Original 


Appropriations 


Final 






Appropriations 


Budget 


and Transfers 


Budget 


Actual 


REVENUES 












Real estate and personal property taxes 


.. $ - i 


34,972,481 $ 


240,441 $ 


35,212,922 $ 


34,721,230 


Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 




1,873,790 


- 


1,873,790 


1,993,056 


Tax and utility liens 




- 


- 


- 


66,567 


Payments in lieu of taxes 


- 


8,075 


- 


8,075 


8,075 


Intergovernmental 


• • 


4,101,929 


- 


4,101,929 


4,269,602 


Penalties and interest on taxes 


- 


90,000 


- 


90,000 


133,448 


Licenses, permits and fees 


- 


1,641,525 


- 


1,641,525 


1,641,936 




• • 


95,000 


- 


95,000 


93,905 


Departmental 


- 


468,840 


- 


468,840 


517,819 


Investment income 


• • 


383,100 


- 


383,100 


671,019 


TOTAL REVENUES 


- 


43,634,740 


240,441 


43,875,181 


44,116,657 


EXPENDITURES 












Current: 












General government 


7,430 


1,635,228 


(15,720) 


1,626,938 


1,712,249 


Public safety 


10,841 


5,504,538 


198,589 


5,713,968 


5,715,685 




258,782 


21,007,412 


(2,575) 


21,263,619 


21,241,381 




• • 


1,023,171 


(81,345) 


941,826 


913,669 


Health and human services 


1,973 


1,113,708 


(28,620) 


1,087,061 


1,087,060 


Culture and recreation 




624,540 


(3,287) 


621,253 


621,115 


Pension benefits 


- ■ 


2,742,135 


(1,637) 


2,740,498 


2,738,740 


Employee benefits 


- 


4,648,125 


180,684 


4,828,809 


4,831,714 


Property and liability insurance 


• 


315,000 


- 


315,000 


312,095 


State and county charges 




542,143 




542,143 


524,783 


Debt service: 
















2,229,574 


354 


2,229,928 


2,300,892 






2,406,750 


(6,002) 


2,400,748 


2,246,809 


TOTAL EXPENDITURES 


279,026 


43,792,324 


240,441 


44,311,791 


44,246,192 


EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES 












OVPR pypPMT^rn tppc 


(279,026) 


/I e "7 COA\ 

(157,584) 




(436,610) 


(129,535) 


OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) 












Transfers in 




575,000 




575,000 


575,000 


Premium from issuance of bonds and notes 










81,208 


Transfers out 




(1,076,706) 




(1,076,706) 


(1,076,706) 


TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES). . . 




(501,706) 




(501,706) 


(420,498) 


NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCE 


(279,026) 


(659,290) 




(938,316) 


(550,033) 


FUND BALANCE AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 


2,835,035 


2,835,035 


2,835,035 


2,835,035 


2,835,035 


FUND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR 


$ 2,556,009 $ 


2,175,745 $ 


2,835,035 $ 


1,896,719 $ 


2,285,002 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



66 



Required Supplementary Information 



Current Year 


Actual and 




Encumbrances 


Encumbrances 


Variance 


and Continuing 


and Continuing 


Positive/ 


Appropriations 


Appropriations 


(Negative) 


- $ 


34,721,230 $ 


(491,692) 




1,993,056 


119,266 




66,567 


66,567 




8,075 




_ 


4,269,602 


167,673 


_ 


133,448 


43,448 




1,641,936 


411 


_ 


93,905 


(1,095) 




517,819 


48,979 


_ 


671,019 


287,919 


- 


44,116,657 


241,476 


76,094 


1,788,343 


(161,405) 


1,000 


5,716,685 


(2,717) 


29,710 


21,271,091 


(7,472) 




913,669 


28,157 




1,087,060 


1 


- 


621,115 


138 




2,738,740 


1,758 




4,831,714 


(^905) 




312,095 


2,905 




524,783 


17,360 




2,300,892 


(70,964) 




2,246,809 


153,939 








(106,804) 


(236,339) 


200,271 




575,000 






81,208 


81,208 




(1,076,706) 






(420,498) 


81,208 


(106,804) 


(656,837) 


281,479 


2,835,035 


2,835,035 




2,728,231 $ 


2,178,198 $ 


281,479 



Town ofSwamyscott, Massachusetts Required Supplementary InformaHon 



STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS 



JUNE 30, 2007 



ASSETS 
Current assets; 

Cash and cash equivalents 3 

Restricted cash and cash equivalents 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 

Real estate and personal property taxes 

Tax and utility liens 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 

Water 

Sewer 

Departmental and other 

Intergovernmental 

Due from other funds 

Total current assets 

Noncurrent assets: 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 

Intergovernmental 

Capital assets not being depreciated 

Capital assets, net of accumulated depreciation 

Total noncurrent assets 

Total assets 

LIABILITIES 
Current liabilities: 

Warrants payable 

Accrued payroll 

Other liabilities 

Due to other funds 

Accrued interest 

Workers' compensation claims 

Compensated absences 

Short-term notes payable 

Long-term bonds and notes payable 

Total current liabilities 

Noncurrent liabilities: 

Workers' compensation claims 

Compensated absences 

Long-term bonds and notes ;»yable 

Total noncurrent liabilities 

Total liabilities 

NET ASSETS 

Invested in capital assets, net of related debt 

Restricted for; 

Permanent funds; 

Expendable 

Nonexpendable 

Other specific purposes 

Unrestricted 

Total net assets $ 



Primary Government 


Governmental 


Business- type 




Activities 


Activities 


Total 


3,977,213 


$ 3,290,165 $ 


7,267,378 


4,936,503 


628,071 


5,564,574 


1,019,599 




1,019,599 


249,499 


131,897 


381,396 


193,962 




193,962 




911,080 


911,080 




601,073 


601,073 


31,453 




31,453 


5,355,684 


59,274 


5,414,958 


1,042,321 




1,042,321 


16,806,234 


5,621,560 


22,427,794 


471,123 


692,393 


1,163,516 


57,123,439 


252,182 


57,375,621 


13,553,415 


18,907,474 


32,460,889 


71,147,977 


19,852,049 


91,000,026 


87,954,211 


25,473,609 


113,427,820 


498,736 


44,072 


542,808 


53,539 


3,869 


57,408 


483,666 




483,666 


l,04i321 




1,042,321 


279,555 


192,479 


472,034 


94,456 




94,456 


181,627 


3,117 


184,744 


7,986,000 




7,986,000 


3,041,331 


1,775,696 


4,817,027 


13,661,231 


2,019,233 


15,680,464 


850,101 




850,101 


1,634,646 


28,053 


1,66^699 


35,565,793 


10,917,880 


46,483,673 


38,050,540 


\ 10,945,933 


48,996,473 


51,711,771 


12,965,166 


64,676,937 


34,573,579 


7,845,818 


42,419,397 


57,203 




57,203 


466,832 




466,832 


752,061 




752,061 


392,765 


4,662,625 


5,055,390 


36,242,440 


$ 12,508,443 $ 


48,750,883 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



Basic Financial Statetnents 



68 



PROPRIETARY FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS 



JUNE 30, 2007 



Business-Type Activities - Enterprise Funds 



ASSETS Water 
Current assets: 

Cash and cash equivalents $ 1,624,843 

Restricted cash and cash equivalents 628,071 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amoiints: 

Water 911,080 

Sewer 

UHlity liens 81,373 

Intergovernmental - 

Total current assets 3,245,367 

Noncurrent assets: 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 

Intergoverrunental 

Capital assets not being depreciated 2,542 

Capital assets, net of accumulated depreciation 4,184,848 

Total noncurrent assets 4,187,390 

Total assets 7,432,757 

LIABILITIES 

Current liabilities: 

Warrants payable 3,244 

Accrued payroll 2,196 

Accrued interest 9,972 

Compensated absences 1,048 

Long-term bonds and notes payable 613,632 

Total current liabilities 630,092 

Noncurrent liabilities: 

Compensated absences 9,434 

Long-term bonds and notes payable 3,747,431 

Total noncurrent liabilities 3,756,865 

Total liabihties 4,386,957 

NET ASSETS 

Invested in capital assets, net of related debt 454,398 

Unrestricted 2,591,402 

Total net assets $ 3,045,800 



Sewer 



Total 



1,665,322 $ 



601,073 
50,524 
59,274 



2,376,193 



692,393 
249,640 
14,722,626 

15,664,659 

18,040,852 



40,828 
1,673 
182,507 
2,069 
1,162,064 

1,389,141 



18,619 
7,170,449 

7,189,068 

8,578,209 



7,391,420 
2,071,223 



3,290,165 
628,071 

911,080 
601,073 
131,897 
59,274 

5,621,560 



692,393 
252,182 
18,907,474 

19,852,049 

25,473,609 



44,072 
3,869 
192,479 
3,117 
1,775,696 

2,019,233 



28,053 
10,917,880 

10,945,933 

12,965,166 



7,845,818 
4,662,625 



9,462,643 $ 12,508,443 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



Basic Financial Statements 



69 



PROPRIETARY FUNDS 

STATEME^JT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2007 



Business-Type Activities - Enterprise Funds 





Water 


Sewer 


Total 


OPERATING REVENUES 


$ 2,388,426 $ 
361,998 
42,120 


1,325,966 $ 
197,408 
35,021 


3,714392 
559,406 
77,141 


TOTAL OPERATING REVENUES 


2,792,544 


1,558,395 


4,350,939 


OPERATING EXPENSES 

Cost of service and administration 


2,324,584 
162,235 


1,556,616 
504,674 


3,881,200 
666,909 


TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES 


2,486,819 


2,061,290 


4,548,109 


OPERATING INCOME (LOSS) 


305,725 


(502,895) 


(197,170) 


NONOPERATING REVENUES (EXPENSES) 

Intergovernmental 

Interest expense 


(56,575) 


329,539 
(454,700) 


329,539 
(511,275) 


TOTAL NONOPERATING REVENUES (EXPENSES), NET 


(56,575) 


(125,161) 


(181,736) 


INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE TRANSFERS 


249,150 


(628,056) 


(378,906) 


TRANSFERS 

Transfers in 

Transfers out 


(275,000) 


1,039,729 
(275,000) 


1,039,729 
(550,000) 


TOTAL TRANSFERS 


(275,000) 


764,729 


489,729 


CHANGE IN NET ASSETS 


(25,850) 


136,673 


110,823 


NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR (AS RESTATED) 


3,071,650 


9,325,970 


12,397,620 


NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR 


... $ 3,045,800 $ 


9,462,643 $ 


12,508,443 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



70 



Basic Financial Statements 



FIDUCIARY FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF FIDUCIARY NET ASSETS 



JUNE 30, 2007 


ASSETS 


Pension 
Trust Fund 
(As of 12/31/06) 


Private 
Purpose 
Trust Funds 


Agency 
Funds 


Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 


814,418 
30,417,050 
7,003 

100,144 


$ 322,244 $ 
- 


162,920 
- 




31,338,615 


322,244 


162,920 


LIABILITIES 

Warrants payable 


8,719 




25,275 
137,645 


Total liabilities 


8,719 




162,920 


NET ASSETS 

Held in trust for pension benefits and other purposes $ 


31,329,896 


$ 322,244 $ 





See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



71 



Basic Financial Statements 



FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FIDUCIARY NET ASSETS 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2007 



Pension Private 
Trust Fund Purpose 
(As of 12/31/06) Trust Funds 

ADDITIONS 

Contributions: 



In TN 1 /ii V 

Employee 

Private donations 


4: 


Z,DDy,lZU q) 

873,246 
- 


57,322 


Total contributions 




3,542,366 


57,322 


Net investment income: 

Net appreciation/ (depreciation) in fair value of investments 
Interest 




3,004,181 
345,994 


14,289 


Total investment income (loss) 




3,350,175 


14,289 


Less investment expense 




(246,199) 


- 


Net investment income (loss) 




3,103,976 


14,289 


Interpovernmpntal 




337 n7S 




Transfers from other systems 




51,439 




TOTAL ADDITIONS 




7,034,856 


71,611 


DEDUCTIONS 

Administration 

Retirement benefits and refunds 

Transfers to other systems 

Scholarships awarded 




204,196 
4,256,092 
180,395 


19,799 


TOTAL DEDUCTIONS 




4,640,683 


19,799 


CHANGE IN NET ASSETS 




2,394,173 


51,812 


NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 




28,935,723 


270,432 


NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR 


... $ 


31,329,896 $ 


322,244 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts . Basic Financial Statements 



72 



achusetts Department of Revenue Division of Local Services 

>t Bal. Commissioner Robert G. Nunes, Deputy Commissiorier & Director of Municipal Affairs 



February 11, 2008 




ro the Town Accountant: 
fown of Swampscott 

Based upon the unaudited balance sheet submitted by theTown, I hereby certify that the annount of 
available funds or "free cash" as of July 1 , 2007 for the Town of Swampscott is: 

General Fund $ 229,387 

Water Enterprise Fund $ 1 ,078,938 

Sewer Enterprise Fund $ 963,688 



This certification is in accordance with the provisions of the Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 69, Section 23, as amended. 

Please fon/vard copies to the Board of Selectmen/Town Manager, Treasurer, 
Board of Assessors. 



Sincerely, 

Anthony A. Rassias 
Deputy Director of Accounts 



^AR:ccg 



°osf Office Box 9569 Boston, f^A 02114-9569, Tel: 617-626-2300; Fax: 617-626-2330 

73 



Navjeet 6a/, Commissioner 



Massachusetts Department of Revenue 



Robert G. Nunes, Deputy Commissioner & Director of Municipal Affairs 



Division ofLocai Services 




February 12, 2008 



UPDATE 



To the Town Accountant: 
Town of Swampscott 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 59, Section 23, Massachusetts General Laws, approval is 
given to the Town of Swampscott through the Board of Selectmen, to consider the use of proceeds 
from the collection of SBA Reimbursement received October 17, 2007, in the amount of $1 ,037,737. 
These funds may be used in addition to available funds certified July 1, 2007. 

Additionally, please be advised that we are infonning all communities that we will be unable to 
approve a request for the use of adjusted free cash next year should its use in the current fiscal year 
result in a year-end free cash deficit. 



Sincerely, 




Anthony A. Rassias 
Deputy Director of Accounts 



AAR:ccg 



Post Office Box 9569 Boston. MA 02114-9569, Tel: 617-626-2300; Fax: 617-626-2330 

74 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Neil G. Sheehan, Chairman 

John V. Phelan, III, M.A.A., Member 

William Sullivan, III, Secretary 



Donna Champagne O'Keefe, Esq., Asst. Assr. 
Pamela R. Hogan, Clerk 
Brenda Corso, Clerk 



In accordance with Article 4 Section 2 of the by-laws of the Town of Swampscott, 
the Board of Assessors herewith submits its annual report to the citizens of the Town of 
Swampscott for the Fiscal Year 2007. 

In Fiscal 2007, real estate values continued to increase, not only in Swampscott, 
but also across the state. The Assessing Department conducted an interim year 
assessment analysis and adjusted real estate values based on market indications. 
Consequently, residential real estate assessments increased overall by 2.7% for Fiscal 
2007. Commercial assessments increased by 2.9%. 

Under the provisions of Proposition 2%, the Department of Revenue requires all 
real estate to reflect 100% of full and fair cash value every year. The Department of 
Revenue certifies compliance with the statute every three years. The Town of 
Swampscott will be conducting a three-year revaluation requiring recertification of 
values for Fiscal Year 2008. 

Additionally, under proposition 2%, the town is required to physically measure 
and inspect all real estate within the community every ten years. Toward this end, the 
Assessors Department will continue conducting permit reviews and cyclical inspections. 
Since the accuracy of data is directly related to assessing the value of real and personal 
property equitably, the cooperation of Swampscott residents is strongly encouraged. 
These efforts help to ensure consistent distribution of the tax burden. New 
assessments will be available for public review in November. 

The practice of interim year adjustments has allowed the Board to maintain fair 
and defensible values at the Appellate Tax Board. This has resulted in a consistently 
positive overlay reserve that is then released to the surplus account. The total amount 
released to the surplus account by the Board since 1997 is $2,165,000. 

On September 18, 2006, the Board of Selectmen voted unanimously to appoint 
Mr. William Sullivan, III to fill the vacancy filled by the passing of Board member Mrs. 
Vera C. Harrington. At the town wide election in April, Mr. Sullivan was elected to the 
Board of Assessors for a one-year term and Mr. Neil G. Sheehan was elected to the 
Board of Assessors for a three-year term. Subsequently, at the Board of Assessors' re- 
organizational meeting, Mr. Sullivan was voted Secretary to the Board; Mr. Neil G. 
Sheehan was voted Chairman to the Board. 

The senior abatement/exemption work-off program is now in its 8*^ year and 
continues to benefit both the Town and seniors through the voluntary work performed by 
27 senior citizens throughout the Town. The total amount of abatements/exemptions 
issued through the program for Fiscal 2007 was $16,476.00. 

In a joint meeting on December 4, 2006, the Board of Selectmen once again 
voted to maintain a split tax rate. The approved rates for Fiscal 2007 are $12.86 per 
thousand for residential property and $23.74 per thousand for commercial, industrial, 
and personal property. 



75 



statutory personal exemptions/tax deferrals, which are mandatory under Chapter 
59 MGL, totaled $107,609.94, and were given to 166 qualified homeowners. 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 

Number of Vehicles 1 3,679 
Excise Tax Commitment Total $2,000,449.00 

BOAT EXCISE 

Number of Vessels 1 62 

Excise Tax Commitment Total $7,794 

The Board of Assessors wishes to express its appreciation to Mr. Andrew Maylor, 
David Casteilarin, Russell Patten, and Denise Dembkoski for their cooperation and 
assistance throughout the year. 

The Board of Assessors herewith submits its figures used to determine the tax 
rate for Fiscal year 2007. 

Respectfully, 

Neil G.Sheehan, Chairman 
John V. Phelan, III, Member 
William Sullivan, III, Secretary 



76 



THE COMMONWliALm Ut MAbbACHUfcihl lb 

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 
FISCAL 2007 TAX LEVY LIMITATION FOR 

SCOTT 

FOR BUDGET PLANNING PURPOSES 



TO CALCULATE THE FY2006 LEVY 
I. LIMIT 



A. FY2005 Levy Limit 

A1 ADD Amended FY2005 Growth 

B. ADD ( lA + IA1 ) X 2.5% 

C. ADD FY2006 New Growth 

D. ADD FY2006 Override 

E. FY2006 Subtotal 

F. FY2006 Levy Ceiling 



27,864,867 







696,622 



227,518 



2,231,000 



31,020,007 

$ 

I. I 31,020,007 
63,476,515 FY2006 Levy Limit 



TO CALCULATE THE FY2007 LEVY 
IL LIMIT 

A. FY2006 Levy Limit from L 
A1 ADD Amended FY2006 Growth 

B. ADD ( IIA + IIA1 ) X 2.5% 
0. ADD FY2007 New Growth 

D. ADD FY2007 Override 

E. FY2007 Subtotal 

F. FY2007 Levy Ceiling 



in. TO CALCULATE THE FY2007 
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE LEVY 



31,020,007 







775,500 



337,604 



32,133,111 



65,236,473 



n. 



$ 

32,133,111 



FY2007 Levy Limit 



A. FY2007 Levy Limit from IL 32,133,111 



77 



B. FY2007 Debt Exclusion(s) 

C. FY2007 Capital Expenditure 
Exclusion(s) 

D. FY2007 Other Adjustment 

E. FY2007 Water / Sewer 



3,285,058 



F. FY2007 Maximum Allowable Levy 



$ 

35,418,169 



78 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



The Swampscott Zoning Board of Appeals had an expedient and 
successful fiscal year 2007 (July 2006- June 2007). Early on in the year, 
The Board of Selectmen appointed Attorney Marc Komitsky as an associate 
member of the ZBA, to fill a vacancy caused by Ned Breeds resignation. At 
the July 2007 ZBA public hearing, the Board elected Harry I. Pass, Esq. as 
Chairman, Damon Seligson, Esq. as Vice-Chairman, and Daniel Hause as 
Clerk. 

This year presented the ZBA with many difficult decisions, involving 
many complex legal and factual issues. The ZBA met 12 times and 
conducted public hearings on approximately 89 petitions, of which 
approximately only 4 petitions were denied by the ZBA. Although each of 
the petitions and the ZBA's decisions were not without some controversy, 
the ZBA worked diligently to accurately, consistently and fairly interpret 
and implement the Swampscott Zoning By-Laws. 

The ZBA would like to express its gratitude to Linda Paster for her 
tireless efforts on behalf of the ZBA for many years, and especially for all of 
her guidance and assistance this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Chairman 



ANNUAL REPORT 
JULY 2006 - JUNE 2007 



JULY 2006 

Heard 5 Petitions Approved 4 Cont'd 1 

2 Business 
2 Real Estate Growth 



AUGUST 2006 

Heard 4 Petitions Approved 4 

2 Business 
2 Real Estate Growth 



SEPTEMBER 2006 

Heard 10 Petitions Approved 6 Cont'd 4 

4 Business 
2 Real Estate Grov^h 



OCTOBER 2006 

Heard 7 Petitions 



Approved 7 

2 Business 

5 Real Estate Growth 



NOVEMBER 2006 

Heard 9 Petitions Approved 5 W/D 1 Denied 1 Cont'd 2 

2 Business 

3 Real Estate Growth 



DECEMBER 2006 

Heard 8 Petitions Approved 4 Cont'd 4 

2 Business 
2 Real Estate Growth 



80 



JANUARY 2007 

Heard 8 Petitions Approved 4 Cont'd 4 

2 Business 
2 Real Estate Growth 

FEBRUARY 2007 

Heard 7 Petitions Approved 3 Cont'd 4 

1 Business 

2 Real Estate Growth 

MARCH 2007 

Heard 9 Petitions Approved 8 Denied 1 

4 Business 
4 Real Estate Growth 

APRIL 2007 

Heard 8 Petitions Approved 6 Cont'd 2 

2 Business 
4 Real Estate Growth 

MAY 2007 

Heard 6 Petitions Approved 4 Denied 1 Cont'd 1 

2 Business 
2 Real Estate Growth 

JUNE 2007 

Heard 8 Petitions Approved 5 W/D 1 Cont'd 2 

2 Business 

3 Real Estate Growth 

TOTALS 

Heard 89 Petitions Approved 61 W/D 2 Denied 4 Cont'd 22 



81 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS: JOSEPH LATRONICA 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: LIANNE BELKAS 

LOCAL BUILDING INSPECTOR: STEVE ROBBINS 

PLUMBING/GAS INSPECTOR: PETER MCCARRISTON 

ALTERNATE PLUMBING/GAS INSPECTOR: MICHAEL WALDMAN 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR: JIM SAMMS 

ALTERNATE ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR: JOHN BARNES 



The Building Department interprets and enforces the Massachusetts State Building Code, 
Architectural Access Code, Plumbing and Gas Code, Massachusetts Electrical Code and the 
Town of Swampscott Zoning By-Laws in order to insure the public safety. 

The Department also reviews applications and issues permits, conducts field inspections 
and responds to the request for information and compliance, maintains property records, assists 
residents, contractors and others, and works with the town departments to help assure 
consistency, accuracy and access to information. 

Fiscal Year 2007 saw yet another increase in number of permits issued as well as 
inspections performed. The department continues to upgrade general information hand-outs, as 
well as our website, to continually improve our ability to serve the community. 
Local inspector, Steve Robbins has left the department and we wish to thank him for his service. 

The following information contains the Building Department activity for the fiscal year 
2007 (July 1, 2006-June 30, 2007). Total number of permits issued, fees collected and estimated 
construction costs are as follows: 



Permits & Fees: Total # of Permits: Total $ of Fees: Total Construction Cost 



Building 


524 


$189,058.00 


$22,748,586.00 


Plumbing 


403 


$13,651.00 




Gas 


277 


$8,498.00 




Wiring 


377 


$21,200.00 




Certificate of Insp. 


31 


$1,343.00 




Certificate of Occ. 


39 






TOTAL: 


1651 


$233,750.00 


$22,748,586.00 



Respectfully, 



Joseph P. Latronica 
Inspector of Buildings 



82 



2007 ANNUAL REPORT OF TOWN COUNSEL 



Town Counsel responded to a number of requests for opinions from Town officials on a wide 
variety of issues and represented the Town in several pending court actions. We advised the Board of 
Selectmen with respect to numerous zoning appeals, town meeting procedure, amendments to bylaws, 
election issues, real estate and title issues, labor matters, procurement, construction and contract issues, 
comprehensive permit issues, and various other general municipal matters. 

As always, we strive to provide speedy, accurate and cost effective responses to requests for 
advisory opinions. Town Counsel has represented the Town and its officers in judicial proceedings before 
the District Court, Superior Court and Land Court, and has represented the Town in administrative 
hearings before the Civil Service Commission and Housing Appeals Committee. We have worked hard to 
provide effective representation of the Town in all of the Town's pending litigation, and we continue to 
successfully represent the Town in various litigation matters. 

The office of Town Counsel has continued to work with the Town to reduce municipal legal costs, 
by researching many issues of municipal law and mailing Memoranda addressing those issues at no 
charge to the Town. For example, in the last twelve months, we have advised the Town with regard to 
the new fire sprinkler law and liquor license renewal applications, use of Community Preservation Act 
Funds, health insurance coverage issues and the Health Care Reform Law, the Massachusetts 
Independent Contractor Law, competitive cable television licenses, solid waste user fees, the applicability 
of the Open Meeting and Public Records Laws to employee search/screening committees, and many 
other timely municipal topics. 

We have attended meetings of various Town Boards at the Town's request, and with permission 
of the Board of Selectmen or Town Administrator, to provide advice on pending litigation and for the 
purposes of risk management 

Town Counsel's objective continues to be to provide high quality legal services to the Town In a 
responsive and timely manner at a reasonable cost. 

We extend our appreciation to the Board of Selectmen and Town Administrator for their 
confidence in retaining this firm, and we appreciate the assistance and cooperation we have received on 
all matters from the Board of Selectmen, Town Administrator and other Town Boards and personnel. We 
look forward to working with members of the Swampscott town government in the future. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Leonard Kopelman, for the firm 
of Kopelman and Paige, P.C., 
Town Counsel 

336560/SWAMy8888 



83 



SWAMPSCOTT SENIOR CENTER ANNUAL REPORT 2006-2007 



MISSION STATEMENT 

• To Serve all seniors with dignity and positive regard 

• To identify and respond to the needs of elders and to advocate on their behalf 

• To promote an awareness in the community of issues regarding seniors 
BOARD MEMBERS Staff Members 

Mary Abramson, Chairperson Marilyn Hurwitz, Executive Director 

Estelle Epstein, Social Programs Rod Pickard Assistant Director 

Mary Cobbett, Secretary Warren Hopkins, Outreach Worker 

Deborah Giovanucci, Medical Advisor Joanne Gallo, Office Assistant 

Bill Hyde Community Liaison Howard Conley, Van Driver 

Felice Litman, Arts; SHINE Robert Grimes, Van Driver 

Marion Stone, Special Events Lois Donovan, Activities Coordinator 

Arlene Rosen, Treasurer; Special Projects Donald Wescott. Activities Coordinator 
Claire Dembowski, Friends of the Senior Center Liaison, SpecialPrograms 

The Swampscott Council on Aging Board is a policy making board. At the present time we have 
a full board serving on special committees. 

HIGHLIGHTS of 2006-2007 

The Swampscott Senior Center had a difficult year in regards to staffing, in November, an 
interim director was put in place after several months with leadership absent due to health related 
issues. There was a wonderful holiday party planned for over one hundred seniors. The staff 
then met to discuss both plans for the winter schedule and possible changes in job 
responsibilities. Monthly, members of the staff met with the building committee and school 
representatives to plan our move to the new facility. Although the physical space at 
Burrill St. limited our accessibility, the following were added to our monthly calendar. 
We celebrated birthdays one Friday per month. There were mystery lunch trips, musical 
performances, cross generational projects and day trips, hi addition, the staff brought 
informational presentations to the seniors on health issues, financial planning, safety 
concerns and fitness. There was an increase in participation with many plans for 
improvement as the center prepares to move. 
VOLUNTEER APPRECIATION 

We are very fortunate to have talented and dedicated volunteers. This year, Sheryl Gresek 
from Congressman Tierney's office, presented awards to the following volunteers for their 
outstanding efforts over the past year: All board members were honored. Also the following 
dedicated people who give their time each week were acknowledged: Clara Grimes, Louise 
Gallo, Roz Goldman, Mary Rosetti, Al Snyder, Ruth Roche, Kay Howes, Donna Butts, Millie 
Mangini, Mary Katsoulis, Mary Lydon, Mary Curtis, Eleanor O'Neil, Kay Dalton, Mark Cohen, 
Charlie Panias, Chuck Marcou, Joe Balsama, Myron Stone, Howie Vatcher, Sid Epstein, Dick 
Baldacci, Jerry Feldman, John Garden, and Sy Novak, Leslie Sweeney, and Marilyn Keay. We 
so appreciate all that they do. 
TRANSPORTATION 

Transportation continues to be a critical issue for seniors. Due to increased gasoline prices 
we have had to make a small adjustment in van fares. The Council continues to offer 
transportation to and from the lunch program Monday Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday. Food 
shopping and banking take place Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday. Local trips to department 
stores take place on Friday. Reservations are made by calling the Senior Center on the day the 
ride is needed. Medical transportation can be arranged through GLSS, The Ride and private 
vendors. 



84 



OUTREACH 

One of the primary functions of any senior center is tlieir outreach effort. Currently a part time 
professional that meets or visits with elders in our community staffs Swampscott's outreach 
program. This service requires strict attention on the part of our staff when it comes to listening to 
and understanding people's problems. In this way, we can refer them to the proper agency and 
minimize the amounts of forms and telephone calls for those involved. Medical and legal 
concerns along with health care, housing, transportation, finance, and insurance are some of the 
issues that are addressed. 
INFORMATION AND REFERAL 

The information and referral service provides a very essential function for the senior 
community. Although we try to assist elders and their families directly when possible, many times 
we act as the intermediary, referring people to various agencies. Issues regarding transportation, 
home health care, meals on wheels, nursing homes and adult day care are just some of the many 
areas in which Information and assistance are available. 
TRIAD 

We have formed a TRIAD Council here in Swampscott. TRIAD is a joint effort of the local 
senior center, the Essex County Sheriffs Department, local law enforcement and protective 
services. We have had two organizational meetings with members of the Sheriffs Department, 
Swampscott Police, and Fire Departments, GLSS, Senior Center Staff and board members. 
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP 

A caregiver support group facilitated by Debby Segil, a social worker from GLSS meets twice 
a month at the Senior Center. This group functions as a support activity for those caring for 
elderly family members or friends who are ill. 
S.H.I.N.E. 

S.H.I.N.E. (serving the health insurance needs of elders) counselors Felice Litman and 
Warren Hopkins have completed extensive training and attend meetings to constantly update 
their information. They meet with clients every Thursday at 1 1 :00am, and by appointment. 
MEN'S CLUB SPEAKER SERIES 

Over the past year the Swampscott Senior Men's Club has hosted a number of very 
interesting speakers at each of their monthly meetings. They include: see Warren! 
NUTRITION 

Meals are served five days a week from 1 1 :45 until 1 2:30. No reservations are required for 
lunch. Last year over 7000 meals were served here at the center. Greater Lynn Senior Services 
delivers approximately 50 meals daily to homebound residents. The interfaith food pantry collects 
non-perishable foods from local churches and temples and distributes groceries at the Senior 
Center and Senior Housing Units. 
PROGRAMS. CLASSES, and TRIPS 

Several classes, programs and trips are offered to seniors. Information appears in our 
monthly newsletter. The Compass, The Swampscott Reporter, Lynn Item, and Salem News. New 
Classes established this year were tap dancing, knitting, and a women's discussion group. 
SPECIAL PROJECT 

The Swampscott Council on Aging has sponsored two writing groups since 1998. They meet 
weekly in the back room of Panera Bread, on Paradise Rd. Deahn Berriini Leblang and Babo 
Kamel are the instructors. This year a very special edition of original works was printed. 
Counterpoint is a collection of writing produced by these two groups. This book is for sale at the 
senior center at the price of $5.00. 
HEALTH PROGRAMS 

Blood pressure clinics are offered twice weekly. In addition, the flu clinic is always run at the 
center. 

NEWSLETTER 

The Compass is published monthly and contains the monthly menu, activities for the coming 
month, the director's column, and original poems from the writing group and the latest information 
of interest to seniors. 



85 



FRIENDS OF THE COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Friends of the Swampscott Council on Aging was formed in February of 1995 and 
continues to lend assistance to the Center. 
THANKYOU 

A very special thank you to all who volunteered at the Senior Center: your efforts are 
appreciated. You make a difference and make our center a warmer and kinder facility. 



86 



Earth Removal Advisory Committee (ERAC) 

In 1993, former owner of the quarry Bardon Trimount, clear-cut a three-acre parcel of 
trees just north of Overhill road. Many neighbors felt increases in dust and noise. The 
Selectmen appointed a group and an Earth Removal by-law was voted in by town 
meeting in 1 994. 

One of the first tasks of the newly formed "ERAC" was to place remaining undisturbed 
trees and property into a no-cut, no-disturb GREENBELT area for the protection of the 
neighbors. In addition, Bardon Trimount was forced to replant and replicate the three- 
acre site that was cut down without permits. 

The ERAC feels that the negative effects of dust and noise the neighbors experienced and 
felt when the three acre parcel was clear-cut, is more than enough evidence to insist that 
the GREENBELT Buffer remain in place. The GREENBELT area is an important area 
to the residents and now the new Swampscott High School. The ERAC is working to 
ensure this area remain a solid buffer and is working at replanting some areas that have 
been encroached upon over the past few years. 

The ERAC continues to insist upon quarry modernization at the Aggregate Industry 
Operation on Dan vers Road. 

Over the past year, the ERAC has monitored the testing of water at Fosters Dam, and 
worked on new noise studies that are comparing the new crushing plants to the old 
outdated equipment that has been replaced. ERAC continues to build a date file in 
regards to the health and environmental issues surrounding the quarry operation. 

The ERAC monitors the daily operation of the quarry in regards to all activities in the 
quarry. The ERAC generally handles all complaints and inquiries at the Aggregate 
property. 

This past year truck restrictions by Aggregate Industries were put in place in regards to 
Essex street truck traffic. 

The ERAC has been working and pushing AI to update and modernize the plant and 
equipment at the quarry since inception of the by-law in 1994. Using a strong, but fair 
guiding hand over the past few years, we can report that the quarry operation has been 
perhaps 99% modernized . The ERAC has negotiated fairly, but firmly. Many meetings 
have been confrontational with neither side wanting to back down. This seems to be a 
common occurrence in other local communities that have quarries located in them. 



87 



Recognizing the size of the operation and understanding the complexity of replacing and 
modernizing a plant of such physical spanning size, the ERAC has worked with AI in 
directing, and sometimes selecting what was going to be done and in what order. For 
instance; the old secondary crusher was located right in the driveway of the old entrance. 
Crushing, screening, and loading of trucks were taking place just 200 feet from the 
entrance of the facility. Despite witnessing some valiant efforts by AI, both physically 
and financially to rein in the dust problem at this major section of plant, AI was unable 
bring dust containment down to an acceptable level. In order for the ERAC to 
recommend renewal of their permit AI had to relocate and upgrade this operation to an 
area of the quarry which was further back from the road, and into the upper part of the 
"hole." This plant has historically operated from the hours of 6:00 AM to 10:00 PM. 
The ERAC; in no uncertain terms has continuously informed AI that the plant and 
equipment should be sized properly to meet all their production needs within a 10-12 
hour work day. The ERAC has continuously clearly informed AI that after 2004, rock 
crushing past 5:00 or 6:00 PM in the evening was not realistic: and that the town and 
residents will not want to hear this equipment at that time of the evening and to be 
absolutely sure that their equipment and plant are sized to get the job done during typical 
construction hours. The ERAC continues to investigate some outstanding engineering 
questions in regards to the secondary plant but is very encouraged by the plants 
operation. The noise level produce by this plant is the measurement in which the ERAC 
shall measure against the new Primary Plant in 2004. 

** The ERAC has stated that should AI be able to conduct operations that would be 
oblivious to the neighbors and residents of Swampscott and Salem, that we would not 
mind a 24 hour operation. "If we can't hear you, we will not know you're there." 

Another key decision by the ERAC was the relocation of the front entrance. In an effort 
to cut down on dust blowing off trucks and to try and achieve a 50/50 split with truck 
traffic traveling through Salem & Swampscott, the ERAC "suggested" that the entrance 
be relocated. The ERAC believed that by moving the entrance fiirther down the road, a 
majority of dust would blow off the trucks before reaching the populated areas of 
Swampscott and Salem. Although the traffic goal of 50/50 has not been realized, and 
dust blowing off trucks has been substantially reduced, dust still blowing off trucks 
remains a problem. When the push was made to relocate the entrance, the truck wash 
station that was to be installed during the summer of 2001 was delayed in part to properly 
place the equipment within the area of the new entrance; an entrance that involved a 
substantial effort to build. A truck wash station is not a mobile piece of equipment. It 
made no sense to install this equipment at the old entrance when a new exit was being 
constructed. The ERAC has been working of some type of truck wash since 1998, but 
has prioritized our improvement requests as we see fit. 



88 



And finally the last piece of the puzzle: The primary crusher moves to the bottom 
by 2004. 



The ERAC has reached the end of a ten year effort to modernize the operation of the 
quarry. The primary crusher moving to the bottom of the hole is the final piece of the 
puzzle. But first some background on the current primary crusher: The primary crusher 
is the machine that most of the town is hearing. It is a machine that has two gigantic 
adjustable "jaws." It is also the first piece of equipment that the blasted rock is 
introduced to. Ledge rock is blasted fi*om the face of the quarry, and hauled via huge 
trucks to the "hopper" of the primary plant. The trucks dump directly into the hopper and 
the rock falls into the "jaw" of the crusher. The jaw is set to a dimension to reduce the 
large raw blasted boulders into smaller rocks that are then screened and conveyed onto 
the secondary crushing plant. The primarv plant is onlv one crusher . The secondary 
plant has many smaller crushers and screens that reduce and process the finished rock 
product. An interesting observation of the "jaw" crusher is that is makes less noise and 
runs faster if the raw material being dumped in the hopper is not all large stones. 
Interesting because the blasting technique has a lot to do with the size of the raw material 
that is dumped into the hopper. A lesser and maybe weaker "blast" seems to produce 
much larger raw material. This larger raw material dumped into the hopper of the "jaw" 
make the "jaw" work that much harder, and is that much louder. Improved blasting 
techniques, as well as a new blasting contractor seem to have reduced the amount or 
larger rocks that go through the crusher as well as the blasting readings and complaints 
have diminished substantially over the past 6 years. 

The ERAC has worked to place the primary crusher in bottom of the hole for several 
reasons: 

1. Noise. The hope is that noise will be reduced to the level of the secondary 
crushing plant. This is the standard that we have talked about for the past several years. 
In 1997, before the secondary plant was replaced, the ERAC, in conjunction with former 
superintendent Marty McKenney, and Bardon Trimount noise engineer Mike Nutting, 
conducted several tests at various locations. We stood at the comer of Nichols and 
Martin road, the top of Overhill road, and at the intersection of Eastman and Minerva. 
With no measuring equipment set up, we conducted the following simple test: first we 
listened as the entire plant operated at fiill capacity. Marty then radioed the plant and had 
the secondary plant shut down. We noticed no change in the amount of noise. Next 
Marty radioed to run the secondary plant again, and this time shut down the primary 
plant, the "jaw." There was virtually no noise with the secondary plant running and 
the primarv plant off. We performed this test at the other locations and heard the same 
results. This is to be the test for the new primary plant . In order to maintain the 
existing historical hours of operation, Bardon Trimount would have to reach the noise 
level of that when the secondary crusher is running by itsel f. No measure of decibel's; a 
simple test of the naked ear . It is Dan Dandreo's contention that the new plant will not 
be able to be achieved these noise levels even with the new primary crushing plant in 
place, which is why new capacity is so important. 



89 



2. Capacity. The ERAC, concerned that noise reduction goals cannot be met, has 
continuously insisted that the new primary crusher is sized properly to ensure needed and 
contract production can be met within a 10-12 hour workday. ." This plant has 
historically operated from the hours of 7:00 AM to 9:00 PM. The ERAC; in no uncertain 
terms has continuously informed AI that the plant and equipment should be sized 
properly to meet all their production needs within a 10-12 hour work day. The ERAC 
has clearly informed AI that after 2004, rock crushing past 5:00 or 6:00 PM in the 
evening was not realistic; and that the town and residents will not want to hear this 
equipment at that time of the evening and to be absolutely sure that their equipment and 
plant are sized to get the job done during typical construction hours. 

3. Dust. The ERAC is optimistic that by placing the Primary Crusher deeper into 
the hole will reduce the dust from escaping the rim of the quarry because the dust will 
have to travel much further to leave the property. In addition, there appears to be several 
"foaming" products that are available that may be able to be adapted to the plant 
equipment to further reduce dust before it becomes airborne. 

Closing thought. Moving the primary crusher to the bottom of the hole by no means 
guarantees that all will be well at the end of 2004. By the end of 2004-2005, It appears 
that the quarry operation will be fully modernized. The Town of Swampscott, the City of 
Salem, and the quarry may be at a crossroad. Should the quarry, after ten years of intense 
modernization, not be able to reduce noise, dust and truck traffic to level's which allow it 
to co-exist with its neighbors, and not be able to reach and follow requirements out lined 
under the bylaws of the Town of Swampscott, the realization that a quarry of such 
magnitude just cannot fit in such a tight populated area may have to be made. Perhaps a 
new use of the land along the lines of the now closed Rowe quarry in Revere, or the Innis 
quarry in Danvers may indeed be the most appropriate use of the property. 



90 



Swampscott Emergency Management 

Bruce Gordon, Director 

The role of Swampscott Emergency Management is to provide a link to 
resources when the Town is no longer able to mitigate a situation. Emergency 
Management is also mandated to develop and maintain a Comprehensive Emergency 
Management Plan that is an all hazard plan, identifying hazards and potential 
emergencies that could occur in the Town and resources available to assist in the 
mitigation of the event. Swampscott Emergency Management is committed to these 
responsibilities and continues to work at keeping the Town plans current and up to date. 
Swampscott Emergency Management is committed to insuring the safety of the Town 
and the well being of the interests are at all times being protected and when an event 
occurs a complete and timely response is initiated to continue this level of protection. 

The Federal Government has mandated that all of government at the federal, 
state and local levels undergo training and use of the National Incident Management 
Systems also known as NIMS. This training has begun in Swampscott and we will 
continue to strive to be compliant with their requirements. More and more demands are 
being placed on Emergency Management to attend training and education seminars as 
well as State and Federal conferences and briefings. We also have more demands for 
information from all layers of Government for questionnaires, surveys, studies and 
projects. We are currently involved in interoperability, notification systems, pre-hazard 
mitigation projects. We continue to pursue all grant opportunities. 

Through FEMA and MEMA the Town was able to receive approximately 
$87,000.00 in funds as reimbursement for the May 2006 flooding. We have obtained a 
component of a GIS system called Pictometry which is going to be enhanced with the 
cooperation of the Assessors to proved Public Safety Officials another tool to assist 
them. Through another grant we were able to obtain a mobile message board that has 
been used for a variety of events and occasions. 

FY2008 Goals 

• To replenish First Responder Food and medical supplies 

• To begin to prepare the new High School as an Emergency Operations Center 

• To further enhance GIS for the Town 

• To strengthen the communications systems and enhance interoperability 

• Continue to identify resources that can be used by the Town 

• Incorporate the Board of Heath mass inoculation and the Housing Authority 
emergency plans into the Swampscott CEMP 



91 



While the chances of a domestic attacl< on Swampscott are extremely remote, the 
consequences of indirect results are high. We still are very vulnerable to acts of mature 
i.e. hurricanes, flooding and other crippling events. At these times unified command and 
interoperability can best be served by a properly equipped and operational Emergency 
Operations Center. I feel this should be the first priority of the Town in preparation for 
emergencies. 

This is my last year as emergency management director as I will be retiring in July, 
2007 after 40 years of public service including 36 years with the Swampscott Fire 
department. It has been a labor of love and I will miss the day to day challenges that 
come with emergency services. Emergency services, whether it be police, fire or 
emergency management can only work through teamwork and partnerships. 
Swampscott has a first class team. Through 100% dedication to the team and the Town, 
police, fire, DPW, public health and local government has improved the quality of life in 
Swampscott and made it a better and safer place. 

I would like to express my deepest appreciation and heartfelt thanks to all the 
departments in Town for their full commitment and assistance in Emergency 
Management. Without this my job would have been impossible. 



92 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Swampscott Fire Department is to provide optimum protection from fire loss, and 
to provide prompt and professional response to all medical emergencies. Although our primary objective is 
always to prevent loss of life and property through a proactive approach to fire prevention, when fire does 
occur, to contain and extinguish it with minimum loss. 

The Fire Department is made up of three divisions. The first division is the Administrative 
division, which is the Fire Chief, Training and Operations Officer (TOPS), and the Fire Investigation Unit 
(FIU). The Tops Officer is in charge of training, operations, and planning. He also keeps records of all the 
training that is done by the fire personnel, as well as records of all the equipment that is used by the 
department. This position is vital, because it keeps continuity between the four shifts that are working and 
coordinates with numerous professionals needed to keep the training current and up to date. The FIU unit is 
made up of two lieutenants and two fire fighters, who are normally assigned to the suppression duty but 
have been trained in fire investigation and do so in addition to their other duties. 

The second division is the Fire Prevention division, which is mn by Captain Breen. This division has 
been extremely busy, working with the completion of the new high school building on Essex Street, and 
enforcing the new sprinkler laws that have come down from the State Fire Marshals office. This office is 
also in charge of all the fire related permits that are needed to do business in town. 

The third division is the fu-e Suppression/EMS division and this is made up of four sub-divisions or 
shifts. Three shifts are made up of eight-man groups and one shift of nine men. The nine man shift allows 
the Department to run two engines and one ladder company, while the eight men groups only allow one 
engine and one ladder company per shift. Each group works a 24-hour shift giving, the people of 
Swampscott 24/7 emergency medical and fire protection. 

During the fiscal year July 1, 2006 to June 30, 2007 the fire department answered one thousand eight 
hundred five emergency calls, of which 26 involved fires in buildings. The Department also responded to 
numerous non-emergency service calls during the year. These calls dealt with fire inspections, school fire 
drills, box plug outs and any other non-emergency calls that the Fire Department might be required to 
respond to during the year. 
PERSONNEL 

During the past year, the Fire Department had only one member, John Chassion, retire after 32 years of 
service. In his place the Town hired Thomas Chadwell from the Fire Department Reserve list. This reserve 
list allows the Town to hire, without delay, a permanent or provisional firefighter for a position that may 
come available in the coming months, due to injiuy or retirement. The new appointee to the reserve list was 
Patrick Gallo. He has successfiilly completed the hiring process and was appointed to the reserve list in 
November 2006. 

Firefighter Chadwell was assigned to the 1 2 week firefighter recruit training class at the Massachusetts 
Fire Academy, in April and graduated in the top of his class in June. But due to the money problems 
confronting the Town in 2008, Chadwell was given a layoff notice before the start of the new budget in 
July. This now leaves the Town with three unfilled vacancies in the Fire Department. 
TRAINING, OPERATIONS, PLANNING AND SAFETY (TOPS) 

The Swampscott Fire Department has continued to provide its members with daily training. There has 
been a number of co-training courses that have been taught with the surrounding Fire Departments. This 
winter the Swampscott and Lyim Fire Departments trained in pond ice rescue, using Lynn's state of the art 
water rescue equipment. The training course was then relocated to the ocean at Lynn's Red rock area and 
again used the ice rescue equipment to simulate rescuing people off the ocean rocks. 

Marblehead and Swampscott Fire Departments, as well as some Salem Firefighters trained at the 
General Glover property in propane emergences taught by the Holden Propane Company. This course was 
very beneficial to all the Departments due to the number of propane trucks that are constantly in the area. 

Each year the Fire Department trains in medical emergency. Half of the Department will be recertified 
by the state as EMT's. This is a two-year process that requires each EMT to complete courses and 
accumulate 28 CEUs (Continuing Education Units) credits plus a 24-hour refresher course and 
examination to comply with State regulations. The other half of the Department will train this year and get 
their recertification next year. This will include CPR and defib fraining as well. The Department also 
completed mandatory Hazardous material, as well as NIMS 200 training. NIMS' training is National 
Incident Management training. This training allows the fire department to work with Federal, State and 
local agencies in times of national disasters or any type of large scale emergencies that require multiple 



93 



agency coordination. In service training on SOPs (Standard Operating Procedures) are constantly held 
during the regular shifts on a variety of subjects, including but not limited to, the apparatus operation and 
specialty equipment techniques. There is also training in the use of the Fire Department's rescue boat, as 
well as firefighting tactics and strategies. 

From a planning, operation, and safety standpoint, the Department continues to make safety for our 
firefighters and citizens our number one priority. Standard Operating Procedures are our guidelines for 
safety when using tools or operating at emergency incidents. These procedures are being revued for ways to 
improve on safety and efficiency throughout the year. These guidelines are also used to help maintain the 
consistency with the shifts in the daily operations of the Department. 

The Department S.A.F.E. Program (Student Awareness of Fire Education) is still run by Lt. Zimbaldi 
and Lt. Scranton. These program coordinators and mstructors can be found in our Middle School, educating 
the young students in valuable information on fire safety. This program is State-run, and is totally ftinded 
fi-om grant money that the instructors have applied for each year. 
FIRE PREVENTION 

The Fire Department's Fire Prevention Office, under the direction of Capt. Breen, inspects all 
commercial establishments and residences of three or more families annually. In addition to this, all 
mandatory inspections and fire drills are conducted in accordance with Massachusetts State Law. 

The Fire Prevention office is working diligently to impute all the needed fire prevention materials and 
permits into computer form. This process has been ongoing for a year and is very close to completion. 
There are over thirty different types of permits, ranging from cooking fires on the beach to under ground 
storage tanks. . Over 70% of these permits need follow-up inspections to be sure that the applicant has 
complied completely with the laws. These inspections as well as the mandatory building and school 
inspections, are done as non-emergency incidents, by the on shift crews. And they number in the thousands 
each year. 

This year the Fire Prevention Office was extremely busy, working with the new High School 
construction companies, on State Fire Regulations as well as the final inspection that is needed for the 
school to be opened in September. 
APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 

The Town has three fire apparatus in their fleet; there are two fire engines and one tower ladder. The 
tower ladder was bought in 2004 and is in good shape, but the two engines have seen some hard service. 
The older of the two engines is a 1988 E-One Hush that has out-lived its service life and needs to be 
replaced. The other engine is a 1997 E-One Cyclone. This engine is in need of a transmission, and 
hopefully it will be rebuilt once the new budget begins in July. With the Town running only one engine 
most of the time the Department is finding that the 97 is breaking done more fi-equently than expected. 

The Chiefs car is a 2002 and is scheduled to be replaced through capital improvements in 2008. The 
Department will trade in a 1 999 Ford Expedition. This car was a former police vehicle, and it was given to 
the Fire Department by the Town Hall when the FIU (Fire Investigation Vehicle) Ford Explore was 
destroyed in an accident last year. 
BUILDINGS 

The two buildings maintained by the Fire Department, Headquarters on Burrill Street and Phillips 
Beach Avenue continue to show their age. The outside of the Burrill Street Stations has been up-graded last 
year and should hold up well in the coming years, but the inside could use some reconditioning, floor tiles, 
paint and possible a new intercom system. As for the Phillips Beach Station, this building is in need of 
major repairs, windows, outside and inside painting, also a generator rebuild in the basement. Capital 
improvement committee has slated some upgrades in the Burrills Street station for the coming year that will 
be helpfiil. These include upgrading the garage door openers, the fire alarm system, and a security system 
for the building and grounds. 
CONCLUSION 

The current fiscal climate is taking its toll on the fire service. The Town now has three unfilled 
vacancies, which causes the Fire Department to run with only one engine and one ladder company per shift, 
three quarters of the time. Unfortunately for smaller communities like Swampscott, we do not have the 
large amount of public safety resources to be able to cut staff in difficult times and still be able to provide 
the same services. 

The Fire Department has appreciated the Town's support over the last year, and vows to continue its 
dedication in providing the best possible service in the year to come. 



94 



Harbor Advisory Committee 



William F. Hennessey-Chairman 



Lawrence P. Bithell 
Michael Gambale 
Mark Mahoney-Clerk 



Paul DeBole 
Paul Garcelon 
Peter McCarriston 



The Harbor Advisory Committee met on two occasions during the year 2007 to discuss 
matters of interest and importance with regard to the Swampscott waterfront. 

During the course of the year, the Town Administrator directed the harbormaster to investigate 
mooring fees currently charged by other North Shore communities. The harbormaster, then 
sought assistance and advice from the Harbor Advisory Committee in terms of gathering 
information from other communities. Information gathered consisted of mooring fees charged as 
had been requested by the Town Administrator; however. The Harbor Advisory Committee felt 
that information gathering should not only compare fees but also compare services offered by 
other communities. This information was gathered from eleven coastal cities and towns on the 
North Shore and was used as basis for recommendations made to the Town Administrator and to 
the Board of Selectmen. 

A comprehensive report was prepared and presented to the Town Administrator and to the 
Board of Selectmen resulting in the Board's adopting the H.A.C. recommendation that the 
mooring fee for Swampscott residents be reduced from $4.00 per linear foot to $3.50 per linear 
foot. In addition and upon a H.A.C. recommendation, a non-resident mooring fee of $6.00 per 
linear foot was adopted. This represents a $2.. 00 per foot increase to non-Swampscott residents. 
The rationale for setting different rates for residents and non-residents is based upon the fact that 
residents, with their real estate taxes, support ancillary services such as those provided by Police, 
Fire, and Public Works Departments as well as infrastructure improvements and Town Hall 
administrative fiinctions associated with the waterfront. 

The Harbor Advisory Committee has for many years been bringing the town administration's 
attention the deplorable condition of the pier railings. We continue to do so with the eamest wish 
that our advice to remedy the chipping paint problem will be heeded. Very sharp paint shards 
continue to lift from the railing surface posing a serious threat to anyone running their hand along 
the railing. Failure to deal with the de-laminating paint will also leave the railings unprotected 
and will thus considerably shorten the life expectancy of the railings. 

The Harbor Advisory Committee, as the name stipulates ia an advisory group to the Board of 
Selectmen, to the Town Administrator, and to the community as a whole. Members are appointed 
for their expertise and special interest in waterfront related matters. As members, we appreciate 
the opportunity to be of service to the town; however, we fully realize that we are not the only 
source of good advice in matters pertaining to the waterfront. As such, we do sincerely solicit 
thoughts and ideas from any and all citizens with a view toward making the waterfront, a unique 
part of our town, an even better community resource. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Swampscott Harbor Advisory Committee 

William F. Hermessey 
Chairman 



95 



Harbormaster's Department 

Lawrence P. Bithell-Harbormaster 

Assistant Harbormasters 

Mounzer Aylouche 

Roger Bruley 
William Hennessey 

The 2007 boating season in Swampscott may be described as, in a word, delightful. Weekend 
weather was quite pleasant throughout the late Spring, Summer, and early Fall. Activity around 
the harbor was thus quite brisk. 

The number of vessels moored in Swampscott waters diminished slightly versus the previous 
year. This might be a corollary to prevailing extremely high fuel prices this season. In addition, 
diminished depth in the harbor due to shoaling and a general filling in of the mooring field since 
the last dredging project many years ago imposes limits on the number of vessels which may be 
safely moored here. Last year, we found it necessary to establish a waiting list for vessels over 
twenty-five feet in length and vessels having deep keels. 

As the principal public safety official upon Swampscott waters. Your Harbormaster is 
responsible for enforcing federal, state, and local ordinances as they affect the waterfront.. This 
encompasses many facets including: 

1 . With the assistance of the Town Clerk and the Town Treasurer, 
manages the mooring permit system. 

2. Establishes mooring equipment specifications tailored to specific 
vessels while at mooring. 

3. Inspects mooring equipment to assure compliance with specifications. 

4. Places mooring equipment in the harbor to assure proper spacing between 
boats while ascertaining that vessels are located where sufficient depth 
exists to accommodate draft and swing requirements. 

5. Patrols town waters with an eye toward boater and bather safety. 

6. Performs rescues at sea from time to time as necessary. 

7. Maintains town boat to assure suitability for its mission as an 
"emergency" vessel. 

8. With the staff of Assistant Harbormasters, participates in ongoing 
training under the auspices of the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training 
Council in conjunction with the North Shore Harbormasters Association. 

The purpose of the foregoing elements of your Harbormaster's function is to make certain that 
boating upon Swampscott waters remains a safe and wholesome recreational pursuit for all. 

2007 was the first full season for the new town boat. It performed as expected and should 
continue to do so for its estimated useful life of twenty-five years. Equipment on the boat 
including radar, a global positioning system, and a depth sounder provides the staff with that 



96 



which is necessary to perform our mission. This boat will suit the current staff and the next 
generation harbormaster and assistant harbormasters. Considerable time and energy went into 
training on the new boat to include familiarization with its state-of-the-art equipment. 

Your Harbormaster and Assistant Harbormasters continue to be active in the North Shore 
Harbormasters Association. This organization is comprised of Harbormasters Departments from 
Winthrop to Salisbury and all coastal communities in between. Because of our involvement in 
this association, a Swampscott is eligible to compete for a $1,000.00 college scholarship 
sponsored by the N.S.H.A. Mutual aid is also available when necessary. 

This year, the department bid farewell to Assistant Harbormaster Don Petersen. Don's service 
to the department shall be greatly missed. We were fortunate to secure the services of Mounzer 
Aylouche as a new Assistant Harbormaster. Mounzer is a seasoned boater and he possesses 
considerable administrative skills which surely shall be of benefit to the boaters of Swampscott. 
Indeed, he has already enhanced the Harbormaster Department's web page on the Town web site. 
Other helpful additions to that site are planned. 

In order to assure success in accomplishing the mission of the Harbormaster's Department, 
cooperation of many individuals, organizations, boards, and committees is essential. We therefore 
extend our appreciation to Town Meeting, to the Capital Improvement and Finance Committees, 
to the Board of Selectmen, to the Police, Fire, and Public Works Departments, to the staffs of the 
Town Clerk and Treasurer, and to the Town Administrator. To the Swampscott Yacht Club for 
the use of their launch service and for other considerations, thanks for your help as well. Very 
special appreciation is extended to the Assistant Harbormasters who devote so much time and 
effort on a voluntary basis. Finally, to the boaters whom we serve, thank you for your cooperation 
and good will, for it is you who ultimately make boating in Swampscott such a wholesome and 
pleasurable pastime. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lawrence P. Bithell-Harbormaster 

William F. Hennessey-Assistant Harbormaster 



97 



ANNUAL REPORT BOARD OF HEALTH JULY 1, 2006THROUGH JUNE 30, 2007 



Nelson Kessler, Chairman of the Board of Health May 2006 to present 
Dr. Martha Pitman, Member, Board of Health 
Dr. Larry Block, Member, Board of Health 

Jeffrey Vaughan, Director of Public Health 
Jessica Vincent RN BSN, Public Health Nurse 

The Board of Health continues to be committed to promoting health and well being for the 
residents of Swampscott. The Board of Health values the importance of educating residents in many 
areas of public health and safety. As well, the Health Department works with many other departments 
and communities to ensure a sound environment 

TRASH & RECYCLING 

Trash and recycling continue to be a big part of the Board of Health's day-to-day operation. The 
Health Department deals with multiple phone calls, questions, requests and complaints many of which 
need to be investigated before they can be resolved. Our recycling contracts, as well as the rubbish 
contract, is with Hiltz Disposal. DeRosa Landfill Management is utilized for the recycling needs of the 
Schools and Municipal buildings. 

Recycling continues under the direction of the Chairman of Recycling Committee, Nelson 
Kessler. The Board urges all Swampscott residents to recycle more diligently as it is beneficial to the 
town, both ecologically and economically. 

Our contract with Hiltz Disposal has provisions for increased limits and bulk items. There was a 
drop-off area at the Department of Public Works yard on Paradise Road for the disposal of white goods 
(i.e.: washing machines, dryers, hot water heaters) and light clean iron only . This is different from the 
past metal drop-off days as we will not accept mixed materials. For example: bicycles must have all 
rubber tires and plastic removed before disposal. We will NOT accept any refrigerators, freezers, air 
conditioners or microwave ovens. This is very important. Any materials that are not deemed recyclable 
will be returned to the Town of Swampscott and cost the taxpayers to dispose of it in an alternative way. 
If this system is abused it will be terminated. 

In the past year, the Board of Health sponsored two (2) Cathode Ray Tubes drop-offs (CRTs). 
We collected approximately five hundred twenty (520) televisions and computer monitors, as well as 
seventy-two (72) microwave ovens and various other electronic devices. 

In 2006, hazardous waste drop-off was held in conjunction with the Marblehead Board of Health 
for both communities. We accepted one hundred seventy-four (174) carloads of waste products. 

There were six (6) curbside leaf pickups. Also, the residents wishing to dispose of yard waste 
could purchase a sticker through the Department of Public Works for fifty dollars ($50.00) and bring their 
leaves and grass clipping up to the Landscape Gardeners facility on Swampscott Road. 

RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS 

Yearly inspecfions include approximately seventy (70) establishments in the Town of 
Swampscott. If a restaurant fails, Jeffrey Vaughan makes follow-up visits until that establishment is in 
compliance with the State Health and Sanitary codes. Yearly, the Health Department sends out permits 
to these establishments. 

BEACH TESTING 

Beach testing is performed weekly. We have seven (7) beaches that are required to be tested 
throughout the summer. During the 2006 beach season we had three incidents where the beach water 
exceeded limits of acceptable standards while testing, all of which occurred during or soon after heavy 
rains. Signs were posted at the main entrance of the effected beaches stating "No Swimming" unfil 
follow-up tests revealed acceptable results. Fisherman's Beach was affected the most by storm water 
runoff. The Board of Health recommends no swimming at town beaches within twenty-four hours of 
heavy rainstorms. 



98 



EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

The Swampscott Health Department is a participant in the North Shore - Cape Ann Emergency 
Preparedness Coalition, a fifteen (15) community coalition that meets monthly to plan resources and 
responses to public health threats and emergencies. Such emergencies would include terrorism and 
outbreaks of infectious diseases. The coalition has developed a website to enhance the communities' 
collective capacity to share these resources and to create a database of medical and non-medical 
volunteers. 

The Board of Health encourages all residents to visit nscalert.org to help better prepare 
themselves for emergency situations and to volunteer in emergencies. 



CLINICS 
INFLUENZA 

The Board of Health conducted four (4) public flu clinics this past year. These clinics were held at 
Congregation Shirat Hayem of the North Shore (2) and the Swampscott Senior Center (1). Jessica 
Vincent along with volunteer nurses and student nurses from Salem State College were able to immunize 
approximately eight hundred and fifty (800) residents. The flu clinics were very successful due to the 
many clerical and nurse volunteers that came forward to participate. We would like to thank Rabbi Levy 
for the use of the Congregation Shirat Hayem facilities. The Public Health Nurse billed all senior health 
plans for the administration costs and collected a total of seven thousand two hundred seventy-one 
dollars. ($7,271.93) 

The Health Department thanked the volunteers of the flu clinics with a luncheon. We appreciate 
their support and commitment. 

BLOOD PRESSURE 

Jessica Vincent RN BSN performed twelve (12) scheduled evening blood pressure clinics at the 
Senior Center. The Health Department would like to thank volunteer, Mary Curtis, RN, for conducting 
afternoon blood pressure clinics on a continuous basis. 

HEPATITIS A 

The Board of Health continues to offer the Hepatitis A program to Swampscott food handlers. 
HEPATITIS B 

Hepatitis B vaccines continue for eligible town employees. Each new town worker for the 
Department of Public Works, Police Department, Fire Department and School Department may choose to 
be immunized against Hepatitis B. This is recommended especially for first responders who would be 
more at risk. Several employees were immunized in the past twelve months. 

TUBERCULOSIS 

The Public Health Nurse tested over fifty (50) Bertram House employees for Tuberculosis. The 
Bertram House purchased the solution and supplies. 

PNEUMOCOCCAL 

The Swampscott Health Department offers Pneumococcal vaccine to ail eligible residents in the 
town. Several vaccinations were given out this year. In addition, plans were initiated to offer 
Pneumococcal vaccine during next year's Influenza Clinics. 

IMMUNIZATIONS 
DISPENSEMENT 

Each month the Public Health Nurse travels to Tewksbury State Hospital for the Massachusetts 
Public Health Nurses meeting. At this time she also picks up any immunizations that will be needed by 
the doctors in the Town of Swampscott. The public health nurse logs in the lot numbers and expiration 
dates and dispenses the medications as needed. This includes all of the flu vaccine immunizations that 
the doctors are allotted by the State of Massachusetts. It is also the responsibility of the public health 
nurse to account for all the vaccinations that are returned by the doctors for any reason. These 



99 



medications must then be returned to Tewl<sbury State Hospital. The Public Health Nurse also took part 
in monthly meetings to network with other communities held at the Tewksbury State Hospital. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

Our Public Health Nurse tracked all communicable diseases in the town, watching closely for any 
clusters or outbreaks. The Public Health Nurse works closely with the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health (MDPH), school nurses, and doctor's offices. 

PEDICULOSIS 

In response to Head Lice outbreaks at daycares/preschools in Swampscott, the Public Health 
Nurse conducted assessments of all children enrolled in the centers. She also gave informational fliers 
for the centers to distribute to parents, and monitored the centers- conducting follow-up visits when 
needed. 



GRANTS 



MASSACHUSETTS INTERLOCAL INSURANCE ASSOCIATION 

The Swampscott Health Department was given grant money from the Massachusetts Interlocal 
Insurance Association to perform health educational programs to the Municipal Employees who 
participate in the insurance program. Some of the programs offered this year were: cooking demo, 
therapeutic chair massage, and yoga. We would like to thank the Public Library and Fire Department for 
helping to make these programs such a great success. 

NORTHSHORE & CAPE ANN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS COALITION 

The Northshore & Cape Ann Emergency Preparedness Coalition received a grant from the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health to respond to public health threats and emergencies such as 
bio-terrorism and outbreaks of infectious disease. 

The monies received by the North Shore and Cape Ann Emergency Preparedness Coalition must 
be earmarked for Health Department needs only. The money cannot be turned over to the general funds. 
The City of Salem is the host community and disperses funding to each community in accordance with 
population and need. 

CAMP INSPECTIONS 

In June of each year, the Director and Public Health Nurse inspected seven (7) summer camps for 
the purpose of meeting the regulations developed by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and 
local rules. This is another state required mandate that must be done for the safety of our children. This 
inspection included a thorough investigation of the campsite to insure that the environment was safe for 
the attending children. 

• Safe structures and equipment • CORI and SORI checks for all 

• Sanitary facilities employees 

• Adequate supervision of the campers • To ensure that there is a health 
at all times supervisor on site over the age of 

• Plans and protocols in place for eighteen (18) who knows first aid and 
medical emergencies, including CPR 

medicine administration, natural and • Up to date immunization records for 

physical disasters staff and campers 

• Sufficient health care coverage 

• Injury and fire prevention protocols 



WEST NILE VIRUS PROTOCOL 

The Board of Health continues to support the West Nile protocol, which was developed in 
conjunction with the Pesticide Awareness Committee and North East Mosquito Control and Wetlands 
Management District. The Swampscott Board of Health is also investigating other methods of combating 
the mosquito problem that will be safe for the environment and residents of Swampscott 



100 



INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES 

The Health Director and Public Health Nurse published several articles in the Swampscott Reporter, 
thanks to George Derringer for his assistance. 

• Sun Safety Tips 

• Cancer Incident Rates 

• Mosquito Borne Disease Education 

In addition, the Swampscott Board of Health manages the information board at the Town Hall with 
informational brochures. 

CONFERENCES ATTENDED 

The Health Department attended conferences or were educated in the following: 

• Massachusetts Health Officers Association Conference 

• Immunization Updates 

• Medicare Billing 

• Swimming Pool Operations 

• Pandemic Influenza 

• Emergency Dispensing Sites 

• Smallpox 

AWARDS 

HealthLink, the non-profit North Shore environmental group, honored board of Health member, Dr. Larry 
Block. Dr. Block was praised for his key leadership role in creating sound Public Health policy for his 
work with organic pesticide plan and the Board of Health's Mercury in Fish Advisory. 

MIIA Well Aware Program (Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association) 

The MIIA program conducts health awareness activities to town employees. The Public Health Nurse 
and Sandra Sarni (MIIA representative for Swampscott) organized the following activities: 

• Chair Massage 

• Yoga 

• Healthy Grilling Demonstration 

• Health 2006 Program 

OTHER POINTS OF INTEREST 

The Health Department participates in the following; 

• The Senior Outreach Committee 

• Health Advisory Committee 

The Health Department continues to offer a sponsorship program with Salem State College. A 
nursing student could spend an internship with the Department of Public Health to get perspective on 
Public Health Nursing and the duties and responsibilities associated with the Department of Health. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

The Town of Swampscott welcomed one hundred forty-six (146) new residents with males 
outnumbering the females. There were eighty-five (85) males and sixty-one (61) females born. 
Congratulations to all! 

This year there were two hundred nine (209) deaths in Swampscott. The leading cause of death 
was cardiac conditions followed by respiratory failure and various cancer conditions. 

In closing, we would like to thank all the dedicated staff and volunteers for making July 2006 through June 
2007 a very dynamic and triumphant time for the Board of Health. 



101 



SWAMPSCOTT HISTORICAL COMMISSON 2007 ANNUAL REPORT 



The members of the Swampscott Historical Commission oversaw the transportation of our archives to its 
temporary location at the former Temple Israel. We were able to walk around the empty Town Hall to make 
sure all articles of historic value were removed. We discovered some treasures for our archives such an 
1850's balance scale, a couple of old ballot boxes and some century tax records. We photographed the 
interior and exterior of the Town Hall before the project started. 

Our 4''' annual Preservation and Restoration Awards were presented in June 2007. The awards were 
given in recognition of those individuals and whose restoration embodied the goals of preserving, protecting 
and celebrating Swampscott's historic architecture and unique sense of place. 

For the 5* consecutive year, the Historical Commission distributed its book, "Swampscott Massachusetts, 
Celebrating 150 Years" to all third graders in Swampscott. Members of the Commission presented the books 
to the students, who study the history of Swampscott as part of their third grade curriculum. 

The Lady Deborah Moody Lilac Grove is nearing completion. The plaques had to be redesigned as the 
originals ones did not hold up to our harsh New England winters. 

In October, 2006 the Historical Commission received a "Pioneer in Partnership" award from the Essex 
National Heritage Commission. The Historical Commission was recognized as an organization that 
exemplifies the ENHC spirit of collaboration through our initiatives in building partnerships that preserve and 
celebrate historic, cultural and natural resources of Essex County. 

We are anxious to return our archives back to the third floor of the newly renovated Town Hall. We hope 
to oversee the placement of the photographs and artifacts that were placed in our custody. 

The Commission would like to thank the Board of Selectmen and Andrew Maylor for their continued 
support of our efforts to preserve Swampscott's history and heritage. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Jean F. Reardon, Chairperson 




* 



102 



7/1/06-6/30/07 



SWAMPSCOTT HOUSING AUTHORITY 

James L. Hughes, Chairman 



Albert DiLisio 
Barbara Eldridge 



Marianne McGrath 
Patricia Krippendorf 



Due to the continuing financial constraints placed on the Housing Authorities throughout the state 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community 
Development (DHCD), major modernization projects in public housing are still on hold except for major 
emergencies. The Swampscott Housing Authority has had to adjust its goals accordingly; therefore, 
during Fiscal Year 2007-2008, the prime focus of the Authority has been on quality of tenant life issues. 
Executive Director, Donna McDonald has continued to address issues of quality of life in our public 
housing communities. 

In 2007 the Swampscott Housing Authority the Authority temporarily suspended the policy of not 
accepting applications for housing for units at the family housing. The Executive Director recommended 
to the Board of Governors the opening of the waiting lists for the two bedroom and the three bedroom 
units in the family housing complex at the Margaret Kelly Family Housing Community for thirty (30) days 
in August, 2007. In the thirty days that the lists were open, the Authority received over 300 applications 
for family housing; the two and three bedroom unit housing lists were closed on August 31, 2007. In May, 
2007 DHCD notified the Authority that the Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program (MRVP) which had 
been "frozen" for over ten years was "unfrozen". The Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program (MRVP) is 
a low income housing program initiated by the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community 
Development and administered by the Swampscott Housing Authority. In the State Voucher Program, 
qualified applicants receive a certificate from the State through the Housing Authority allowing the 
applicant to lease privately owned housing in Massachusetts with a guaranteed State subsidy. In the 
past, the Swampscott Housing Authority was allocated as many as twenty certificates however, due the 
long term pressures on the State budget, surrendered certificates or certificates lost to tenants moving out 
of town were not replaced. Over the years the number of active certificates has dwindled to two active 
certificates which have been administered from the commencement of the MRVP in the 1980's. In May, 
2007 the Swampscott Housing Authority was allotted one additional certificate and that certificate was 
awarded to an applicant who has found housing in Swampscott. In December, 2007, the Authority was 
allotted four (4) additional certificates. The four (4) certificates have been distributed to qualified 
applicants. Of the four certificates, three have found housing in Lynn and Beverly, only one certificate will 
remain in Swampscott. Five new certificates have resulted in a net gain of two certificates to the Authority 
for administration. 

The Authority was able to make two major improvements at little or no cost to the Authority. The 
first major improvement was the metering of each of the six buildings at Duncan Terrace for gas service. 
Keyspan Energy Co. provided gas meters for each building at Duncan Terrace. Previously, there was 
only one meter for the whole complex. Separate meters allowed for an upgrade of the gas distribution 
system and a more efficient method of determining usage. The second major improvement also involves 
Keyspan. Through its Energy Action Program, Keyspan is providing and installing new, energy efficient 
gas boilers and updated, digital thermostats for 34 units at the Margaret Kelly Family Housing 
Community. These new boilers and thermostats will be a significant upgrade from the older equipment, 
many of which are original equipment over 50 years old. 

William (Bill) Colety, an employee of the Authority for over 20 years, retired in December, 2006. 
We all thank Bill for his years of service to the Authority and the tenants as the Maintenance Supervisor 
and wish Bill good health and the best of luck in his retirement. We welcomed aboard John Fernandes, 
Bill Colety's replacement as Maintenance Supervisor, and wish John the best of luck in his new endeavor. 

The Housing Authority has continued its relationship with a specialized soft-ware developer, Sam 
Stone of CyberSense Training & Consulting. Mr. Stone, a life-long Swampscott resident has developed 
software specifically for the smaller housing authorities. The regular use of the specialized software has 
led more efficient administration of over one hundred public housing units. The Swampscott Housing 
Authority continues to cooperate with the sponsoring churches and synagogues of Swampscott and with 



103 



the Swampscott Senior Center in ttie distribution of donated food at Duncan Terrace and Dotierty Circle. 
Once a month, the Inter-Faith Food Pantry provides free food for elderly and handicapped residents of 
Duncan Terrace and Doherty Circle. Many of the residents of our elderly/handicapped communities count 
on these bags of groceries, so generously provided by the Food Pantry, to tie them over to the beginning 
of the month. The tenants and the Authority are very grateful to the Inter-Faith Food Pantry, the 
Swampscott Senior Center personnel and the volunteers of each of the organization for their generous 
contribution of time and money to our needy and infirmed. 

Once again the Swampscott Housing Authority would like to thank Swampscott Police Patrolman, 
Saverio (Savy) Caruso for his invaluable assistance as the Swampscott Police Department liaison to the 
Housing Authority. The Authority wishes to acknowledge the assistance of the Swampscott Fire and 
Police Departments and the Action Ambulance Company for their consistently professional, yet 
compassionate demeanor while responding to the numerous medical assistance and "Are You Ok Calls" 
especially at the elderly/handicapped communities. The Swampscott Housing Authority would also like to 
acknowledge the contributions of other Town departments and officials to the fulfillment of the Housing 
Authority mission of providing safe, sanitary, low cost housing to qualified tenants. We gratefully 
acknowledge the efforts of Gino Cresta and the Department of Public Works for many services, especially 
the sanding and salting the elderly housing parking lots during the winter, the Wire Inspector, Jim Samms 
and the Plumbing Inspector Peter McCarriston as well as, Fire Prevention Officer, the Health Department 
and the Swampscott FEMA Director, Bruce Gordon. 

In the April, 2007, Marianne McGrath was reappointed to the Board of Governors by Governor 
Romney. We wish to congratulate Marianne McGrath for her reappointment to a five (5) year term as the 
Governor's appointed member of the Swampscott Housing Authority Board of Governors. 

The Board of Governors, the Executive Director, and the staff of the Swampscott Housing 
Authority continue to be committed to providing safe, comfortable and affordable housing for qualified 
tenants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James L. Hughes 
Chairperson 



104 



SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC LIBRARY 



The library is completing another highly successful year. It is an effectively 
functioning facility with an abundance of valuable materials. It is now open 56 hours 
per week, which includes four mornings for our senior citizens and mothers with young 
children and four evenings for our working patrons, we are also open from 9-5 on 
Saturdays, except during the summer months 

We have increased our circulation by over 7,000 items this year including books, 
magazines, CD's, videos and books on tape. We have more than 10,000 registered 
borrowers at the library. Over 4000 adults and children have attended our programs. 
Volunteers have donated more than 2,000 hours of help. 

The constant state of activity in the building gives evidence to our 
success. At almost any hour, every computer station is occupied, the tables in both 
the fiction and the browsing room are filled and the Children's room is alive with 
activity. Townspeople have been coming to the 

library and availing themselves of all of our up-to-date technology. We now have more 
than 20 computers in the library for public use. Over the past year approximately 375 
people per week access the Internet at the Swampscott Public Library. Many of these 
do so to check their e-mail, do Internet searches, search magazine databases and 
produce word processing documents. We have installed WI-FI in the library for those 
patrons who bring their own laptops and wish to access the Internet from any corner of 
the building. The library's website is up and running and is proving to be of great 
interest to the public. Patrons can check on the availability of a book from home and 
even reserve it themselves. No one has to worry about overdue books anymore, since 
anyone with a home computer, which has an Internet connection, can renew their 
items from home. The library has offered a variety of adult programs 

throughout the year. We host several book discussion groups, a Swampscott history 
discussion group, guest speakers, computer training classes, and a program called 
"Practically Speaking" which allows our new Russian immigrants to practice their 
English speaking skills. This year we instituted the Chorover Author series, which has 
been extremely successful. We have hosted numerous popular authors including, 
Elinor Lipman, Laura Zigman, Michael Palmer, Dennis Lehane to name a few, here at 
the library. 

The Children's Room has been re-carpeted this year with funding from Capital 
Improvement Committee and some new book shelves have been purchased by the 
Friends of the Library to enhance this very popular area. The Children's department 
has continued with its high quality programming throughout the year. The children's 
librarians have continued to do outreach program to the preschools and kindergarten 
and first grade classes in town. They bring materials from the library to these schools 
and run library programs for the teachers, in an effort to develop the next generation of 



105 



readers and library patrons. The librarians host many of the students from our 
elementary schools for classes to teach them about the library and about all of its 
resources The library has continued to seek out grant monies and any additional 
available funding for projects and enhancements. We received an $8,000 LSTA grant 
from the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners to help us serve the small and 
home-based businesses in our community. We received an ARTS lottery grant for a 
Children's program, a grant from the Unitarian Universalist Church of Greater Lynn for a 
Family program and a NMRLS (Northern Massachusetts Regional Library System)grant 
to purchase up to date computer books. The Library also hosted the 

second annual Lee Golomb Cadiff Teen Poetry Contest which is open to any 
Swampscott middle school or high school student. Cash prizes, funded in memory of 
Mrs. Cadiff, are awarded to those students whose poetry entry was selected by the Tin 
Box Poets of Swampscott. 

The Friends of the Swampscott Public Library continue to be very supportive of library 
activities. They purchase rental books for those patrons who don't wish to be placed on 
a waiting list for a best seller. They have purchased numerous museum passes for our 
patrons' use (Children's Museum, Science Museum, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, 
John F. Kennedy Library, The Peabody/Essex Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, The 
House of Seven Gables, and Zoo New England.) The Friends also support summer 
children's programming, teen programming, pay for the printing and postage of our 
newsletter, and help to defray the costs of refreshments for our adult programs. The 
library could never offer as many services and programs without the help of the Friends. 

In conclusion, it is because of the dedication of the staff, and the Board of Trustees 
and the Friends of the Library that the Swampscott Public Library can offer so many 
services and materials to the town. It is because of the support of the townspeople that 
the library is a success. 



BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 



Carl Reardon, Chair 



John Karwowski, Vice Chair 
Secretary. 



Joanne vanderBurg, 



LIBRARY STAFF 



FULL TIME 



Alyce Deveau, Director 
Susan Conner, Assistant Director 



Sandra Moltz, Reference Librarian 
Circulation 



Maureen McCarthy, Head of 



PART TIME 



Elizabeth Coughlin, Children's Librarian 
Marcia Harrison, Cataloguer 
Barbara Wermuth, Tech Aide 



Israella Abrams, Children's Librarian 
Ann Nechtem, Library Assistant 
Penny Longhurst, Library Assistant 



106 



Yelena Kuzmina, Tech Aide 
Assistant 

Joanne Janakas, Library Aide 
Maralyn Keay, Library Aide 
Nettie Harrington, Library Aide 
Jeannette Curuby, Reference 



Dorothy Forman, Administrative 

Marie Epstein, Library Aide 
Cynthia Zeman, Library Aide 
Angela Carvahio, Library Aide 



OFFICERS OF THE FRIENDS OF THE SWAMPSCOTT LIBRARY 



Carol Shutzer , President Sidney Epstein, Treasurer 

Vacant -Vice President Patricia Bradford, Clerk 

Alison Kenney, Asst. Clerk Barbara Wermuth, Asst. Treasurer 



Respectfully submitted, 
Alyce Deveau, Director 



107 



MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 



The MBTA Advisory Board is made up of representatives from 175 cities and towns that are 
serviced by the MBTA, The office is located at 177 Tremont Street 4th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 
02110-1020. Paul Regan is the Executive Director. The telephone number is (617) 426-6054 Fax (617- 
451-2054. E-mail: advbrd ©erols.com; web site: www.mbtaadvisoryboard.org. The function of the Board 
is to advise tiie MBTA on policy matters and approve the operating budget. The Advisory Board's budget 
can be no more tiiat one-quarter of one percent of the MBTA assessments on cities and towns. For tiie 
2007 calendar year, tiie Advisory Board budget was $357,283. 

The chairman is David Cohen, tiie Mayor of Newton, Vice Chairmen is Mayor McGlynn of Medford 
and Margaret Ishihara of Wareham; the derk is Vineet Gupta of Boston. 

Meetings of tiie full Advisory Board were held on October 23, 2006,, April 3, 2007, and May 24. 
2007. At the end of the May 24th meeting, the building had to be evacuated forcing tiie meeting to 
adjourn abnjptiy. All meetings were held on tiie second floor of the State Transportation Building at 10 
Park Plaza in Boston. 

The MBTA services tiie Town of Swampscott directiy through buses and commuter rail, and 
indirectiy by the Blue Line, when commuters drive to Wonderland in Revere and park arKi board tiie Blue 
Line ti-ains for Boston. Some commuters take the Marblehead-Swampscott bus to Wonderland and 
transfer to the Blue Line. The Blue line extension to Lynn has been approved by congress and will 
probably be completed by 2012. The latest fain and bus schedules, with changes four times a year, are 
available at Fiory's Variety Store, tiie Town clerk's office, the Swampscott Public library, arxl several otiier 
place around town. You can buy commuter rail tickets at Fiory's Variety Store. THE RIDE, (the MBTA's 
parati-ansit service), which ti^nsports people with disabilities is administered by die Greater Lynn Senior 
Services, Inc. (GLSS), 105 Summit Drive, Peabody, MA 01960. The telephone is (978-573-9300) More 
information can be obtained from ttie Swampscott Council on Aging at 781-596-8866. 

Some items ttiat may be of interest to tiie citizens of Swampscott include: 

1. Swampscott's MBTA assessment for FY 2007 was $287,666. 

2. Some of the new Blue Line cars are slowly arriving and will gradually replace the older one. 

3. Renovations continue on some of the Blue Line station so tiiey all will be able to accommodate 
^ car trains. 

4. The last brass MBTA token on tiie MBTA system was sold at Government Center at 10:23 A.M. 

on December 6, 2006. 

5. The modernization of tiie Charles/MGH station on tiie Red Line was completed and dedicated 
on March 27, 2007. 



108 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council Annual Report 

Created in 1963, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) promotes inter-local 
cooperation and advocates for smart growth by working closely with cities and towns, state and 
federal agencies, non-profit institutions, and community-based organizations in the 101 cities and 
towns of Metropolitan Boston. MAPC strives to provide leadership on emerging issues of regional 
significance by conducting research, building coalitions, and acting as a regional forum for action. 

MAPC provides technical assistance and specialized services in land use planning, water 
resources management, transportation, housing, environmental protection, economic 
development, public safety, geographic information systems (GIS), collective purchasing, data 
analysis and research, legislative and regulatory policy, and the facilitation and support of inter- 
local partnerships. More information is available at www.mapc.orq . 

MAPC is governed by 101 municipal government appointees, 21 gubernatorial appointees, and 
13 appointees of state and City of Boston agencies. An Executive Committee comprising 25 
elected members oversees agency operations. The agency employs approximately 40 
professional staff under the leadership of an executive director. Funding for MAPC activities is 
derived from governmental contracts and foundation grants, and a per-capita assessment on 
member municipalities. 

To better serve the people who live and work in Metro Boston, MAPC has divided the region into 
eight subregions. Each subregion is overseen by a council of local leaders and stakeholders, and 
a staff coordinator provides organizational and technical staff support. 



Advancing Smart Growth 

MAPC's MetroFuture: Making a Greater Boston Region initiative is planning for Metro Boston's 
growth and development through 2030. In 2007, the project involved nearly 1,000 people (on top 
of the 4,000 who participated in previous years). MAPC presented the MetroFuture plan at a 
May 1 Boston College Citizen Seminar, where participants overwhelmingly voted to ratify it and 
work for its implementation. MAPC is now developing an implementation strategy, addressing 
public policy, public funding priorities, and changes in practice within the private sector. By mid- 
2008, MetroFuture will transition from a planning initiative to an advocacy program, uniting the 
efforts of MAPC, partner organizations, and the thousands of "plan-builders" in an effort to alter 
regional priorities and growth patterns consistent with the new plan. 

As a member of the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance, MAPC helped form the 
Transportation Investment Coalition. This group of business, environmental, public interest, and 
planning organizations is pressing for savings, efficiencies, and new revenues to address the 
state transportation finance deficit. The Alliance joined with others to advocate successfully for an 
increase in the Commonwealth's Bond Cap, increasing the resources available to address the 
state's capital needs. Through the Alliance, MAPC is also working to reform the state's arcane 
zoning laws through a new and diverse commission, chaired by Undersecretary for Economic 
Development Gregory Bialecki. 

MAPC provides planning assistance and expertise to communities on a wide range of issues, 
helping them envision the future and evaluate alternatives within a smart-growth framework. 
Residents of Maiden are taking a long-range look at their city through the Maiden Vision Project, 
which kicked off last year with a city-wide visioning workshop attended by 250 participants. MAPC 
helped the town of Arlington deal with housing and economic development issues with a 
visioning workshop and resident survey, and helped develop new bylaws and other strategies. 
MAPC also assisted Walpole and Norfolk in developing and analyzing alternative growth 
scenarios along a shared stretch of Route 1A. 



109 



Working with the 495/IVIetroWest Corridor Partnership, MAPC produced a WaterSmart 
Indicators report that details trends in water supply, wastewater, and stormwater for each city 
and town in the study area. MAPC also completed water resource strategies for three towns in 
the Assabet Watershed to evaluate the environmental impacts of alternative growth patterns, 
relying in part on hydrologic modeling conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. 



Collaboration for Excellence in Local Government 

Through its Metro Mayors Coalition, MAPC helped 21 communities secure over $2 million in 
Shannon Grant funding over the past two years to implement multi-jurisdictional, multi- 
disciplinary strategies to combat youth violence, gang violence, and substance abuse. In 2007, 
Gov. Deval Patrick and more than 240 mayors, police chiefs, safety officials and violence 
prevention workers participated in the coalition's third annual Community Safety Summit to 
advance strategies to curia youth violence. Through its newly created North Shore Coalition, 
MAPC is facilitating discussions to develop a regional, comprehensive mutual aid system. 

Cities and towns now have the option of joining the Massachusetts Group Insurance Commission 
(GIC) with a new law drafted by MAPC and the Municipal Health Insurance Working Group. 
This option will help communities save millions of dollars each year by taking advantage of lower 
insurance rates available through the GIC. MAPC facilitated the Working Group and helped to 
build consensus for the proposal. We are now providing technical support to cities, towns, and 
regional entities who are interested in joining the GIC. 

MAPC has convened Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford and Somerville to develop a 
shared strategy for the Mystic River corridor. The river, which runs through dense urban 
communities, has long been an underutilized asset. The communities will develop a 
comprehensive picture of activities along the river and will seek to build a shared strategy for 
future development and use of the waterway. 

MAPC collaborated with the Commonwealth's 12 other regional planning agencies, municipal 
officials and other local leaders to help produce "A Best Practices Model for Streamlined 
Local Permitting." The result of dozens of focus groups and a statewide permitting survey, the 
document provides an array of recommendations that municipalities can consider to create a 
more clear, efficient and predictable permitting process without compromising local standards of 
development review. The guide is available at www.mass.qov/mpro . 



Collaboration for Public Safety 

MAPC performs fiduciary, planning, and project management duties for the Northeast Homeland 
Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC), a network of 85 cities and towns north and west 
of Boston. In 2007, MAPC helped to develop the School Threat Assessment Response System 
(STARS), an emergency planning toolkit for each school district in the region. With the assistance 
of MAPC, NERAC provided portable radios programmed for the Boston Area Police Emergency 
Radio Network, enabling real-time radio communications among police, fire, and other first 
responders during major emergencies. In the past year, NERAC established an online 
information clearinghouse for police and fire departments, and began planning for emergency 
evacuations from a regional perspective. MAPC also helped NERAC to set up three regional 
crime mapping centers that use GIS to visualize crime data through maps. 

MAPC completed Pre-Disaster Mitigation (PDM) plans for nine communities in 2007, on top of 
the 20 completed in recent years. Each plan includes an inventory of critical facilities and 



110 



infrastructure, a vulnerability analysis, and a mitigation strategy with reconnmended actions. 
MAPC will continue working with 46 cities and towns in 2008. 



Collaboration for Municipal Savings 

MAPC's Regional Purchasing Consortia administered six procurements for 42 cities and towns, 
saving communities up to 20% on purchases such as office supplies, paving services, and road 
maintenance. Similar savings were realized by the 300 agencies that participate in the Greater 
Boston Police Council (GBPC), which is administered by MAPC. In fiscal year 2007, MAPC 
conducted seven procurements for various types of vehicles. Including police cruisers and heavy- 
duty trucks. Overall, 187 municipalities purchased 329 vehicles at an estimated cost of over $20 
million. 



Reliable Data, Available to All 

Since Its official launch in February, MAPC's MetroBoston Data Common online data and 
mapping tool has been used by dozens of constituents to create customized maps for developing 
grant applications, analyzing development proposals, or improving services. You can create 
maps, charts, and graphs on the Data Common by accessing www.metrobostondatacommon.orq . 
In addition to supporting this online tool, the Metro Data Center at MAPC responds to data 
requests from member communities, non-profit organizations, businesses, residents, students 
and other state agencies. 

In the past year, MAPC used visualization tools that combine CIS technology, photography and 
graphic design to help increase community awareness about proposed zoning bylaws in 
Bellingham and Dedham, and to Illustrate what different parts of the region would look like under 
IVIetroFuture. 



Charting a Course to Regional Prosperity 

MAPC developed its annual Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) for the 
region, in partnership with the US Economic Development Administration. The report contains an 
analysis of trends and conditions in the regional economy, highlighting challenges and 
opportunities. The economic analysis in the CEDS is targeted to front-line economic 
development staff working in the public and community-based sectors. 

Working for 12 contiguous urban communities in the Metro Mayors Coalition, MAPC is developing 
an inventory of potential development sites near municipal boundaries to support coordinated 
planning. MAPC also developed the Smart Workplace Project, a GIS map of smart-growth 
friendly sites for commercial and industrial development throughout the region. In collaboration 
with the University of Massachusetts Boston, MAPC is taking a regional look at the space needs 
of the life sciences industry. 

Working with the Immigrant Learning Center and the Commonwealth Corporation, MAPC 
convened academic, institutional and non-profit researchers to develop an immigration research 
agenda. 



Getting Around the Region 

MAPC produced a Regional Bicycle Plan, assessing current conditions and identifying the 
improvements necessary to create a more comprehensive regional bicycle transportation system. 



Ill 



The plan establishes updated goals based on previous plans, and identifies key strategies and 
priority projects. 

Under its new Regional Bike Parking Program, MAPC negotiated discount group purchasing 
contracts with three leading vendors of bicycle parking equipment. This allows MAPC 
municipalities and other public entities to purchase discounted equipment and, in some cases, to 
receive state or federal reimbursement for the cost. Communities around the region have used 
the program to put new racks at schools, libraries, parks, and shopping areas. The program will 
continue in 2008. 

In 2007 MAPC also began work on the Regional Pedestrian Plan. This plan will identify policies 
to make walking a convenient, safe, and practical form of transportation throughout the region. 
Proposed solutions will include best practices for local jurisdictions as well as steps that could be 
taken by the state or by the Metropolitan Planning Organization. 

MAPC has developed a web-based Parking Toolkit that addresses common parking issues. 
Cities and towns can learn how to do a parking study, how to reduce parking demand and 
manage supply, how to make use of existing parking, and how to finance parking improvements. 
The Parking Toolkit is the first in a series of Sustainable Transportation Toolkit products that 
MAPC will develop over the coming years. Visit http://transtoolkit.mapc.org to access these tools. 

Large portions of Massachusetts Avenue and Route 2A from Arlington to Concord are now a 
Massachusetts Scenic Byway, due to the efforts of MAPC, the Minuteman National Historic 
Park, and the towns of Arlington, Lexington, Lincoln, and Concord. MAPC is now preparing a 
Scenic Byway Corridor Management Plan, the first step in protecting the historic, scenic, and 
cultural qualities of the byway. 

In 2007, MAPC worked with developers and communities to evaluate the transportation impacts 
of dozens of projects, including the South Weymouth Naval Air Station redevelopment 
(SouthPield), Westwood Station, and Harvard University's new Allston campus. 



On Beacon Hill 

• Municipal Health Insurance: 

MAPC and the Municipal Health Insurance Working Group built consensus and drafted 
the new law allowing cities and towns to save millions of dollars each year by joining the 
Group Insurance Commission. 

• Shannon Community Safety Initiative: 

Over the last two years, MAPC's advocacy and grant development services have helped 
nearly two dozen communities to secure over $2 million in funding for interdisciplinary 
programs that focus on youth violence, drugs, and enforcement against gangs. 

• Statewide Population Estimates Program: 

A $600,000 line item in the 2008 budget will provide the State Estimates Program with 
more resources to prepare for the 2010 Census. This program will help correct the 
deficiencies of recent population estimates and to prevent similar deficiencies from 
occurring in 2010. 

• Surplus Land: 

MAPC continues to advocate for passage of a new policy on the disposition of surplus 
state land. Specifically, we continue to build support for our proposal that encourages 
smart growth development on surplus land while giving municipalities a meaningful role 
throughout the disposition process. 



112 



• Community Preservation Act: 

In 2007, the Metropolitan f^/layors Coalition and Community Preservation Coalition 
reached consensus around legislation to help more communities participate in the 
Community Preservation Act (CPA). The legislation, filed by Senator Cynthia Creem (D- 
Newton), would also secure adequate funding over the long term for the state's CPA 
matching fund. 

• Zoning Reform: 

The new zoning reform commission, initiated by the Massachusetts Smart Growth 
Alliance and chaired by Undersecretary for Economic Development Greg Bialecki, is now 
working to draft legislation dealing with such matters as "approval not required," 
grandfathering, consistency between master plans and zoning, and incentives to expand 
housing production. 



North Shore Task Force 

(Beverly, Danvers, Essex, Hamilton, Gloucester, Ipswich, Manchester by the Sea, Marblehead, 
Middleton, Nahant, Peabody, Rockport, Salem, Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham) 

During 2007, the North Shore Task Force took part in a variety of activities, including: 

> Reviewed and offered input into a variety of regional transportation programs, including the 
Transportation Improvement Program, the Unified Planning and Work Program and the 
Regional Transportation Plan, as well as opportunities to participate in Transportation 
Demand Management and Suburban Mobility programs. 

> Learned how to use visualization and community outreach techniques to build support for 
mixed-use projects and zoning bylaws. 

> Continued to enthusiastically engage with and serve as a key sounding board for the 
MetroFuture Regional Planning process, hosting a widely attended MetroFuture Forum in 
December of 2006 and continuing its support throughout 2007. 

> Received training from MAPC staff in how to use MetroBoston Data Common, an online tool 
providing data about the region and each of its cities and towns. It is a resource for all those 
wishing to better understand how the region and its communities are changing, and helps 
residents, planners, city and town officials, educators, and journalists explore options and 
make informed decisions. 

> Heard a presentation from the MA Renewable Energy Trust on progress in expanding 
renewable energy uses in the state and how communities can start to use renewable energy, 
and offered ideas on how alternative energy and conservation can play a key role in the 
MetroFuture Plan. 

> Collaborated with Tufts Urban and Environmental Policy graduate students to present an in- 
depth study of how the Town of Ipswich could use Chapter 40R to help diversify the town's 
housing supply and provide an alternative to the 40B housing process. 

> Used some of the latest work done by MAPC to see how communities can incorporate Low 
Impact Development principles ~ including meeting EPA Phase II stormwater requirements 
with new bylaws ~ through a combination of regulation, evaluation of existing development 
practices and stakeholder collaboration. 



113 



> Continued to offer downtown development and revitalization strategies as the Department of 
Housing and Community Development offered examples of and made a presentation on how 
to establish successful Business Improvement Districts (BIDs). 

> Reviewed ongoing municipal issues using Community Exchange at each meeting. 

> Developed a 2008 Topics Agenda that will continue the Task Force's effort to attract a large 
and diverse audience to its meetings by offering meetings focusing on: 

• Alternatives to Traditional Zoning 

• MetroFuture Implementation Strategies 

• Downtown Revitalization Strategies 

• Sustainable Municipal Energy Policy 

• Joint Legislative Meeting with North Shore Mayor's Coalition 

• Update on North Shore Open Space Protection: Impact of Community Preservation Act 
and Local Land Trusts 

• Case Studies of Successful Local Government Policy: What Works and Why 

• Case Studies on Successful Intra-Regional Agreements 

• Smart Growth and Preservation of Neighborhood Character. 

The MAPC Annual Report is respectfully submitted by Marc D. Draisen, Executive Director, 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council. 



114 




Amelia P. O'Malley 
Superintendent-Director 



ANNUAL REPORT (Short Form) 
JANUARY 1, 2007 - DECEMBER 31, 2007 



Mr. William Jackson - Swampscott Representative 
North Shore Regional Vocational School Committee 



Amelia P. O'Malley, Superintendent-Director 
North Shore Regional Vocational School District 



Merger Study In the spring of 2007 Phase II of the proposed merged school was completed. After 
requested changes to the design total estimated project cost was $140,642,1 14. In the fall of 2007, the 
Merger Oversight Committee and the North Shore Chamber of Commerce held a breakfast meeting for 
the elected officials in all 16 communities of the North Shore Regional Vocational School District. At 
this meeting the conceptual design was presented along with the estimated project cost. The accuracy of 
this figure is contingent on a completion date of August 2012. It is hoped that legislation delineating 
funding will be filed this winter. 

Administration The North Shore Regional Vocational School District Committee, comprised of one 
member appointed to represent each member community is the governing body of the School District. The 
Superintendent-Director and the administrative team carry out the policies of the District School Committee 
and oversee the daily operation of the school. 

Enrollment Student enrollment as of October 1, 2007 is 443. Students cite the interpersonal relationships 
with teachers, counselors, and administration, and the vocational/technical programs as the reasons for 
application. There continues to be a shortage of space for classrooms, shop areas, the library and the 
cafeteria. In addition, an auditorium is needed. 

Curriculum All students who entered in September of 2006 were enrolled in Algebra I. Introduction 
to Algebra is no longer offered. The 12"" grade continues to offer Discrete Mathematic as well as Pre- 
Calculus, Algebra II, and Business Math. The integration of technology continues with the use of the 
wireless laptops. Our MCAS preparation has been bolstered by the addition of interactive software 
entitled PLATO. During the lO"' grade, students are working in the computer labs with this program 
80% of the time. 

All of our science courses are aligned with the Massachusetts Science Frameworks, and for the 9^ and 
lO"' grades classes are sequenced in a manner to prepare students for the MCAS test. Since a science 
MCAS test is now required for graduation for this year's tenth graders, our underclassman now focus 
exclusively on biology. This concerted effort on a single domain will allow for more time to cover 
required strands, and will provide opportunities to develop more rigorous instructional strategies and 
methodologies in order to enhance success. 

As for the 12"^ grade, we offer three electives that will include: a new Human Biology class, a redesigned 
Physics curriculum, and a long time popular Field Studies in the Natural Sciences. 

The Social Studies Department is revising the scope and sequence to conform to the history curriculum 
framework and school schedule, 
irticipating Communities: 



werly Danvers Gloucester Lynnfield Marblehead Nahant Salem Topsfield 

{)xforcl Essex Hamilton Manchester-by-the-Sea Middleton Rockport Swampscott Wenham 



The foundation of the Title I program is a fifteen (15) station computer lab dedicated to utilizing Achieve 
SOOO/TeenBiz, a web-based, individualized reading and writing program which was created specifically 
for high school. 

MCAS Review The Massachusetts Department of Education awarded Grant #632 to North Shore 
Technical High School to assist those Junior and Senior students who have not yet reached the minimum 
score on the Math and/or English/Language Arts MCAS and to assist our current lO"' graders to reach 
proficiency on the MCAS test. 

The School Council is an organization of faculty, parents, students and business community 
representatives who meet with the Principal every six weeks during the school year to review programs 
and activities at North Shore Tech. 

General and Program Advisory Committees The Program Advisory Committees meets twice per year 
to discuss suggestions for improving our career vocational-technical programs. 

Career and Technical Areas / Service Cluster 

With the incorporation of the Vocational Technical Frameworks, the Career and Technical areas are 
working on aligning their curriculum and updating and creating new lesson plans were needed. Safety is 
also a primary concern with our goal not graduating any senior with out a career safe OSHA 10-hour 
card. In addition., students are maintaining their working portfolios and seniors will begin to create their 
Senior Showcase portfolio, which will help them in job interviews and during their college admission 
process. 

Cosmetology continues to learn to use state of the art techniques in haircutting, styling, up do, color, 
nail, and skin care. Students are also learning to incorporate technology in the many projects they 
complete and presentations they make. Junior and senior students welcome clients from the district for 
cosmetology services on Thursday and Friday. 

The addition of John Bickerstaff as an instructor has added additional instruction to our students. As 
required by the industry Culinary Arts students will receive a certificate in Serve Safe and will complete 
the Pro Start Curriculum. The Log Bridge bin is open to the public on Thursday and Friday allowing 
students to perfect their culinary skills. 

Design & Visual Communications was relocated next to the graphics department to allow a 
professional working relationship between the graphic's program and the commercial artist. 

The addition of the new technology in Graphics Communications Technology last year has added a 
necessary technological component to the program. 

Health Assisting Students are learning through skill-based activities and will begin visiting health 
centers in their sophomore year. Students will now complete the Certified Nursing Assistant program 
during their junior year allowing them to acquire additional certificates during their senior year such as, 
CPT, First Aid, AED, Home Health Aide, Introduction to Phlebotomy, EKG and an Alzheimer 
Certificate. 

Marketing, Office Technology and Video Media students have the ability to enhance their office 
technology skills while using the marketing concepts they are learning, finance, advertising, general 
merchandising and small business ownership. In addition, students are coordinating school wide 
activities, creating highlight tapes for our sports banquet and freshman parent night, and marketing a 
positive school moral. 

Career and Technical Areas / Technical Cluster 

Carpentry/Masonry - Junior and senior carpentry students are currently working on construction 
projects in Danvers and Hamilton. The junior carpenters are building a 30' x 34' 2-story garage on 
Asbury St., Hamilton. The project is an oversized two car garage with an above in-law apartment. The 

January 2007 - December 2007 2 



116 



senior carpenters are completing a farmer's porch that they started last year on Chevalier Ave, Danvers. 
Upon completion of the farmer's porch, the seniors will work on the garage in Hamilton. The masonry 
crews have completed work on the "Tramp House" historic building in Middleton, as well as a walkway 
and retaining walls in Danvers. They are currently building a storage/dugout building for the Danvers 
National Little League. 

Automotive/Collision Repair - These shops are both NATEF certified and provide a service to residents 
of the community while teaching trade skills and competencies to their students. Vehicles are serviced at 
a discount rate, and in return, students gain trade experience. This year the Collision Repair shop will 
continue with the Respiratory Protection Program in compliance with the Massachusetts Department of 
Education and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration. The Collision Repair Shop will begin 
the process of re-certifying their NATEF approval this occurs every five years. 

The Machine Technology Department, having successfully completed the process of obtaining their 
certification from the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) last year, will now concentrate 
on curriculum development including BattleBots for the junior and senior machinists. 

Information Systems Technology - This technical program prepares students for A+ Computer 
Certification, Network+ Certification , Cisco CCNA Certification , and MCDST Certification . Students 
will actively learn in a hands-on environment the fundamentals of Computer and Networking 
Technologies in order to meet the demands found in the fast growing industry of Information Technology 
and Telecommunications. Introduction to Computer Programming, Visual Basic, HTML, and Flash MX 
are included in the program, as well as an opportunity for students to work at the Help Desk which is 
responsible for maintaining, upgrading, and repairing over 300 computers and printers on our Local Area 
Network (LAN). 

This is the third year with the Electrical Program as a member of the Technical Cluster. The Electrical 
Shop is now a full program with exploratory through senior year curriculums. The shop space has been 
increased to accommodate the additional students. A second electrical instructor has been added to the 
program, allowing the upper classes to work on projects at North Shore Tech and within the district. 

Technology North Shore Tech purchased a total of twenty eight (28) new computer workstations during 
the school year 2006/2007. Ten (10) of these workstations were used to replace computers in the Library. 
Five (5) new workstations were installed in the Reading Lab. Six (6) new workstations were installed in 
the Auto Tech classroom, and two (2) laptops were purchased for the Science Department. In February 
we upgraded are Graphic Arts classroom with new computer furniture, seven (7) PC workstations and 
four (4) iMacs. Four computers, two laptops and two workstations were purchased for Administrative 
purposes. 

Teacher technology standards continue to improve. The Massachusetts Department of Education 
Teacher Self Assessment Test (TSAT) is distributed yearly to track progress. Many teachers are able to 
design developmentally appropriate learning opportunities that apply technology-enhanced instructional 
strategies to their curriculum in order to support the diverse needs of learners. A multitude of online tests 
and quizzes that our teachers are creating are provided on the school's Network and the Internet for 
student use. 

The science department purchased a textbook with an online component. All students are provided with 
accounts and trained in order to access their textbooks online. The online component also offers an 
audio version of the text, self-check quizzes, activities, online resources and audio-visuals to facilitate 
access to the curriculum by all learners. 

PLATO-MCAS software was procured through a grant. PLATO is a self-paced model which includes 
tutorials and mastery tests that can be individualized according to a student's needs from previous MCAS 
scores or tests. It also includes an MCAS express module that can be used as a thorough review for all 
sophomores prior to this spring's MCAS tests. All students participating in the after school MCAS 
tutorial program and students in grade 10 Essential Strategies classes are utilizing this software. 

January 2007 - December 2007 3 



117 



The school's web page is maintained and updated daily, ( www.nsths.mec.edu ) 



Professional Development Faculty members are asked to submit an overall review of what was 
learned when they attend conferences and workshops or when making on-site visits. This information 
was shared at staff improvement sessions. 

Special Education Department There are approximately 1 75 students at North Shore Technical High 
School who have been identified as having special needs; they represent 40% of the general student 
population. The special education program is inclusive in nature. Inclusion classes are offered in all 
grades and in every major academic subject area. Small group special education classes, with modified 
content, in English, Math, Science and Social Studies are offered to students in accordance with their 
Lidividualized Education Programs. One special education initiative this year is "Meeting the Behavioral 
and Social Needs of a Diverse Student Population." With grant funds, we continue to maintain a liaison 
with Brian LaCroix, a noted behaviorist and assistant professor at Salem State College. He is providing 
consultation to our teachers and staff with regard to student behavior. 

Athletic Department The programs are running well and the participation rate continues to be very 
high for a vocational school. Proposed new programs for the 2008-2009 school year are Girls Soccer and 
Boys Lacrosse. Both of these teams are anticipated to be co-op teams with Essex Aggie. Essex Aggie 
intends to start a co-op Girls Lacrosse team this spring (2008). 

Career Exploration The focus of the career exploratory program is to familiarize all ninth grade 
students with North Shore Technical High School's vocational/technical areas. Currently ninth 
graders explore thirteen vocational programs. The exploratory program is designed so each student spends 
five days, four periods in shop and four periods in academics every other week. 

School-to-Work/Placement Entering the world of work in the 2r' century takes more than 
vocational/technical skills or academic success. Li the 2006-07 school year 36% of students participated in 
the Cooperative Education Program. Each of these students worked during school time in their 
vocational/technical area on the job gaining experience and school credit. The class of 2007 saw 51% of the 
graduates matriculate at two or four year post-secondary institutions, 47% were placed in jobs related to 
their vocational/technical program and 2% of the graduates were undecided in their post-secondary plans. 
North Shore Technical High School continues to offer permanent placement service including career 
guidance to all graduates. 

Tech Prep North Shore Technical High School presently has articulation agreements covering four 
vocational areas with local community colleges. 

The School Social Worker/Adjustment Counselor works with the at-risk population who are identified 
and referred by faculty and administration. 

Health Office There were 2,985 visits to the school nurse during the 2006-2007 school year. This is a 
decrease of 807 visits from the previous school year. During an average day the nurse saw seventeen 
(1 7) students for health related concerns. The majority of students visited the nurse for headaches, 
generally not feeling well, and orthopedic muscular-skeletal problems. 

A significant upgrade to the Building and Grounds in 2007 was upgrading the video 
surveillance system. The outdated VHS tape drives were replaced with an 850 gigabyte hard 
drive system that allows better viewing and camera control. Students enrolled in electrical, masonry 
and carpentry continue to assist the facilities department with a number of projects in the school. 



January 2007 - December 2007 

118 



The Transportation Department lease purchased 2 new, 2006 model year 71 passenger school buses 
this year in an effort to update the fleet. 

Adult Evening Education at North Shore is a self-supporting program that offers more than sixty (60) 
vocational-technical classes that enhance the professional and personal lives of the adult members of our 
community. The Program serves nearly one thousand adult students participating in a wide variety of 
courses. Popular fields of study include: computers, health, construction, welding and machine technology, 
culinary, automotive, business and personal finance. A number of courses have state approval for 
professional and trade license preparation. 

Business Office The Department of Revenue has certified the amount in our unencumbered excess and 
deficiency funds available July 1, 2007 at $640,184. Per MGL Chapter 71, Section 16B Vi, $170,039 will 
be used to reduce the fiscal year 2008 community assessments. The reduction will be allocated based on the 
October 1, 2006 student enrollment. Approximately half of the fiinds to be returned are from the Medicaid 
Revolving Fund that was closed out as of June 30, 2007 per MGL Chapter 44 Section 72. 

Funding Issues The Fiscal 2009 Budget preparation is currently in process and will be presented to the 
District's Finance «fe Property Policy Sub-Committee in February and subsequently to the District's 
School Committee. At this point, we have not received any financial data pertaining to fiscal 2009 from 
the Department of Education. 

Financial Issues The District's fiscal year 2008 Federal Entitlement and Allocation Grants have been 
cut by 18%. The largest grant affected is the Perkins-Occupational Education Vocational Skills grant 
which was cut by $81,101. We will forego funding some instructional material and equipment, a part 
time position that supported our instructional staff with the Riso Graph's Data Solutions Analysis 
Software and fund a lease commitment from oiir operating budget. 



January 2001 - December 2007 



119 



5 



North Shore Regional Vocational School District Committee 



Beverly 

Boxford 

Danvers 

Essex 

Gloucester 

Hamilton 

Lynnfield 

Manchester-by-the-Sea 

Marblehead 

Middleton 

Nahant 

Rockport 

Salem 

Swampscott 

TopsjQeld 

Wenham 



Mr. Dean Porteous 

Mr. Michael Crowe 

Mr. Russell Fravel 

Mr. George R. Harvey, Chairman 

Mr. Joseph Parisi, EI 

Mr. David W. Ketcham 

Dr. Paul Anderson 

Mr. Joseph Sabella 

Mrs. Marcia Sweeney, Vice Chairman 
Mrs. Ellen Weitzler 
Mrs. Anne Senk 

Mr. Thomas St. Pierre 
Mr. William Jackson 

Mr. William O. Nichols, Secretary 



January 2007 - December 2001 

120 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Peter C. McCarriston 
David S. Van Dam 
Debbie Friedlander 
Elise Van Zoest 
Russ Patten 
Nancy A. Lord, Ex-Officio 

PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 

Nancy A. Lord, Personnel l\/lanager 
Helen M. Kennedy, Assistant Personnel Manager 

The Personnel Department continues in its practice of monitoring personnel policies and 
procedures to ensure fair and consistent employment practices for all Town employees and to maintain a 
safe, working environment that is free from harassment and discrimination. 

The Personnel Department continues to assist management with the interpretation of the various 
collective bargaining agreements and the Personnel Policy Governing Compensation & Employment 
Benefits, which covers those employees who are exempt from a collective bargaining agreement. The 
department is responsible for maintaining attendance records to ensure proper use of sick, vacation, 
personal, FMLA and other leave time in accordance with the various contracts and the Personnel Policy. 

Over the past year, the Personnel Department has assisted in the hiring process for several new 
employees, including both the Director an Co-Director of the Council on Aging, Local Building Inspector, 
Assistant Engineer and the Town's first Planner/Conservation Agent as well as the hiring of approximately 
70 temporary, seasonal summer employees for both the Department of Public Works and the Recreation 
Department. The Assistant Personnel manager researched the Town Planner Conservation Agent 
position as well as the Council on Aging Director position to develop sound position descriptions for both 
positions prior to advertising those positions. 

The Personnel Department re-certified for CORI certification under the Criminal History Systems 
Board and continues the CORI certification process for all Town volunteers who may work with a 
vulnerable population and all newly hired employees who are not exempt form this process. 

Under the direction of the Town Administrator, the Personnel Manager prepared the Request for 
Proposal (RFP) to upgrade the Town's Government Access Channel Equipment for the second floor of 
the Administration Building as well as the Public Library. Univisions Crimson Group was selected for the 
project. The project is currently underway and appears to be moving along. 

The Personnel Manager continues to conduct monthly Labor Management meetings in 
accordance with the Library and DPW union contracts. The Personnel Department also initiated monthly 
labor management meetings with the Clerical Union. Although this is not required by the Clericals Unit 
contract, it has proven to provide a healthy dialogue amongst management and the clerical staff. The 
Personnel Manager continues to hear any grievances filed by the Clerical Union, DPW Union, Library 
Union and/or Management at the Step 2 level to try and solve disputes relative to contract language 
interpretation. 

The membership of the Personnel Board changed when Elise Van Zoest resigned and moved to 
Utah. Ms. Van Zoest was replaced on the Board with Russ Patten, Town Clerk. The Personnel Board 
met with the Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor, prior to the Annual Town Meeting and approved 
some minor modifications to the Personnel Policy Governing Compensation and Employment Benefits. 
The standard articles relative to job classification and salary plan were sponsored by the Personnel Board 
and submitted in the warrant for Town Meeting approval. 

The Personnel Department would like to express its appreciation to the Personnel Board 
members, the Town Administrator, Andrew Maylor and the Department Heads for their continued support. 
We would also like to extend best wishes to Elise Van Zoest and her family out in Utah. We will miss her. 



Sincerely, 



Nancy Lord 
Personnel Manager 



121 



PLANNING BOARD REPORT 



The Planning Board held thirteen meetings during the year fronn July 1, 2006 through June 30, 
2007 to review and to provide approval action on various plans submitted to it under the Massachusetts 
Subdivision Control Law, and on site plans submitted to it in accordance with Swampscott Town By- 
Laws. Discussions were held with Swampscott residents, developers, contractors, architects and 
engineers regarding these matters to provide guidance and to assure compliance with Town By-Laws 
and regulations. The Planning Board also routinely consults with other town departments and officials, 
including the Inspector of Buildings, the Department of Public Works, the Fire Department and the Police 
Department, to ensure that proposed developments will ensure the safety and well being of Swampscott 
residents. 

Approval action was taken on a total of 26 subdivision and site plan review applications after 
board members had made site inspections and received opinions from abutting neighbors and other 
town residents. The board approved 18 additions to existing residences and three new homes. Site 
plan approval was granted for four commercial projects, including Uno's Chicago Bar and Grill. The 
Planning Board also approved the site plan for the renovations at Town Hall, discussed several potential 
road extensions, and reviewed several subdivision projects. 

The Planning Board also was able to work with both the Bertram House and the JRC to improve the 
landscaping on their respective parking lots, making both significantly more attractive properties on two 
of our main streets. 

Planning Board member, Jill Sullivan, was appointed by the Planning Board to be part of the 
interview team to hire a Town Planner and Conservation Agent, a position approved at the May 2006 
Town Meeting. Andrew Schreyer was hired to the position of Town Planner and Conservation Agent in 
December, 2006. Mr. Schreyer worked diligently with the Planning Board to rework the procedures and 
application materials required by applicants which resulted in a new set of application manuals which are 
posted on line on the Town website. Applicants for site plan review or subdivision control now have a 
clear understanding of the materials required and, therefore, site plan approvals are obtained more 
quickly and efficiently than in the past Furthermore, our bylaws require various departments to review 
certain types of projects to ensure safety and consistency with town infrastructure. This had been 
happening sporadically before the Town Planner's arrival, and is now strictly observed. Proper review 
by all relevant town agencies ensures better development and avoids problems in the future. 

The Planning Board wishes to express its appreciation to other town boards and officials for their 
cooperation in helping to promote the town's interests and welfare. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Eugene Barden, Chairman 
John Phelan, Vice-Chairman 
Jill Sullivan, Clerk 
Jeffrey Blonder 
Bruce Paradise 



122 



SWAMPSCOTT POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Mission Statement 

The Swampscott Police Department is a community-oriented police department, committed to providing 
professional service to all with fairness, compassion and respect, regardless of religion, age, race, color, 
creed, nationality or lifestyle. Working in concert with the community we endeavor to prevent crime, 
protect life and property and preserve the peace, order and safety in Swampscott. We nurture public trust 
by holding ourselves to the highest standards of performance and ethics. 

Fiscal Year 2007 

2007 was the 125'^ anniversary of the Permanent Organization of the Swampscott Police Department. 
The Police Department was formally organized on August 22"^ 1882. Although earlier references in 
official Town documents refer to the "Police Department" prior to 1882 it seems that this department 
consisted of a few constables who were called upon as needed. In recognition. Officers were issued a 
commemorative badge, based upon an early historic design, which was worn by officers while on duty. 

Throughout the year members of the Swampscott Police Department worked to prevent crime and 
disorder and to protect life and property by presenting a visible police presence throughout the Town and 
by responding rapidly, and professionally when called upon. 

The Temple Use Study Committee 

The Temple Use Study Committee, created by a vote of Town Meeting, recommended that a portion of 
the Town owned former Temple Israel property be renovated for use as a police facility 

Military Funerals 

The Police Department had primary responsibility for managing the logistics and security for two large 
funerals for a serviceman and servicewoman killed in the Iraq War. These events required mutual aid 
from a number of local and state law enforcement agencies and coordinating the actions of those 
agencies as well as military and funeral personnel. 

Dedication of police memorial 

The Swampscott Police Relief Association membership, past and present, erected and dedicated a 
monument in the swampscott Cemetery to departed Swampscott Officers who served the Town 
honorably. 

STARRS Proa ram 

With a grant from The Northeast Homeland Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC) the School 
Threat Assessment and Response Systems (STARS) project produced copies of floor plans of all of our 
schools, digital photos of all entrances and exits, Pictometry imagery, emergency contact information 
outside and inside the schools, including police, fire and EMS all of which was combined into binders 
specific to each school. These binders enhance our ability to respond to a threat or incident at our 
schools 

Shannon Gang Grant 

The Swampscott Police collaborated with other police departments to form the Southern Essex Coalition 
in order to look at regional issues such as youth crime and gangs. Together, with the Metropolitan Area 
Planning Commission, we received a grant, which funded the formation of a regional gang unit comprised 
of officers from each of the represented communities. Assigned officers conducted regular initiatives in 
each community designed to gather intelligence and target gang activity. Representatives from each 
community met on a regular bases to share information and experiences. 

Donated or Grant funded equipment Purchases 

A Ford dealership donated a one year lease of a 2008 Ford Taurus to the Department at no cost. This 
has allowed an unmarked cruiser to be deployed on patrol for the purpose of detecting criminal activity. 



123 



We received a grant of a Canon camera system, camcorder, printer and scanner from the Center for 
Missing and Exploited Children. We received four cell phones with service, a Lap top computer and PDA 
from a grant as part of our association with the N.S. Drug Task Force. Action Ambulance donated 4 AED 
defibrillators to the Department. The value of these was approximately $8,000. 

Community Policing 

The Swampscott Police Department has adopted as a philosophy the principles of Community Policing. 
Community Policing redefines the police mission to focus on solving problems rather than simply 
responding to calls for service. It requires that in addition to responding to individual incidents, we 
examine series of calls to determine if a problem exists. The Police Department has worked to achieve 
relationships with a variety of public agencies, community organizations and citizens to allow us to work 
together to develop strategies to solve many of the problems that affect the safety and quality of life in 
Swampscott. The objective of Community Policing is to increase the ability of the citizens of Swampscott 
to reduce the opportunities for crime and disorder to occur in our community. 

In Fiscal Year 07 the Police Department conducted a variety of community programs supported by a 
$47,000 grant from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety. During the period covered by 
this report Community Policing funds were used for programs involving the Bike Patrol Unit, the School 
Resource Officers and the Traffic Unit. Officers were able to participate in many youth events, providing 
opportunities for officers and the children in Town to interact in positive ways. The Police Department and 
the Fire Department hosted a Public Safety Day event, which was well attended by the public. 

Elder Outreach 

In Swampscott there is a growing population of elders who desire to live independently but often fail to 
take advantage of available assistance. We recognize that the Police are uniquely positioned to identify 
people in need in the community and that it is vital that we refer those people to community resources. 

In FY07 Sergeant John Behen and Officer Sal Caruso were assigned to work with the Swampscott 
Council on Aging. Together elders who have contact with the Police and find themselves in need of 
certain types of assistance will not feel alone in trying to solve their problems. These officers also 
conducted several safety and fraud education programs for elders at the Senior Center during the year in 
cooperation with the Swampscott Council on Aging. Officers met monthly with representatives of the 
Counsel on Aging, The Board of Selectmen, The Sheriffs Department, Greater Lynn Senior Services 
(GLSS) and the community to identify the needs of elders. 

In FY07 the police department continued to partner with the Nahant Police Department to provide the 
services of the "Are You O K" system for elders who are living alone and are at risk of becoming injured 
and unable to summon help. The "Are You OK" system, located In Nahant Police station, automatically 
dials the home telephones of enrolled Swampscott residents at a predetermined time every day. If the 
resident falls to answer the phone a Swampscott Police Officer is dispatched to the home to check on 
their well being. In FY 07 officers responded to 40 "Are You OK" checks, 41 Assist the Elderly calls and 
116 Well Being Checks. 

Bike Patrol Unit 

With grant funds the Police Department maintained the Bike Patrol Unit. The Unit is supervised by 
Sergeant Tim Cassidy and staffed by officers who have been trained to use mountain bikes on patrol. 
The bike officers patrolled areas in the Town that are not easily accessible to traditional methods of patrol 
and were used in our continuing effort to address problems of under age drinking and vandalism at night 
in the Town's parks and beaches. Additionally the bike officers were used to patrol many events such as 
the Town's fireworks display, parades, outdoor concerts and road races. Mountain bike officers have 
proven to be generally more approachable than officers patrolling In police cars and enjoy opportunities to 
interact more frequently and in positive ways with the public. 



124 



D.A.R.E. Drug Abuse Resistance Education 

We continued the D.A.R.E. program, using a combination of Police Department and Scliool Department 
funds. It is apparent that the community values this program and that it is appreciated and welcomed by 
the students and their parents. 

Twenty Swampscott students went to the District Attorney's summer camp sponsored by the Police 
Department. The camp was attended by about three hundred students from area communities and is 
coordinated by the Essex County District Attorneys Office. 

School Resource Officer 

The Swampscott Police Department in collaboration with the school community is committed to ensuring 
that all students receive an education in a safe environment free from harassment or threat of crime. 

Detective Rose Cheever was assigned full time as the school officer. Detective Cheever works to promote 
a positive relationship with the school community and provide opportunities for interaction between police 
and students. The officer's presence acts as a deterrent to crime and provides a degree of security and 
safety for the school's students, faculty, and visitors. 

The School Resource Officer investigated criminal activity that occurred in or around all school properties 
and followed up on cases involving students that occurred outside of school as well, since many incidents 
carry over into the school setting. The Officer addressed issues such as aggressive bullying behavior by 
students and worked to promote teen conflict resolution. 

The School Officer worked closely with the Lynn Juvenile Probation Department to monitor juveniles on 
probation sharing information and conducting curfew checks. 

Funding for this position was subsidized by the School Department in recognition that the safety and 
security of the school environment is paramount. 

Traffic Division 

The Traffic Division worked with the community to identify and address needs and problems concerning 
vehicle traffic and parking. Persistent traffic related issues were fonwarded to Lieutenant Thomas 
Stephens and Lieutenant Gary Lord. 

Officers worked to address neighborhood complaints throughout the Town. Selective Enforcement Patrols 
were regularly assigned to various streets in Town with special attention given to speed, stop signal and 
stop sign violations as well as parking enforcement. 

The Traffic officer's duties included overseeing of the winter parking permitting and enforcement program 
as well as planning for matters that impact traffic such as road construction projects and special events 
like road races. 

Officers worked with the community and Town departments to solve traffic and parking related issues 
throughout the town. One such effort involved the study of commuting times along Lynn Shore Drive from 
the Rotary to Redington Street As a result of changes to the timing of the signal light and the installation 
of new equipment controlling the call for a green light on Redington, commuting time was dramatically 
improved during the evening hours. 

The Governors Highway Safety Commission funded multiple enforcement initiatives for the Department 
including " Click it or Ticket" and O.U.I, enforcement efforts. The grant also funded the purchase of 
$3,000 worth of traffic equipment. 

Detective Division 

The Detective Division is comprised of Detective Sergeant Timothy Cassidy and Detectives Ted Delano, 
Jim Schultz and Rose Cheever. 



125 



Many crimes that occur in Swampscott involve multiple jurisdictions and require that Detectives maintain 
a relationship with Federal, State and other local law enforcement agencies. The Detectives were 
responsible for initiating or following up 377 investigations that ranged from annoying telephone calls and 
credit card offences to, drug dealing, threats, serious assaults, sex offences, burglaries, and robberies. 
Detectives conducted several undercover drug investigations along with area police departments, the 
D.E.A. and the Essex County and North Shore Drug task force. Officers worked to solve a number of 
serious crimes in Town such as robberies, including a gas station robbery where the attendant was 
stabbed, incidents of breaking and entering and two cases involving major drug sales resulting in the 
seizure of a large quantity of drugs and $70,000 cash. 

Family Services Officer 

Detective Delano was assigned as the Family Services Officer. He monitored the status of 1 06 209-A 
Restraining Orders involving individuals in Swampscott. He maintained contact with victims, followed the 
progress of domestic court cases and ensured that the Patrol Division was informed of situations where 
the victim might be at particular risk. During this period the Department filed 27 51 -A child abuse reports 
with the Department of Social Services. 

Animal Control Officer 

Officer Rich Cassidy was assigned as the Animal Control Officer. Officer Cassidy is a sworn officer of the 
Department who responds to animal related complaints in addition to his regular duties. There were 333 
animal related calls in FY07. 

Motorcycle Unit 

The Department's Motorcycle unit includes Lieutenant Paul Bartram as the officer in charge, with Officers 
Michael Bowden, Sal Caruso and Brian Wilson as riders on two police Harley Davidson motorcycles. All 
riders were required to attend a rigorous weeklong training program prior to assignment. 

Honor Guard 

Sergeant Jay Locke is the officer in charge of the Honor Guard. The Honor Guard is made up of officers 
who volunteer to represent the Department under a variety of circumstances. In fy07 the Honor Guard 
represented the Swampscott Police Department at occasions such as military funerals and Memorial Day 
and Veteran's Day services. In addition to Sgt. Locke, Honor Guard members are Steven Luck, Michael 
Frayler, Thomas Lucas, Todd Pierce, Brian Wilson and Brendan Reen 

Criminal Justice Information System 

Officer Matt MacDonald served as a member of the CJIS (Criminal Justice Information System) working 
group on the APB (Advisory Policy Board). The APB advises the state and federal government relative to 
the future direction of CJIS. The APB has 21 members from all aspects of Law Enforcement throughout 
the state. 

Individual Officer Recognition and Awards 

A number of officers were recognized for exemplary conduct through letters of recognition or 
commendation: 

Sergeant Jonathan Locke and Officer Michael Bowden for Life Saving; for resuscitating a heart attack 
victim 

Sergeant Timothy Cassidy awarded the Meritorious Service medal; for his willingness to involve himself, 
while off duty, in two armed robberies and two break ins which resulted in arrests 
The Detective Unit was recognized by the Chief of Police for two multi agency drug investigations and an 
interstate child pornography investigation. 

The First Division received a Group Citation from the Chief of Police for it's concerted efforts to target 
overnight car break-ins on that shift. 

Detective Jim Schultz and Sergeant Joseph Kable commended by the Chief of Police for their action in 
response to a homicide in progress call. 



126 



Emergency Medical Training 

During this period training was provided to officers in CPR, First Responder and AED (Automated 
External Defibrillator). Additional training was provided so that officers may use the AED defibrillator units 
for pediatric patients. Medical training allowed officers to maintain their mandated certification in each of 
these categories. 

As our Medical Office Lieutenant Jeanne Butler, organized or conducted much of the training and serves 
as liaison to the local ambulance service provider and is our state mandated Designated Infection Control 
Officer. She is also a member of the Metro Boston Critical Incident Stress Management team. 

Diversity training 

We conducted a cultural diversity workshop for all officers with an outside facilitator. The workshop 
encouraged officers to understand personal biases and perceptions of other cultures in an order to avoid 
those influences in the course of their duties. 

Firearms and Use of Force Training 

Officers are equipped and trained with weapons that provide them with an array of options with respect to 
use of force. 

In FY07 we replaced outdated handguns with new Smith & Wesson M&P sidearms and trained all officers 
with the weapon. Officers expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the firearm with many experiencing 
improved qualification scores as a result. 

Under the direction of firearms instructors Officer John Dube and Detective Jim Schultz, Officers attended 
two days of firearms and less lethal weapons training in addition to transition training. AR-15 patrol rifles 
were deployed in cruisers following an extensive training program. Shotguns were converted for use as 
less-lethal weapons for delivery of specially designed impact rounds. Officers reviewed the Department 
Use of Force Policy during training. 

In-Service Training 

Annual in-service training was conducted for all officers at the Reading Police Academy. Training focused 
on changes to the laws and new court decisions, domestic violence, and exploited children. 
Throughout the year the Department conducted additional "in house" training. 

Officers were recertified in the use of the Intoxilizer breath alcohol analyzer unit. 

Department Statistics- FY 2007 

Some of the offenses reported during this period included: 

• 9 Robberies 

• 49 House or building breaking & entering 

• 188 Vehicle break-ins 

• 19 Motor vehicles stolen. 9 stolen vehicles recovered in Town 

• 323 larceny related offences 

• 1 20 Domestic disputes 

• 2 Reported rapes 

• 1 Indecent assault and battery 

• 46 Drug offences 

• 64 Assaults and assault & batteries 

The Police Department responded to 447 motor vehicle accidents 

Officers made 239 arrests in FY07. There were an additional 310 criminal complaints filed in which 
persons were summonsed to appear in court. Summonsing is most often done as an alternative to arrest 
or as a result of a follow-up investigation. 



127 



New class codes were created to record incidents of identity theft and drug overdoses. There were 24 
reported incidents of identity theft logged and 4 drug overdoses. 



1669 citations, were issued consisting of 2,677 charges. Fines totaling $41,130 were written for civil 
violations alone. The court levies fines for criminal violations and arrests, a portion of which are shared 
with the Town. That amount is not readily available for this report. 

Violations included: 

• 779 Speeding offenses 

• 141 Criminal drivers license offences. 

• 140 Criminal vehicle registration offences 

• 552 Red light and stop sign offences 

• 40 Incidents of operating negligently or to endanger. 

• 45 Arrests for operating under the influence of liquor 

• 3 Operating under the influence of drugs. 

Officers issued 2.376 parking tickets with a total fine amount of $59.928.00 



909 


All night parking 


662 


Restricted place 


165 


Overtime parking 


12 


Wheels over 12 inches from curb 


190 


Wrong direction parking 


65 


Parking on sidewalk 


25 


Within 10 feet of hydrant 


35 


Obstructing a driveway 


14 


Within 20 feet of an intersection 


22 


Parking on a crosswalk 


96 


Fire lane 


16 


Blocking private way/fire apparatus 


16 


Impeding snow removal 


53 


Handicapped parking 


77 


Other /Unknown offense 



Incident Type 


Total 




Incident Type 




Assist the elderly 


41 




Open and Gross Lewdhe^^ 


2 


Are you OK check 


40 




Parking Complaint r 


278 


Attempted B&E 


1 




Power Failure 


13 


Accident under $1000 


181 




Protective Custody ;> 'S-'^J- 


. .... 4 


Accident Over $1000 


125 




911 Hang Up 


257 


Accident with personal injury 


35 




Recovered Property 


33 


Accident Hit & Run MV 


94 




Recovered Stolen Vehicle 


9 


Accident Hit & Run MV w/injury 


1 




Rape , 


.^M: 2 


Accidents/Pedestrian 


10 




Robbery 


" V 9 


Alarm 


1096 




Stolen License Plate . . 


9 


Annoying Phone Calls 


32 




Stolen Motor Vehicle ; f ^ 


19 


Assist Fire Department 


20 




Service Call ;..:^^-/ 


298 


Assault 


21 




Serve Court Papers ^^lT:xi..:l 


162 


Assault & Battery 


43 




Shoplifting 


39 


Assist other Police Depts. 


109 




Sudden Death ' 


6 



Break & Entering 


49 




Suicide/ Attempt . c i^,^ 




B&E Motor Vehicle 


188 




Suspicious Motor Vehicte- 


136 


Building Check 


4633 




Suspicious Act . ^ , . 


546 


Bomb Threat 


1 




Threats J I_ 4*^: : 


39 


Civil Matter 


82 




Towed Motor Vehicle ' C.^^^^. 


27 


Complaint 


296 




Tree Limb Down , 




Disturbance 


154 




Traffic Control/investigatib'h j „ 




Domestic Dispute 


120 




Trespassing . ^ 


8 


DPW Notification 


74 




Truants 


17 


Drug Offense 


46 




Vandalism , i^r^.U. 


153 


Erratic Operation 


67 




Violating 209A , , , . 


13 


Fire Alarm 


50 




Warrant Arrest i^J . „4 . J 


56 


Forgery 


7 




Wire Down , ^-1..^^- 


32 


Found Property 


88 




Youth Loitering . •*" 


' 58 


Fireworks Complaint 


46 




Noisy Group Inside . : i /.i; 


^^Wt-- 2 


Fire 


48 




Noisy Group Outside ' ^ ^ 


63 


Hate Crime 







Skate board/Rollerblade 


4 


Hazardous Conditions 


127 




Youth Drinking Indoors 


4 


Indecent Assault & Battery 


1 




Youth Drinking Outdoors j?"^ i= • 


9 


Identity Theft 


24 




Youth Disturbance ^i^^^BM^^. 


61 


Larceny 


246 




— ' — ■ J ' 'i 

Youth Trespassing .-i=iIuifA%',- 


16 


Liquor Offense 


8 




Youth Vandalism/Graffiti j;^ 


10 


Lockout 


36 




Motor Vehicle fatality ^ 


1, 


Lost Property 


75 




Well Being Checks :^ l_ 


116 


Loud Music/Party 


86 




Child Abuse 1 £.M 


4 


Medical Aid 


797 




Neighbor Dispute jl^^ 


18 


Missing Person 


8 




Arson 




Disabled Motor Vehicle 


69 








Motor Vehicle Stop 


1993 




OUI Liquor 


45 


Refuse to stop for police officer 


6 




OUI Drugs l^/id:^^. 


3 


Notification 


88 




Liquor Offence under 21 ~ «i 


47 


Open DoorA/Vindow 


82 




Receiving Stolen Property 


5 


Missing Juvenile 


12 




Drug Overdose 


4 


Dog Bite 


2 




Blasting Complaint T ^ ^r^J 


3 


Loose/Stray Dog 


35 




Firearms Violation 


2 


Animal Complaint 


296 




Dangerous Weapon 


1 








Resisting Arrest L'L,-:Jv.. 


12 












Total Log Entries FY 07 Entries (Not 
all are listed) 


14,775 




-Tit, 















Registered Sex Offenders 

At this writing there we have two registered Level 2 Sex Offenders that live in Town. There are three 
registered Level 2 Sex Offenders that work in Swampscott. There are no registered Level 3 Sex 
Offenders either living or working in town. 



129 



A Level 3 classification represents the most serious of offenders. Level 3 offender's photographs are 
posted in several public places Including the Police Station, the Library and Town Hall. 

Internal Affairs 

Captain John Alex is assigned as the Department's Internal Affairs officer. The primary responsibility of 
the Internal Affairs function is to respond to allegations of misconduct against the police department and 
its employees. Captain Alex is responsible for recording, registering, and controlling the investigation of 
complaints against employees. Additionally the Police Department continuously inspects and reviews 
officer conduct internally. 

A relationship of trust and confidence between the employees of this police department and the citizens 
of the community is essential to the successful accomplishment of law enforcement objectives. We are 
committed to investigate all complaints against the department or a member of the department, 
regardless of the source of such complaints, through a regulated, fair, and impartial Internal Affairs 
Program. 

Procedure for making a citizens complaint 

Citizens are encouraged to file a standard complaint report form, which is used to record all complaints of 
misconduct, mistreatment, or unethical practices against the police department. However, a verbal 
complaint may be lodged as well. Citizens may make complaints in person at the station or by telephone 
or mail. All complaints will be investigated promptly. 

In some cases a complaint can be resolved to the complainant's satisfaction at the time by the shift 
supervisor or officer-in-charge of the station. Immediate resolution can often be accomplished if the 
incident is clearly not of a serious nature, or arises from a misunderstanding or lack of knowledge of the 
law or of the limitation of a police officer's authority 

Any Internal Affairs investigation must be commenced immediately upon receipt of the complaint and 
must be completed within thirty (30) days. 

Every person who has filed a complaint against an employee shall be notified of the results of the 
investigation. 

In fiscal year 2007 three civilian complaints were filed. All were investigated and determined to be 
unfounded as the officer's actions were deemed to be in compliance with law and/or in accordance with 
department policy and procedure. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Ronald J. Madigan 
Chief of Police 



130 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



For the second consecutive year the Town received substantially less snow than the 
previous winter. However, it remained a taxing season on both the Department of Public Works 
employees as well as the budget. There were no fewer than fourteen sanding/salting operations 
which in itself exhausted the entire snow removal budget. There were two minor sow falls that 
required plowing; one on February 14 and the other on March 16. The sixteen-man work force 
should be commended for their dedication to assuring that the Town streets were as safe as 
humanly possible. Once again, a job well done! 

On July 17, the Department hired Victoria Mario to fill the vacant Assistant Engineer 
position. Upon her hiring, Ms. Mario became the first female assistant Engineer in the history of 
the Town of Swampscott, and has been an asset since the first day of her employment. The total 
number of DPW employees' remains at seventeen. The labor force as it currently stands 
continues to serve the Town well with its limited manpower. Once again, to supplement the 
limited work force the Department, with the assistance of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Trial Court Office, utilizes the Community Service Program to help maintain cleanliness around 
the Town. The Community Service Program was instrumental this past year in assisting the Town 
with its temporary move from the existing Town Hall to the former Temple Israel building, while 
the Town Hall under went renovations. The Department continues to work cooperatively with 
other Boards, Committees, Commissions, Town Departments and residents, and would like to 
thank them for all their shared cooperation during the past year. 

For the sixteenth year, the Department was a recipient of the "Tree City USA" award. 
Through general funding the Department was able to plant close to thirty trees at various 
locations around the Town, and is committed to planting more trees in the coming years, as well 
as, maintaining our existing trees. Unfortunately, the Department had to take down close to the 
same amount of trees due to them either being diseased or dead. This year, our own crew took 
down the trees with the assistance of a rented 55-foot aerial bucket truck. In the past, this task 
was contracted out, but by doing it in-house the Town was able to remove and prune more trees 
that were presenting a danger to the community. The Department, with the support of the Capital 
Improvement Committee, was finally able to secure funding to purchase an aerial bucket truck of 
its own. This truck should join the Department's fleet sometime in early 2008. 

The Department continues to take advantage of the Massachusetts Water Resource 
Authority's (MWRA) Local Pipeline Assistance Program to continue improving the Town's water 
main infrastructure. With this interest free loan, the Town was able to re-line the eight inch water 
main on Humphrey Street, from Marshall Street to Orchard Circle. Also with the assistance of the 
MWRA loan, the Department was able to install five new gate valves on the sixteen inch water 
main on Paradise Road. The Town is now provided with the added benefit of being able to isolate 
water main breaks without having to shut off the Town's entire water supply. With the completion 
of the Water Meter Replacement Project the Town has now converted to quarterly billing. 
Domestic water meters are now read in during the first weeks of February, May, August, and 
November. The quarterly billing cycle has resulted in additional revenue to the Town, as well as 
providing the residents with a more palatable bill for their budget. Also in February, again with the 
assistance of the MWRA, the Town conducted a water leak detection survey, and was able to 
discover three minor leaks totaling close to 100,000 gallons per day. The Water Division was 
quite busy over the course of the year, not only repairing these detected leaks, but also six other 
service leaks, as well as eight water main breaks. Naturally, six of the eight water main breaks 
occurred during the over night hours. The Water Division continues to be responsible for bi- 
monthly water samples that ensure that the water quality is safe for consumption for the residents 
of the Town of Swampscott. The Town also undergoes semi-annual testing for both lead and 
copper, which is also monitored by the MWRA. This past year, as in previous years, tests have 
consistently shown no indications of any health hazards associated with the Town's potable water 
supply. The Water Division was also responsible for the winterization of the 450 plus hydrants in 
Town. 

The Sewer Division re-built seven catch basins, cleaned approximately 150 storm drains, 
repaired two sewer main breaks, and re-laid the two fifteen inch drain lines on Marshall Street. 
The Sewer Division oversaw the complete rebuilding of the Windsor North lift station. This lift 



131 



station had been the source of many sewer back ups in the past, and had also cost the Town 
tens of thousands of dollars in corrective maintenance of the past four years. The Sewer Division 
worked closely with engineers, from Weston & Sampson, on the long overdue Sewer System 
Evaluation Study. This completed study, with the assistance of a low interest loan from the 
Department of Environmental Protection, will reduce the amount of inflow and infiltration into the 
Town's sewer system. This in turn will reduce the amount of flow that the Town sends to the Lynn 
for treatment. 

The Department continues to function successfully under an enterprise fund system for 
both sewer and water. Coinciding with the installation of the new water meters, the water fund 
continues to generate more revenue than it expended, this in turn created a surplus, which will in 
turn resulted in water rates being decreased. The sewer rates, on the other hand, increased 
slightly, as the sewer fund earned slightly more than was spent. The future goal of the 
Department remains to be able to fund capital projects through surplus funds. 

With the use of Chapter 90 aid from the Massachusetts Highway Department, some of 
which had accumulated through previous year's appropriations, the Department of Public Works 
was able to secure funding to pave several Town streets. Essex Street (from the Lynn line to the 
Essex Street Bridge), Essex Ave, Edgehill Road, The Greenway, Boulder Way, Hampden Street, 
Sherwood Road, and Paradise Road (from Burrill Street to Farragut Road) were all paved. 
Additionally, approximately 10,000 square feet of asphalt sidewalk were replaced town wide, and 
we are committed to continuing this yearly project to help provide safer conditions for pedestrians 
using the sidewalks in Swampscott. The Highway Division continues to maintain our parks and 
beaches, and is responsible for: street line painting, grass cutting, street sweeping, and litter 
control. Further, all eight baseball diamonds were completely refurbished by this group after many 
years of neglect. As part of a five year capital project, the Town has continued replacing its street 
signs with a customized nine inch sign with six inch letters and the Town seal attached. The 
Highway Division was also responsible for the placing over 100 ton of cold patch asphalt in the 
hundreds of potholes that developed over the winter months. 

The Cemetery Division was responsible for fifty-four interments and twenty-six 
cremations, as well as, the overall maintenance of over thirty acres of landscape. Additionally, the 
Cemetery Division plants close to 3300 flowers annually as part of the Swampscott Cemetery's 
perpetual care. 

The Department worked closely with the Massachusetts Emergency Management 
Agency to secure over $18,000 in reimbursement costs associated with the four day April 
nor'easter. The Department finally completed the demolition of the two abandoned brick 
buildings on the site of the former Wastewater Treatment Plant. Also long overdue, was the 
grading of the Phillips Park Parking Lot. This lot had become unusable, and with the assistance of 
Aggregate Industries the lot was graded with a reclaimed material and has become functional 
once again. 

The Department, with the donations form many generous residents of the Town of 
Swampscott, was responsible for the replacement of the park benches along both Kings and 
Fisherman's Beaches. The memorial benches provide an aesthetic upgrade to the entrance of 
our beautiful seaside community. 

Finally, we would like to thank the office staff, which continues to provide ongoing 
dedication and services to the residents of the Town of Swampscott, and their effort is truly 
appreciated by both the Board and the Director of Public Works. With the continued transition 
from the antiquated water meter reading system to the current new electronic method, the office 
staff was inundated with inquiries/complaints and the staff was excruciatingly taxed, but handled 
themselves remarkably well. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lawrence F. Picariello, Chairman Gino A. Cresta Jr. 

Milton S. Fistel, Member Director of Public Works 

Robert Vernava, Member 



132 



Swampscott Contributory Retirement System 
July 1, 2006 to June 30, 2007 

Francis E. Delano, Jr., Elected, Chairman 
David Castellarin, Ex-Officio John F. Behen Jr. Elected 
John T. Kiely, Jr., Appointed Thonnas H. Driscoll, Jr., Esq., Appointed 
Richard P. DiPesa, Esq., Retirement Administrator 

Established in 1937, the Swampscott Contributory Retirement System is 
administered by a five-member Retirement Board and one full-time staff employee and 
one part-time employee. The Board is governed by Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws and by the Public Employee Retirement Administration Commission, a 
state agency that provides guidance and oversight for 106 Massachusetts Retirement 
Boards. Membership in the plan is mandatory immediately upon commencement of 
employment for all permanent employees. The plan is a contributory defined benefit 
plan covering all Town employees deemed eligible by the Retirement Board, with the 
exception of schoolteachers, who contribute to the Massachusetts Teachers' Retirement 
Board. 

The System provides for retirement allowance benefits up to a maximum of 80% 
of a member's highest three-year average annual rate of regular compensation. Benefit 
payments are based upon a member's age, length of creditable service, salary and 
group classification. Members become vested after ten years of service. For certain 
hazardous duty and public safety positions, maximum retirement is at age 65. A 
retirement allowance consists of an annuity, which represents members' accumulated 
total deductions including interest and a pension portion, which is funded by the Town. 
The average retirement benefit is 80-85% pension 15-20% annuity. Active members 
contribute either 5,7,8 or 9% of their gross regular compensation to the Retirement 
System, determined by the date upon which the employee enters the service of the 
town. Any member hired after January 1 , 1979 contributes an additional 2% on wages 
over $ 30,000.00. 

As mandated by law, the Retirement Board has a fiduciary responsibility to the 
members and retirees of the system and to properly invest the fund's assets, totaling 
$31 .2M. In order to properly invest the system's assets, the Retirement Board engages 
the service of an investment consultant, Segal Advisors and eight investment managers: 
Chase Investment Counsel (large cap equities), Invesco (international equities) and 
Wells Capital Management (fixed income securities). Independence Investments, LLC 
(small/mid-cap equities), Eaton Vance Management (large cap equities) and two real 
estate managers. Intercontinental Real Estate Corporation and American Realty 
Advisors. In addition, the Board hired Piper Jaffray as a fund of funds private equity 
manager. The Board also has an actuarial valuation performed every other year, the 
most recent being as of January 1 , 2006. According to the January 1 , 2006 valuation, 
the Retirement System is 52.5% funded vs. 54.3% as of January 1, 2004. The Unfunded 
Actuarial Accured Liability is $27.59M. The System will be fully funded by the year 2028. 
During the period July 1, 2006-June 30, 2007, there were no changes in the makeup of 
the Board Members. For the year 2006, the Contributory Retirement System earned 
1 1 .53% of a total return on investment. During the period July 1 , 2006-June 30, 2007 a 
total of four Members retired. In addition, during this period, the Retirement System 
mourned the passing of eight of our Retirees, or their surviving spouses. 

Respectfully submitted, Francis E. Delano, Jr., Chairman 



133 



mmmmmmmmmmm 



SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



Dr. Matthew H. Malone, Ph.D., Superintendent of Schools 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Shelley Sackett, Chairperson (7/06-4/07) 
David Whelan, Jr., Chairperson (4/07) 
Nell Bernstein, Ph.D. 
Paula Bonazzoll (left office 4/07) 

Joseph Crimmins 
Mary DeChillo (left office 4/07) 
Dan Yaeger 



SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 



High School 


Lawrence Murphy 


781 


596-8830 


Middle School 


Ralph Watson 


781 


596-8820 


Clarke School 


Carolyn Murphy 


781 


596-8812 


Hadley School 


Lois Longin 


781 


596-8847 


Machon School 


Kevin Cushman 


781 


596-8835 


Stanley School 


Pamela Angelakis 


781 


596-8837 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

SY06-07 was a very challenging year for the Swampscott Public Schools. The major 
challenges involved the school budget, which forced us to have to make very hard decisions that 
would impact the future organization and operations of the Swampscott Public Schools. As a result, 
the Machon Elementary School was closed and all elementary school school students were 
redistricted to the three remaining elementary school sites. The closing of Machon School also 
prompted the reassignment of all elementary school personnel and the moving of classrooms 
associated with this reassignment. The School Committee adopted a new student assignment policy 
using a floating attendance pattern in place of geographical boundary lines. In addition, the SPS 
eliminated a total of 32.5 full time equivalent positions. This includes classroom teachers, educational 
support professionals, and administrators. 

In addition to the budget crisis we also closed our Middle School building on Greenwood 
Avenue and moved the Middle School from Greenwood Avenue to Forest Avenue. This, coupled with 
the grand opening of the new Swampscott High School, created a three-tiered move that was 
accomplished masterfully by our maintenance, custodial and contracted moving personnel. 

The 06-07 school year forced us to closely examine the flaws of our budget, finance and 
business operations. As a result, a professional audit of business operations was performed that 
helped us address the structural flaws within our organization. These flaws were also made clear to 
us in the Special Education audit as well as the forensic audit that were also accomplished during the 
06-07 school year. Immediate action was taken to address these flaws and a Budget Director was 
hired. The Budget Director successfully built a line item budget workbook that displayed the entire 
funding picture of the Swampscott Public Schools. In addition, all business operations and personnel 
were redesigned and refocused on meeting the needs of the school system more efficiently and in line 
with the town's fiduciary and accounting protocols. Coupled with this, we were also able to develop 
and maintain a human resource/staffing database, which for the first time, allowed us to have updated 
and accurate human resource information on every employee in the Swampscott Public Schools. 
Furthermore, new accountability structures have been put in place by the Finance Subcommittee of 
the School Committee that have enabled us to provide a complete picture of our financial operations. 

Despite the challenges presented to us during the 06-07 school year, the Swampscott Public 
Schools made their annual yearly progress goals for the second year in a row. We continue to 
maintain a high level of student achievement on the MCAS state assessment system. Our elementary 
and middle school pass rates in English Language Arts and Mathematics continue to show growth 
each year although the 10*^ grade scores have seemed to plateau over the past three years. One of 



134 



the highlights of the 06-07 school year is that the fifth grade at Stanley School scored 5 out of 929 
fifth grade units across the state in English Language Arts. 

• SPS continues to outperform the state on MCAS. 

• Scores provide us with both positive affirmation of the work we are doing but also increases 
our concern levels in specific areas i.e., math / sci. 

• Scores indicate that we must do a better job of closing the achievement gap between both 
special education and low income students with all other students. 

• Concern for emerging pattern ("Whale Tail"), in which the # of students in advanced grows at 
the same time the # of students failing grows (two extremes). 

• Scores indicate further focus on curriculum / instruction in grades / content areas that have 
seen a plateau in results. 

• AYP indicates progress. 

A continued focus on teaching and learning and our investment in professional development will 
continue to drive all decisions in the Swampscott Public Schools. Our students are at the center of our 
work and our faculty and staff are the vehicle for realizing gains in student achievement. 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

• Closed the Machon Elementary School and the Swampscott Middle School at the end of the 
school year. 

• Many teachers moved to new classrooms/schools as a result of the school closings. 

• Hired a Budget Director in place of an Assistant Superintendent for Business and Finance. 

• Appointed a Grants Manager. 

• Organized central purchasing and distribution of copier and custodial supplies to be effective 
FY08. 

CLARKE SCHOOL 

School Improvement Plan Goals 

• To improve student reading comprehension, fluency, and test scores. 

• Clarke students will improve their written communication skills. 

• To improve student acquisition of mathematical concepts, mathematical fluency and test 
scores. 

• Instructional staff will collaborate to review and analyze student work in the curricular content 
areas. 

• The Clarke School will maintain and enhance a positive school climate. 
Activities 

Students at Clarke School went on various field trips: Smolak Farms, Lowell Mills, North 
Shore Music theater, Peabody Essex Museum, Children's Museum, Stuart Little. 
The Fifth Grade Leaders helped with recycling, office, lunch room, clean-up, and Toys for Local 
Children. 

Leslie Kiely, Physical Education Teacher, organized and ran a Recess Walking Club. 
The Annual Thanksgiving Feast for the entire school was sponsored by third grade students, parents 
and the PTA. It was a magnificent success and represented Clarke School's family spirit. In addition 
to the feast, the school community had a food and clothing drive to benefit My Brother's Table in Lynn 
and "The Inn Between" in Peabody. Many donations were received and delivered to the needy. This 
event helps children to reflect about what they are thankful for and the importance of helping others. 
The open house in January "Bring Your Family Back to School Night" was a fabulous display of 
children's accomplishments. In addition, families had a chance to visit all classrooms at Clarke and 
meet the staff. The Science Fair for grades 3-5 was held in May. Students, parents and staff were 
enlightened and impressed by the students' work. 

Clarke 5"" grade students participated in Student/Staff Switch Day in June. Each student took 
over for a staff member, under their direction, between 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. 



135 



In June, students in grades 4 & 5 received the Presidential Awards for Excellence and 
Achievement. Awards for excellence in the fine arts and physical education were presented. 
Also in June was the elementary advanced band concert held at the Middle School and the 5^ grade 
Moving On program that included a digital yearbook under the direction of Sarah Zam, library/media 
specialist. 

PTA Activities 

Halloween Party, Gift Wrap, Thanksgiving Feast, Book Fair, Holiday Fair, After School Program, Luau, 
Auction, Cow Plop, Box Tops, Beach Day, Poet in Residence, Teacher Wish List, Yard Sale and 
Keyboarding. 

Cultural Arts 

October - Ben Franklin; January - Art Quest; February - Abe Lincoln; March - Stuart Little; April - 
Ken Carrier/Science; May - Promise Land-Immigrant Diversity; June - Okaiko Japanese Drums. 

Hadley School 

School Improvement Plan Goals 

• To improve student reading comprehension, fluency and test scores. 

• To imp[rove student acquisition of mathematical concepts, mathematical fluency and test 
scores. 

• Hadley students will improve their written communication skills. 

• To maintain and repair the facility and enhance the appearance of Hadley School to reflect an 
atmosphere that is conducive to excellence in learning. 

Student Activities 

Student Council, Chorus, "Code of Behavior", Olmstead Area Historic Walking Tour, Curriculum Night, 
Brain Injury Program, Harvest Festival, Book Fair, Save the Children, D.A.R.E., Basketball, Recycling, 
Reading Buddies, K-Door Greeters, Grade Level Community Service, School Store, Halloween 
Parade, Enrichment Classes, Heritage Week, Literacy Celebration, Grade Level Student 
Performances, Donations to Council on Aging, Troops Overseas, Hadley Science Fair, Geography 
Bee, Battle of the Books, Spelling Bee, 100"" Day Celebration, Fun Field Day, Clean Up-Fall and 
Spring, Hadley Staff Calendar, many Student Council activities, Hadley Shine Committee, Decorations 
Committee, and T.L.C. 
PTA Activities 

Kindergarten Picnic, Halloween Haunt, Book Fair, Holiday Fair, Magazine Drive, Wrapping Paper 
Drive, Yearbook, PTA Domino Night, After School Programs, Teacher Wish List, Playground Fund, 
Volunteer Program, Hadley Gardening Club, Spring Clean-Up, Spring Arts Festival, Phone Pals, A+ 
America, Box Tops for Education, Hadley Shine Committee, S.A.I. L., Continental Math League, 
Hadley Herald, End of the Year Activities. 
Enrichment 

Bay Colony Educators, Native American Perspectives, Art Quest, Arabic Music, Dance & Culture, 
Painting with Words, Poet in Residence, Reading the Clouds, Family Ties, Symphony by the Sea, 
Martha Dana Puppeteer, Water Watch, Museum of Fine Arts, Museum of Science, Quarry and Iron 
Works, Audubon, Nahant Marine Biological Center, Addison Museum of American Art, and Discovery 
Museum. 

Stanley School 

School Theme 

Learning and Caring Count at Stanley continues to be our theme. Students continued to 
commit random acts of kindness and receive P.R.O. Awards (People Respecting Others). Many other 
organized community service activities were planned for student participation and fundraising. This 
year 202 students in Grades K-5 participated in the St. Jude Hospital Math-A-Thon and they raised 
$5129.35. Each student completed a Math Fun Book or CD with grade level appropriate problems 
and Collected Pledges from sponsors. 

Grade 5 Leaders continue to be role models who demonstrate leadership and service while 
developing personal attributes. Leaders assume various responsibilities over the course of the year. 
Grade 5 Leaders run a very successful Recycling Program, they pride themselves on collecting money 



136 



for TLC, they meet weekly with the principal to work on developing leadership skills, responsible 
behavior and exemplify belief that Taking One Small Action Can Make a Difference. 

Grade 5 Leaders raised $1690.89 plus several boxes of gifts were donated for TLC. Grade 5 
Leaders raised $200.00 with their Open House Bake Sale to purchase gift certificates for the 
Swampscott Senior Center Holiday Party. They also raised $300 on Pajama Day and the VFW 
matched this amount so with a total of $600 we purchased Phone Cards for the Troops overseas. 

PROGRAMS 

SPIRIT - Stanley Parents Inspire Reinforce Teach 
This program was started to organize parent volunteers for various activities. Volunteers can get 
involved in our school by either running before school programs, assisting in the Library, assisting with 
clerical tasks in office, etc. The SPIRIT squad has been an enhancement to our school community. 

Continental Math League - Grades 2-5 
Meets one morning a week 7:45am-8:15am with parent volunteers and teachers as coaches. 
Newspaper Club - Grades 2 - 5 

Meets one afternoon a week with parent volunteers as facilitators and editors of this club. 

Student Programs and Activities 
Curriculum Night, Open House and Book Fair, Geography Bee, Spelling Bee, D.E.A.R. Day, 
DARE Graduation, Portfolio Sharing for Parents, Various Authors' Teas, Battle of the Books, 
Book Swap, Kindergarten Halloween Parade, Kindergarten play. Grade 1 play, Grade 2 play 
Field Trips to Brooksby Farms, Peabody Essex Museum, Freedom Trail, Berklee Performance Center, 
Museum of Fine Arts, Museum of Science, Duck Tour, North Shore Music Theatre, Jordan's IMAX 
Theatre, Dunn Planetarium, Fisherman's Beach and Salem Orientation Center. Music Department 
concerts - Band, Strings, Chorus Faneuil Hall, Grade 3 Photography Exhibit, Grade 4 Power Point 
Presentations, National Grid - Electrical Program, Fox 25 Weather Program, Internet Safety Program, 
Orthodontist Program, P.E. Fitness Programs (Fiesta Fun and Fitness Walks), METCO Pot Luck, 
Grade 4 Graduation Picnic, In school Field Trips - Minori Ishikaw 
Grade Five Leader's Club Activities 

• Grade 5 Leaders place flags on Veteran's graves for Memorial Day 

• Highly successful recycling program 

• Fund raising for TLC 

• Fund raising for Troops Overseas 

• Volunteer Appreciation Tea 

• Open House Greeters/Bake Sale 
PTA Activities 

Harvest Fair, Talent Show, Book Fair, Holiday Fair, Movie Night, Bingo Night, Annual Fun-N-Field 
Day, Grounds Beautification Program, Highly successful After School Enrichment Programs, 
Walk-a-thon 

Cultural Arts/Enrichment Programs 
Dan Kripps - Native American Perspectives;Karin Doben - Art History and Appreciation Gr. 1-5; 
Museum of Science Adventures in Science Grades 3-5; Jill Stover - Author Gr. 1 ; Tae Kwon Do; 
Yoga; Discovery Museum; Boston Ballet; Katy Kelly - Author; Wilmore the Wizard; Historical 
Perspective - Abe Lincoln 

MIDDLE SCHOOL 

2006/07 School vear highlight 

• Introduction and transition for Ralph Watson- new Middle School Principal 

• Planning and Development of Grade 5 Pilot Program for the 2007/08 school year. Included 
Parent Feed-back forums and school visits 

• First Grade 8 Trip to Washington D.C. in June 2007 

• All teachers created Curriculum Maps, recording curriculums, State Standards covers, skills 
requirements and assessments. 

• June 2007- Middle School sponsored the first Curriculum Boot Camp for curriculum 
development in all major content areas. 15 tears were involved in this project. 



I 



137 



• Parent out-reach through creation of a new PTO and Parent ColTees with the Principal 
School Activities and Field Trip Highlights : 

• Monthly School Dances 

• Friday Night Basketball 

• Student Council- ran book drive for Children Hospital, Food Drive for My Brother's Table and 
other school wide events 

• Grade 8 Field Trip to One Act Plays- Boston, MA 

• Grade 6 Field Trip to Museum of Science 

• Grade 6 Field Trip- miniature golf connected to math, graphing and calculating 

• Grade 7 trip to North Shore Music Theatre for The Christmas Carol 

• Grade 7 Beach Clean up Project 

• Grade 7 Marine Biology Harbor Trip 

• Spring Musical - Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat 

• Grade 8 Washington Trip 

• Grade 8 Moving-on Ceremony 



138 



RECREATION DEPARTMENT 



MISSION STATEMENT 

The Recreation Department provides the community with leisure time activities for adults 
and children. This includes beaches and lifeguards, sailing lessons, tennis,track and field, 
basketball, soccer playground programs and a teen recreation center. In winter months we 
offer enrichment programs for both adults and children. We also provide beach and 
railroad stickers and collect field usage fees. 

The Recreation Department has been working closely with the schools, youth sports 
groups and the DPW to create a field utilization schedual and a Field use and maintanece 
program so that we may continue to use and maintain our new sports fields properly. 

Our Sailing Program continues to grow. We have added 4 New American Sailboats as 
well as a new engine for our Boston Whaler. Safety as well as developing life long sailers 
continues as our main goal for this program. We have added to our summer park 
programs Lacrosse, field hockey and have been working with the school department to 
upgrade the ropes course to prepare for a Project Adventure course. 

In the fall we sponsored our 2"^ Arts and Crafts Festival and added a music festival as 
well. 

We also started a Big Blue Hoops Basketball Program which consisted of over 200 kids 
in gradesK-4. 

Our Adult winter Programs continue to grow with classes in Knitting, Painting, Spanish 
CPR, Flower Arranging and our most popular program our Wine seminar. 

The Learn to Ski program for children in grades 4 and up that takes kids to Bradford after 
school on Wednesdays for 6 weeks was at capacity with 45 children. Our plan for next 
year will be to add a second bus which will enable us to take 85 children. 

The Recreation Department looks forward to adding new programs with input from the 
community each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Danielle Strauss 
Recreation Director 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

Maryellen Fletcher, Chairman Jack Hughes 
Brian Murphy Peter McNemey 

Cynthia Shannon Karen Donaher 

Patty Pederson 



I 



139 



Technology Department 



Fiscal 2007 was a busy year for the Technology Department. During this year, a new 
cable studio was created. New equipment was Installed and new cameras were run to the 
Selectmen's meeting room and to the 2"'' floor of the public library. Upgrading this equipment will 
allow more meetings to be taped and broadcast. 

Also during the fiscal year, the Town entered into a cable license with Verizon allowing 
residents to have a choice in cable, phone, and internet sen/ice. 

In March of 2007, the former Network Specialist resigned from his position. Due to 
budget constraints, the technology functions were placed under the direction of the 
Treasurer/Collector. 

In May 2007, fiber was run from the town hall to the former Temple Israel in preparation 
of moving the town offices there during renovations. In addition to the fiber being run, the former 
temple building was networked and electrical upgrades were performed. In June, the technology 
department moved all town hall pc's and equipment to the temporary town hall. All equipment 
had to be set up and tested. 

In Town Hall, we continued the process of updating all pc's to a uniform platform. Older 
machines were upgraded or replaced to increase efficiency and more network printers were 
added to replace desktop Inkjet printers. 

We look fonvard to fiscal year 2008 and moving back to the Elihu Thomson building. 



Respectfully Submitted 
Denise M. Dembkoski 
Treasurer/Collector/Network Specialist 



140 



OFFICE OF VETERANS' SERVICES 



The Office of Veterans' Services was established and is mandated by the IVIassachusetts 
Legislature under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 115. Veterans' Services is available to provide 
any and all assistance to veterans and their families and to assure that they receive all benefits that they 
may be entitled to. These benefits may be procured through the Massachusetts Department of Veterans 
Services, the United States Veterans Administration, the Social Security Administration and any other 
Governmental agency or private organization designed to provide assistance to our veterans and their 
families. All financial aid disbursements from this office through the Massachusetts Department of 
Veterans Services to needy veterans and their families are eligible for a 75% reimbursement from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts providing the proper monthly application for reimbursement has been 
made in a timely manner. A recent legislative bill eliminated the "wartime service" requirement, which 
virtually allows all veterans regardless of dates of service to be eligible for aid and assistance from the 
Massachusetts Department of Veterans Services. With a vast majority of our active duty, reserve and 
national guardsmen and women serving on active duty overseas in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, or 
Operation Enduring Freedom the numbers of veterans seeking assistance should rise accordingly. 
Currently one of the most sought after benefits is for Military Honors to be rendered at a veteran's funeral. 
It is estimated that Veterans are currently passing away at a rate of over 1000 a day in the United States, 
The local funeral homes are well prepared for the request for Military Honors, however, should a problem 
arise, many families seek assistance from this office to ensure their loved one receives the proper 
"Honors" to which they are entitled. 



VETERANS COUNCIL 

The Veterans Affairs Committee was disbanded and a "Veterans Council" for the Town of 
Swampscott was formed in the Fall of 2006. The Council is a 7 member b»oard comprised of the Towns 
Veteran Service Officer, as well as the Commanders and one appointee for each of the 3 Veteran 
Organizations that are based in Swampscott, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the American Legion, and the 
Marine Corps League. The Council is charged with maintaining a heightened state of awareness of our 
veterans and current active duty military personnel, through events and memorials. 



VETERANS DAY 

On 11 November 2006, family, friends and residents formed at 10:00 at the intersection of Essex 
St and Burrill St for the dedication of "SPC Jared J. Raymond Square" Jared Raymond was our Town's 
first casualty in the Global War on Terror and the Town's first combat loss in over 35 years. The 
dedication was officiated by Reverend Dean Pedersen and was well attended by numerous state and local 
officials, friends, residents, numerous veteran organizations, active duty military personnel as well as 
police and fire department personnel. The dedication ended with Reverend Petersen saying "We must 
never forget what we have done here" and a bagpipe rendition of "Going Home". Following the dedication 
of "Raymond Square" the annual observance of Veterans Day began at 1 1 :00. Color Guards representing 
the Swampscott Police and Fire Departments, the Swampscott VFW, American Legion and the Marine 
Corps League marched into place at Thompson Circle on Monument Avenue. Officiating the event was 
the Reverend Dean Pedersen of the First Church in Swampscott who reminded us that it is incumbent 
upon all of us to remember our veterans and the sacrifices they have made to ensure our freedoms and to 
always keep the memory of Jared Raymond alive. Attendees, who included members of the Board of 
Selectmen, The Town Administrator as well as other officials, honored and prayed for our servicemen 
and women who are curently serving in harms way and for the Raymond family. Following the service a 
rifle salute was fired followed by taps and a bagpipe rendition of Amazing Grace concluding the ceremony. 

Aq with Mpmnrial Daw thi« rArpmnnu is rtnpn tr» anu anrl all nf anv ano anH all ara anmi iranpH tn at+pnrl 



141 



MEMORIAL DAY 



As has been the tradition for several years, the Principal of the Stanley School, Ms. Pamela 
Angelakis, and several of the 5*^ grade teachers brought volunteers fronn Stanley School two weeks prior 
to Memorial Day to place U.S. flags on the graves of veterans at Swampscott Cemetery. Also assisting 
with this task in the days leading up to Memorial Day is the local troop of Boy Scouts, and volunteers from 
the various Veteran organizations here in town. These groups, along with several other volunteers, placed 
well over 1000 flags. Their desire to "remember" our veterans in this truly special way is heart warming 
and greatly appreciated. On Memorial Day, St. Johns the Baptist Church held it's annual 10:00 AM Mass 
followed by a wreath laying at the flagpole overlooking Swampscott harbor in the lot at St. Johns. The 
wreath laying serves as a reminder of, and is in honor of all those who have been lost at sea while serving 
their country. At 1 1 :00 family, friends and residents gathered at the intersection of Stetson Ave and Essex 
Street for the dedication of "Captain Jennifer J. Hams Square". Captain Harris was our community's 2"** 
combat casualty in less than 5 months. The dedication which was officiated by Reverend Dean Pedersen 
had numerous speakers and was well attended by many residents, members of the Armed Forces, boy 
scouts and the media. Speaker after speaker remembered Captain Harris for the unselfish hero that she 
was. Following the dedication of "Harris Square", those present reassembled at the Swampscott cemetery 
at 12:00 Noon. Color Guards representing the VFW, American Legion the Marine Corps League 
combined and along with the Swampscott Police Department served as "colors" representatives. The 
annual service was officiated by Reverend Dean Pedersen. The ceremony was well attended by many 
members of the Board of Selectmen, State Representative Douglas Petersen, State Senator Thomas 
McGee, Police Chief Ronald Madigan, as well as many other town officials and numerous town residents, 
including IstLt. Neal Clinton USMC, IstSgt. David Gustafsen USA, Sgt. Ross Thibodeau USA, SPC Justin 
Hines USA, Airman Reed Casper USAF and Lance Corporal Charies DiChirico USMC who laid 3 
wreaths, one in honor of Specialist Jared Raymond, one in honor of Captain Jennifer Harris and the 3"" 
wreath was placed in honor of all veterans past, present and future. A rifle salute was performed by 
members of the Marine Corps League, taps were sounded and a bagpipe performance concluded the 
ceremony. This ceremony is held every Memorial Day and is open to all and all are encouraged to attend. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Jim Schultz 

Veterans Service Officer 



142 



SWAMPSCOTT WAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Trustees 

^ ^ Joseph J. Balsama, Co-Chairman 

Duncan H. Maitland. Co-Chairman 
Jean F. Reardon, Secretary 
Thomas H. White, Jr., Douglas B. Maitland 
Barbara F. Eldridge 

Hugh M. Schultz 

General Information 

A $10,000 scholarship fund was established by vote of Town Meeting on March 28, 1950 as a 
perpetual memorial to those who served in the Military Service defending our freedom. The scholarship 
was awarded in 1951 for $250. In 1964, the Town Meeting appropriated an additional $10,000. Since 
that time, gifts have been received from numerous individuals and organizations in memory of loved 
relative and friends. To date 280 Swampscott High School students have been awarded scholarships 
totaling $108,850. 

Distributions of Funds 

Beginning with the class of 2005, the distribution of the War Memorial Scholarship amounts were 
divided as follows: $1,200, (The Ernest Manchin Memorial Scholarship); $1,000, $800, $700, $700. The 
total of $4,400 remained the same, but there were five awardees instead of six. ^ 

Details of changes In the fund balance 

Balance as of 7/1/05 $119,516.59 
Donations (7/1/05 - 6/30/06) $ 500.00 

Interest (7/1/05 - 6/30/06) $ 3,107.40 

TOTAL $123,123.99 

Scholarships awarded, July 1 . 2005 $ 4,400.00 

Balance, June 30. 2006 $1 18.723.99 

Five Scholarship totaling $4,400 were awarded in July 2005 as follows: 

$1,200 (Ernest Manchin Memorial Scholarship) Jordan Samiljan Bowdoin College 

$1,000 Jillian Sorgini Hofstra University 

$800 Elizabeth Howard Northeastern University 

%f^^ Stephanie Camerlengo Assumption College 

$700 Eric Shapiro Tufts University 

The trustees wish to thank everyone who made donations to the Swampscott War Memorial 
Scholarship Fund. Through your generosity, we are able to build up equity in the fund, thereby providing 
the opportunity for additional income from which the awards are granted. Each year a few Swampscott 
High School graduates, who continue on to higher education, will receive some financial assistance. 

HONOR ROLL OF CURRENT DONORS (July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006 

Sylvia Drais. Mr. & Mrs. Angelo Losano. Mr. & Mrs. Rocco J. Losano, Joseph Pinto, Ida S.Pinto, Mr. & Mrs. 
Frederick C. Tirabarsi, Wayfarer Lodge, A.F. & A.M. 



From July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006, donations were made by the Wayfarers Lodge, 
A.F. & A.M. In memory of: William Berkson, Frank L. Chesley. Ralston S. Clinch, Joseph M. Hines. 
and Gordon L. Ruddock 



From July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006, donations were made in memory of: William 
Berkson, Frank L. Chesley, Ralston S. Clinch, David J. Dandreo, Jr. Joseph M. Mines, Frank Losano, 
Frances Manchin, Mary & Ernest Manchin, Gordon L. Ruddock 



144 



THE TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 




2007 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING WARRANT 

Election Day, April 24, 2007 
Annual Town Meeting, May 7, 2007 



146 



2007 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING WARRANT 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 



Report of the Finance Committee 3 

Summary of Revenue and Expenditures 8 

WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Article 1 Elections 9 

Article 2 Reports of Town Boards and Conmiittees 1 1 

GENERAL ARTICLES 

Article 3 Petition the General Court, Tax Abatement 1 1 

Article 4 Accept MGL, Chap. 40, Sec. 8J 1 1 

Article 5 Accept MGL, Chap. 39, Sec. 23D 12 

Article 6 Resolution, Regional Dispatch 12 

Article 7 Petition the General Court, Town Meeting Size 12 

Article 8 Establish a Town Building Committee 12 

CAPITAL ARTICLES 

Article 9 Appropriation for Recommended Capital Projects 13 

Article 10 Accept Capital Projects Not Recommended 14 

Article 1 1 Appropriation for Chapter 90 Roadway Improvements 14 

Article 12 Appropriation for SRF Funded Sewer Improvement 15 

Article 13 Appropriation for MWRA Financed Water Improvements 15 

PERSONNEL ARTICLES 

Article 14 Amend the Personnel Bylaw, Classification and Salary 16 

Article 15 Amend the Personnel Bylaw, New Positions 16 

Article 16 Amend the Personnel Bylaw, Reclassifications 16 

Article 17 Authorize Collective Bargaining Agreements, Town 16 

Article 18 Authorize Collective Bargaining Agreements, School 17 

Article 19 Authorize Salaries of Elected Officials 17 

FINANCL\L ARTICLES 

Article 20 Approve Transfer of Previous Years Unexpended Balances 17 

Article 2 1 Approve "Capture" of FY07 Unexpended Funds 17 

Article 22 Approve Transfer of Surplus Revenue 18 

Article 23 Continue and Approve Council on Aging Revolving Account 18 

Article 24 Continue and Approve Blue Bins Revolving Account 18 

Article 25 Continue and Approve Recreation Revolving Account 19 

Article 26 Appropriation for Fiscal 2008 Budget 19 

Article 27 Approve Transfer of Assessor's Overlay Surplus 30 

Article 28 Approve Transfer of Water Enterprise Surplus Revenue 30 



1U7 



Article 29 Approve Transfer of Sewer Enterprise Surplus Revenue 30 

Article 30 Authorize Twenty-Five Year Lease of the Fish House 30 

Article 3 1 Accept MGL, Chap. 157, Sec. 2 of the Acts of 2005 3 1 

Article 32 Authorize Sale of Temple Israel Property 3 1 

Article 33 Authorize Sale of Greenwood Avenue Middle School 31 

Article 34 Closing Article - Omnibus Appropriation 3 1 



Appendix A Position Classification 33 

Appendix B FY 2006 Reserve Fund Transfers 37 

Appendix C Town Finance Terminology 38 

Appendix D Table of Motions 39 

Appendix E Report of the Capital Improvement Committee 40 

Appendix F Unspent Articles 44 



148 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 



MAY 2007 TOWN MEETING 
(FY 2008 BUDGET) 

The Finance Committee is charged annually with reviewing the budget proposed for the next 
fiscal year as recommended by the Town Administrator and approved by the Board of 
Selectmen, and then making an independent recommendation of budget appropriations to Town 
Meeting. Town Meeting acts upon the budget recommendations of the Finance Committee in its 
approval of the next fiscal year's budget. This form of government provides a check and balance 
on the budget recommendations, with the ultimate authority for determining the budget being the 
responsibility of Town Meeting, on behalf of the Town's residents. 

The Finance Committee's attention this year has been predominantly focused on the negative 
impact on the school department of limited discretionary fimds in a year constrained by limited 
new revenue, no planned operating override, and substantial increases in fixed costs, including 
the increased operational costs of bringing on line the new high school in September 2007. 
Increases in fixed expenses Town-wide will absorb the anticipated increases in state aid and tax 
revenue achievable under the constraints of Proposition 2 1/2, leaving little fimds available for 
non-fixed expense purposes, which includes salaries and departmental expenses. Personnel cuts 
are a necessary result of this year's limited fimds. 

Swampscott is predominantly residential (94% or $2.4 billion of the $2.6 billion real estate 
property tax base), and the Town is heavily reliant on the property tax to balance the budget. In 
FY 2007, 70% of the overall budget (General Fund and Enterprise Funds) was fimded with 
property taxes, of which over 90% was derived from residential and personal property, 
accounting for almost $32 million of the total $35.4 million taxes levied. The commercial base 
valued at $131 million produced less than 9% or $3.1 million taxes, and the industrial base 
valued at under $14 million produced less than 1% or $327,000 taxes. 

It's unrealistic to think the Town's heavy reliance on the residential property tax can change. 
There is no opportunity to build a commercial base to shift the burden of increasing spending 
requirements off the residential taxpayer. Tax overrides need to be a component of the Town's 
fixture planning efforts, along with efforts to develop new revenue and fiirther efficiencies, 
including consoUdations and regionalization. 

Town Meeting votes only on recommended budget expenditures. These expenditures reflect 
assumptions about revenue growth. The primary source of revenue of the Town is the property 
tax (71%). Other sources include state aid (8%), water and sewer fees (10%), local and 
miscellaneous receipts including the Nahant tuition income (10%), and the use of reserves such 
as free cash (1%). 

Under Proposition 2 Vi Swampscott's taxes in FY 2008 will increase by 2 Vi percent over FY 
2007 (approximately $800,000), plus by another .8% by taxing estimated new growth 
(approximately $275,000), plus by another 1.9% to raise the increase in principal and interest 



149 



payments on debt (debt service) excluded from Proposition 2 V2 (approximately $615,000). 
These components total $1,695,000, or a 4.8% increase in estimated FY 2008 property taxes over 
FY 2007. 

State aid in FY 2008 is expected to increase $220,761 or 5.3% over FY 2007, to $4,350,200. 
However, Nahant school tuition is estimated to decrease by an estimated $1 18,000 or -8.4% as a 
result of decreased enrollment. 

The total net increase from property taxes, state aid and all other sources of recurring revenue are 
estimated to aggregate $1.9 million in FY 2008. This amount, together with the recommended 
use of $647,000 of Town reserves, is the sum of new revenue available to fimd the increased 
budget requests for FY 2008. 

However, increases in fixed costs alone will utilize all of the $1.9 million in net new revenue. 
These increases in fixed costs include $615,000 increase in the debt exclusion, $600,000 increase 
in maintenance and operation costs of the new high school, $250,000 increase in group health 
insurance costs, $200,000 increase to fimd employee retirement benefits, $40,000 increase in 
Medicare costs, $30,000 increase in property and casualty insurance premium, $35,000 increase 
in regional school district assessment, $81,000 increase in non-excluded debt service, and 
$30,000 for imemployment compensation. 

In addition to these non-discretionary fixed cost increases for FY 2008, original departmental 
budget requests for so-called discretionary items, including contractual and anticipated 
contractual salary agreements, totaled close to $2 million, as shown in the Warrant. 

The Finance Committee's Recommended Budget reflects various reductions in FY 2008 
spending versus FY 2007, as well as various increases in salaries to reflect existing contracts for 
non-school employees, in concurrence for the most part and except as detailed below, with the 
Town Administrator's recommendation. 

Other than fixed costs, the only significant increase the Town Administrator recommended was 
$500,000 to the School Department. This recommendation, along with the net other increases 
and decreases in all the various line items leaves a structural gap in revenues versus expenditures 
of $647,000, which is reconmaended to be offset with appropriations of one-time revenue sources 
including $500,000 of free cash, and $147,000 of overlay surplus (the amount currently in the 
overlay reserve account that the assessors determined is not needed for abatements). 

The use of $647,000 of one-time revenue is high but consistent with the $660,000 of one time 
revenue used to balance the budget in FY 2007, and should not in and of itself, fiirther 
compromise the Town's credit rating. However, the Finance Committee believes any additional 
use of reserves, including the use of any capitalized fiiture revenue stream, would compromise 
the credit, diminish the Town's akeady diminished financial flexibility, and compound the 
structural budget gap assimied for FY 2009. 

Subsequent to the Board of Selectmen's approval of the Town Administrator Recommendations 
contained in the Warrant, the Town learned it will receive an additional $129,844 state aid above 



150 



the Town Administrator's assumption, and that health ins;urance costs could be reduced by an 
estimated $120,000 as a result of assumed reductions in staffing. These amounts free up 
$249,844 in funds for reallocation. The Finance Committee's Recommendations reflect the 
following changes to the Town Administrator's Recommendations to reflect the allocation of 
these additional funds: 

- $120,000 reduced from Insurance Employee Group Health; from $4,425,000 to 
$4,305,000 as a result of staff reductions 

- $15,000 reduced from Recreation to be funded in the Recreation Revolving Fund; 
from $50,000 to $35,000 

- $2,308 added to the Veterans' Service Director, from $7,000 to $9,308 

- $ 1 7,000 added to Library Other Compensation, from $ 1 3,500 to $30,500 

- $3,000 added to Library Materials, from $ 1 07,989 to $$ 1 1 0,989 

- $27,000 added to the Reserve Fund, from $ 1 28,000 to $ 1 55,000, restoring the reserve 
to the same amount funded in FY 2005, FY 2006 and FY 2007. 

- $15,000 added to the Stabilization Fund, from $40,000 to $55,000, raising the 
aggregate in the fund to about $480,000, significanfly under the $1.2 million fund 
balance position at June 30, 2003. 

- $25,400 added to the Regional Vocational School assessment, from $250,000 to 
$275,400 

- $175,000 added to Schools, from $21,268,389 to $21,443,389 

It was also learned subsequent to the Town Administrator's Recommendation that the MWRA 
assessment to the Town in FY 2008 will be reduced by $460,250, which because it is accounted 
for in the Water Enterprise Fimd, will not benefit the General Fund, but will result in less cost to 
be supported by the water user fee. The Finance Committee Recommendations include the 
following changes to the Town Administrator Recommendations that will affect the Water and 
Sewer Enterprise Funds: 

- $20,000 added to Sewer Personnel; from $301,811 to $321,811 (to fimd renewal 
contract) 

- $20,000 added to Water Personnel; from $297,316 to $317,316 (to fimd renewal 
contract) 

- $460,250 reduced from Water Expenses - MWRA; from $1,845,250 to $1,385,000 

The Finance Committee's recommendations are based on maintaining fiscal integrity in order to 
safeguard as best as possible the Town's coveted Aa3 credit rating (the lowest in the AA 
category), and balancing limited available resources among town departments. Reserve levels 
have been drawn upon heavily in recent years. The Town's credit rating is already at risk. 
Moody's rating agency's latest review of the Town's credit rating in January 2007 noted "the 
Town's still diminished financial position following several years of reserve reductions... will 
continue to be well below the 8.5% median available reserve of other Commonwealth 
communities, and significantly below the 16.2% Aa3 unreserved fund balance national median. 
....We believe for Swampscott to maintain its current rating, the town must.... stabilize financial 
operations as well as create and implement a solid multi-year plan to restore the available 
reserves to levels more in-line with similarly rated communities". The nominal amount of funds 



recommended by the Finance Committee to be added to the Stabilization Fund, and restored to 
the Reserve Fund, reflect a conscious effort to commit to protecting the Town's reserve position. 
Future budgets will require a more aggressive effort to rebuild reserves in order to maintain the 
current rating which impacts the value of property and desirability of investing and locating in 
the Town. 

For the Finance Committee, the current financial constraints are a fiscal reality to be reconciled 
and balanced as fairly as possible. There are not enough funds available, or willingness to make 
funds available, for all the requests and all the desired improvements to programs and 
infi^tructure in town. With $2.6 million in budget requests over and above the budget 
recommended by the Finance Committee, there is a lot of pain reflected in this year's budget 
across-the-board, and particularly in the School Department. 

As predicted by the Finance Committee in its Report one year ago to Town Meeting, wdthout an 
override for FY 2008, the Town would be faced with service cuts. The budget recommended by 
the Finance Committee reflects cuts of teachers, public safety and D.P.W. personnel, and library 
hours, just to identify several areas of loss. With back to back tax increases of 8.4% in FY 2007, 
following a 12.6% increase in FY 2006, it's understandable that there is little appetite for more 
tax overrides. 

Compounding the anti-tax sentiment in town is the lack of planning in the face of $600,000 of 
known increased costs to open the new high school in FY 2008. No plan was developed to cut 
costs, and no plan was developed to substantiate the need and establish support for an operating 
override, for any purpose, including the school budget. 

Additionally, and most disconcerting, the Finance Committee was not provided a line item 
budget request fi-om the School Department, as was provided by every other town department. 
As a consequence, the Finance Conmiittee lacked any detailed information in its review of the 
School Department budget in its deliberations relative to the allocation of discretionary funds. 
Nevertheless, the Finance Committee has recommended that the majority of discretionary fimds 
be allocated to the School Department for its purposes. 

The school department FY 2008 budget as recommended by the Finance Conamittee is 
$21,443,389, an increase of $675,000 or 3.3% over FY 2007. The recommended amount 
represents almost 46% of the total recommended General Fund budget, and excludes another 5% 
of other school related costs bome by the Town, including school employee benefits and school 
debt service. In the aggregate, total school related costs exceed 50% of the Town's budget, 
reflecting Swampscott's historically strong financial commitment to its school system. 

However, in accordance with state law. Town Meeting approves only a single line item for the 
School Department, and has no legal authority to direct how such funds are spent. So for FY 
2008 46% of the General Fund budget is reflected in a single line item appropriated for the 
School Department, the expenditure of which is overseen and approved solely by and at the 
discretion of the School Committee. This autonomy has led to unacceptable deficiencies in 
accountability. Standard financial practices and oversight are currently lacking. Financial 
planning and coordination with Town boards and committees has been too limited. A hastily 



152 



assembled line item budget for FY 2008 was produced after the Finance Committee needed to 
conclude its deliberations and recommendations for the Town Warrant. The Finance Committee 
recommends that the School Committee correct its lack of financial due diligence, oversight and 
planning before budget deliberations for FY 2009, in order that the Finance Committee and the 
Town have the proper detail to recommend the allocation of any additional funds to the School 
Department The Finance Committee further recommends that the School Committee conduct 
independent financial audits of both school operations, and SPED, conduct a full-blown 
operational procedures review, produce monthly appropriation control statements available for 
review, prepare multi-year budget forecasts, and consider integration of its business office into 
the Town's business office. 

Swampscott is a desirable seaside residential community, characterized by higher wealth and a 
higher average tax bill than its peers, and constrained by its small size and residential character. 
The budget will remain under constant pressure. The Town needs to plan its fiscal future in an 
aggressive, all-inclusive process in order to gain credibility for future overrides to maintain 
quality services. Elected officials, boards and committees need to work together to develop a 
multi-year stable fiscal plan for the delivery of services that reflect the will and gain the support 
of Swampscott residents. This includes the development of a comprehensive plan for 
consolidations, regionalization, use, sale and reuse of all capital assets, future capital needs, 
economic development initiatives, revenue diversification, and the rebuilding of reserve 
positions consistent with the wealth of the tax base. The Finance Committee recommends that 
the Town's elected officials lead this effort and begin the process at the conclusion of Town 
Meeting. 

The difficulties experienced in this year's budget process have already created a cooperative 
mindset and willingness to begin such an initiative. However, the devil is in the details, and 
there are a lot of moving parts to consider and evaluate. Such an effort will benefit every aspect 
of governing and shaping Swampscott, and protecting its unique qualities for generations to 
come. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Swampscott Finance Committee 

Cinder McNemey, Chairman 
Scott Burke, Vice-Chairman 
Michael Callahan 
Jeremy Davis 
Tom Dawley 
Rand Folta 
Deborah Fox 
Don Pinkerton 



i 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
SUMMARY OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURES 



I. REVENUES 

TAX LEVY 
DEBT EXCLUSION 
NEW GROWTH 
SUBTOTAL 

LOCAL RECEIPTS 
OUTSIDE TUITIONS 
EST CHERRY SHEET 
INTERGOVERNMENTAL 
SUBTOTAL 

TOTAL REVENUE 

II. EXPENSES 

TOWN BUDGETS 
SCHOOL BUDGET 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 
SHARED EXPENSES 
HEALTH INSURANCE 
RETIREMENT 
MEDICARE 

PROPERTY & CASUALTY INSURANCE 
WORKERS COMPENSATION 
UNCOMPENSATED BALANCES 
RESERVE FUND 
DEBT 

TOWN AUDIT 
UNEMPLOYMENT 
STABILIZATION 
OVERLAY PROVISIONS 

ASSESSMENTS/OFFSETS 

Snow & Ice Deficit 
TOTAL EXPENSES 

BALANCE AVAILABLE 

ONE TIME REVENUES 

ASSESSORS OVERLAY 
FREE CASH 
STABILIZATION 
FUND 030 ARTICLES 
SALE OF LOTS FUND 
OUTSIDE TUITION ACCOUNT 
EXCESS/(DEFICIT) 





DEPARTMENT 


ADMINISTRATOR 


FINANCE COM. 


ADOPTED 


REQUEST 


RECOMMENDED 


RECOMMENDED 


FY07 


FY08 


FY08 


FY08 


31 ,795,507 


32.936,439 


AA AAA AAA 

32,936,439 


AA AAA AAA 

32,936,439 


0,^00,U90 


0,9UU,0/3 


O,9U0,O/O 


3,900,o75 


337,604 


275.000 


275,000 


275.000 


35.418.169 


37,112,314 


37,112,314 


37.112.314 


3,134.105 


3.125,000 


3.148,000 


3.148,000 


1.403,025 


1,403,025 


1,285.120 


1,285.120 


4,129,439 


4.232,675 


4.220,356 


4.350,200 


550,000 


AAA 

650.000 


A^A AAA 

650.000 


AAA AAA 

650,000 


9,216,569 


9.410,700 


9.303.476 


9,433,320 


44,634,738 


46,523,014 


46,415.790 


46.545.634 


- 

10,970,712 


11,678.185 


10,973.973 


10,981,281 


20,768,389 


23,039,825 


21.268.389 


21,443.389 


239,023 


254,023 


250,000 


275,400 


4,068,125 


4,545,100 


4,425,000 


4,305,000 


2,742,135 


2,927.715 


2,927.715 


2,927,715 


300,000 


340.000 


340.000 


340.000 


315,000 


360.000 


345.000 


345,000 


180,000 


180.000 


180.000 


180,000 


145,000 


115.000 


5o!oOO 


50.000 


155.000 


155.000 


128.000 


155.000 


4,592,488 


5.294.285 


5,289.285 


5,289,285 


42.000 


42,000 


42.000 


42,000 






30,000 


30.000 


36,977 


75,000 


40,000 


55,000 


182,019 


200,000 


200.000 


187,000 


569,653 


569.653 


580.272 


580,272 


45,296,521 


49,775,786 


47.069.634 


47,186,342 


(661.783) 


(3,252,772) 


(653,844) 


(640.708) 




150.000 


160,000 


147.000 


660.011 


500,000 


500,000 


500,000 



25,000 
23,228 



(2,602,772) 



6,156 



6.292 



ENTERPRISE FUNDS 

WATER RECEIPTS 3.164.574 3.447,931 3.433.766 2,993,516 

SEWER RECEIPTS 1,786,747 2,056,516 1,992,905 2.012,905 

SEWER EXPENSES 1,786,747 2,056,516 1,992.905 2.012.905 

WATER EXPENSES 3.164.574 3.447.931 3.433.766 2.993,516 



154 



NOTICE OF ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



The Annual Town Meeting of 2007 will convene on Tuesday, April 24, 2007, with Article 1 
(the Town Election) at 7:00 a.m. in the Town's regular polling places. At 8:00 p.m., the Town 
Meeting will be adjoumed until Monday, May 7, 2007, 7:15 p.m., in the former Temple Israel 
building located at 837 Humphrey Street, Swampscott. 



NOTICE OF ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY. MAY 7. 2007. 7:15 P.M. 



To the Town Meeting members: 



Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article I, Section 2, of the Bylaws of the Town of 
Swampscott that the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting will be held on Monday, May 7, 2007, 
beginning at 7:15 p.m. in the former Temple Israel building located at 837 Humphrey Street, 
Swampscott. 

The required identification badge is to be picked up at the auditorium entrance when you 
check in. 

NOTICE OF PRECINCT CAUCUS MEETINGS 

Caucus meetings for all Swampscott precincts have been scheduled for Monday, May 7, 
2007, beginning at 6:45 p.m. in the fonmer Temple Israel building located at 837 Humphrey 
Street, Swampscott Room assignments are as follows: 

Precinct 1 - Room TBA Precinct 4 - Room TEA 

Precinct 2 - Room TBA Precinct 5 - Room TBA 

Precinct 3 - Room TBA Precinct 6 - Room TBA 

NOTES: 

Please remember that it is YOUR responsibility to be recorded as being present with the 
door checkers prior to entering the auditorium for EACH session. Excessive absences are cause 
for removal from Town Meeting membership. Also, please remember the following: 

1. You must wear (display) your Town Meeting identification badge at all times; 

2. Remember to use the microphones when speaking on any issue so that your 
comments may be recorded on the official transcript of the meeting and be heard 
by your fellow members in the hall and residents viewing the live cable telecast. 

Russell Patten 
Clerk of Swampscott 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
April 2007 



SS. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
Inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections and Town affairs to vote at: 



Precinct One 
Precinct Two 
Precinct Three 
Precinct Four 
Precinct Five 
Precinct Six 



Clarke School 
Clarke School 

First Church Congregational 
First Church Congregational 
Swampscott High School 
Swampscott High School 



Norfolk Avenue 
Norfolk Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Forest Avenue 
Forest Avenue 



on Tuesday, the twenty-fourth day of April, 2007, from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following 
purpose: 

To choose a Moderator for one (1) year 

To choose two (2) members for the Board of Selectmen for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Board of Assessors for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Board of Assessors for one (1) year 

To choose two (2) members for the School Committee for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Trustees of the Public Library for three (3) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Board of Health for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) member for the Planning Board for five (5) years 

To choose three (3) Constables for three (3) years 

To choose eighteen (18) Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) precincts for three (3) 
years. 

To choose two (2) Town Meeting Members in precinct one for one (1) year. 

At the close of tiie election, the meeting will adjourn to Monday, May 7, 2007, at 7:15 p.m. 
in the fomner Temple Israel building located at 837 Humphrey Street, Swampscott 



156 



ARTICLE 2. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards and 

Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This routine Article appears every year to allow Town groups to make 
reports. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court to the end that 

special legislation be adopted as set forth below; provided however, that the General Court may 
make clerical or editorial changes of form only to the bill, unless: the Board of Selectmen 
approves amendments to the bill prior to enactment by the General Court which shall be within 
the scope of the general public objectives of this petition, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to approve said amendments: 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1 . Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or 
special law to the contrary, and upon approval by a majority vote 
of a Swampscott Town meeting, the parents, whether natural, 
adoptive, or those who stood in loco parentis to, Army Specialist 
Jared J. Raymond, and Marine Captain Jennifer J. Harris, shall 
receive a one hundred percent real estate tax exemption for real 
estate located at 4 Elwin Street, Swampscott, MA, and 30 
Pitman Road, Swampscott, MA, such exemption to be effective 
for Fiscal Year 2008. 

Or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This article will allow the Board of Selectmen to petition the state 
legislature to allow the Town to abate the Fiscal 2008 real estate taxes of the parents of 
Army Specialist Jared Raymond and Captain Jennifer Harris, who lost their lives in Iraq, 
while in service to this country. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of M.G.L., Chap. 40, 

Sec. 8J, to establish a commission on disability. Said commission shall consist of not less than 
five nor more than nine members to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen. A majority of said 
commission members shall consist of people of disabilities, one member shall be a member of 
the immediate family of a person with a disability and one member of said commission shall be 
either an elected or appointed official of the Town. The terms of the first members of said 
commission shall be for one, two or three years, and so arranged that the term of one-third of 
members expires each year, and their successor shall be appointed for tenns of three years 
each, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Such commission shall (1) research local problems of people with 
disabilities; (2) advise and assist municipal officials and employees in ensuring 
compliance with state and federal laws and regulations that affect people with disabilities; 
(3) coordinate and carry out programs of tiie Massachusetts office on disability; (4) 
review and make recommendations about policies, procedures, services, activities and 
facilities of departinents, boards and agencies of the town as they affect people with 
disabilities; (5) provide infomiation, refenrals, guidance and technical assistance to 
individuals, public agencies, businesses and organizations in all matters pertaining to 
disability; (6) coordinate activities of other local groups organized for similar purposes. 



157 



ARTICLE 5. To see if Town Meeting will vote to accept, for all boards, committees or 

commissions, holding adjudicatory hearing in the Town, the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 39, Sec. 23D which provides that a member of a board, committee or commission 
holding an adjudicatory hearing shall not be disqualified from voting in the matter solely due to a 
member's absence from one session of such hearing, provided that certain conditions are met 
and provided further that such acceptance shall be applicable to all adjudicatory hearings opened 
on or after the effective date of the vote taken hereunder, or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a resolution supporting exploration 

of the concept of establishing a regional operations center (ROC) for Essex County; and further to 
authorize the Town Administrator to appoint an individual to serve as the town's representative to 
a committee of similar representatives from other municipalities in Essex County that adopt a 
similar resolution, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This article would authorize the Town Administrator to appoint an 
individual to explore the benefits of have Swampscott public safety calls dispatched by a 
regional dispatch center that would perfomn the same service for other municipalities in 
Essex County. 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court to the end that 

special legislation be adopted amending the Town Charter to reduce the number of elected Town 
Meeting members, as on file with the Town Cleri<; provided however, that the General Court may 
make clerical or editorial changes of form only to the bill, unless the Board of Selectmen 
approves amendments to the bill prior to enactment by the General Court which shall be within 
the scope of the general public objectives of this petition, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to approve said amendments: 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Please refer to the report of the Town Meeting Size Committee. 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Moderator and the 

Town Administrator to appoint a Town Building Study Committee consisting of seven members, 
all of which must be residents of the Town of Swampscott. The purpose of the committee will be 
to recommend possible uses and reuses of municipal and school buildings for consideration by 
the Selectmen and School Committee, said committee shall file a preliminary report with the 
Town Clerk on or before December 31, 2007, and a final report with a Town Clerk on or before 
April 1, 2008, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This committee would be charged with developing a long range plan for 
the appropriate use and re-use of all public buildings. 



158 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by 

borrowing or otherwise and vote to appropriate the sum of $499,508, originally borrowed for the 
purposes described in Appendix F hereto, which amounts are not longer needed to complete the 
projects for which they were initially borrowed, to pay for the following projects, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

No. Purpose Requested Recommended 

School Department 

08-01 Mag. Door Holder/Auto Openers (Forest Ave) 25,000 25.000 

08-02 Handicapped Access Bathroom (Forest Ave) 45,000 45,000 

08-03 Retro-fit Classroom (Forest Ave) 75.000 75,000 
08-04 Update Master Plan 150.000 150.000 

08-05 Interior Door Replacement (Hadley) 40.583 40.583 

08-06 Plumbing Renovations (Clarke and Hadley) 60.000 60.000 

08-07 Motorized Bleachers (Forest Ave,) 30,000 30,000 

08-08 Asbestos Abatement (Clarke) 92,500 92,500 

08-09 Asbestos Abatement (Stanley) 25,000 25,000 

08-1 Floor Tile Replacement (Stanley) 60.000 60.000 

Department of Public Works 

08-11 Equipment -Bucket Truck 50.000 50.000 

08-12 Boat Ramp 100.000 94,000 

08-13 Playground and Open Space Improvements 50.000 50.000 

08-14 Public Buildings Maintenance 80,000 80,000 
08-15Phillips Beach Outfall 120.000 120.000 

Police Department 

08-16 Replace Dispatch Operations Consoles 54.000 54.000 

08-17 Police Cruisers (2) 58.000 29.000 

Fire Department 

08-18 Fire Vehicle 44.000 28.000 

08-19 Security/Overhead Door 51,575 61.575 

Technology 

08-20 Equipment upgrades and replacement 50.000 50.000 

08-21 GIS 50,000 25,000 

Traffic 

08-22 Stetson @ Essex Improvements 200,000 200,000 

Total funds 1,510,658 1,434,658 
Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be 
spent only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital improvement Committee 

Comment: The above projects were recommended for funding in FY2008 by the 
Capital Improvement Committee (CIC). Refer to Appendix E for the complete CIC report. 
Appendix F contains a list of previously approved capital articles, which for various 
reasons remain unspent These unspent funds will be used to offset the costs of the 
projects identified in this article. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 
Article 9 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 



159 



ARTICLE 1 0. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, by 

borrowing or otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 

No. Purpose Requested Recommended 



School Department 

08-23 Copier Replacement 90,560 

08-24 Window Replacement III (Clarke) 58,333 

08-25 Parking Lot Repairs I (Forest Ave) 142,500 

Department of Public Works 

08-26 Street Signs 25,000 
Police Department 

08-27 Firearms Simulator 45,000 

08-28 Technology Upgrade 35,000 

Fire Department 

08-29 Pumper 400,000 

08-30 Radio Alarm Box Equipment 54,400 

08-31 Upgrade Municipal Alarm System 35,500 

Library 

08-32 Carpeting 30,000 
Emergency Management 

08-33 Equipment and Supplies 50,000 
Recreation 

08-34 Machon Playground Improvements 160,000 

Total funds 1,126,293 

Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be 
spent only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 



Comment: The above projects were not recommended for funding in FY2008 by the 
Capital Improvement Committee. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to repair, 

construct or reconstruct streets, together with all necessary work incidental thereto, including 
engineering, in conjunction with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, under General Laws, 
Chapter 90 or otherwise; and to transfer for this purpose any unexpended balance of 
appropriations voted for this purpose at prior Town Meetings, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Director of Public Works 

Comment: The purpose of this article is to appropriate monies approved by the 
Legislature for highway and traffic safety projects as approved by the Massachusetts 
Highway Department. The monies may be spent for more than one year. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



160 



ARTICLE 1 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $1 ,400,000 for Fiscal 2008 

to improve the Town's sewer system and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $1 ,400,000 under MGL c. 44 or any 
other enabling authority; and the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Administrator be 
authorized to contract for and expend any federal, state or State Revolving Fund (SRF) aid 
available for the project, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Administrator 
to submit, on t>ehalf of the Town, any and all applications deemed necessary for grants and/or 
reimbursements from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the United States under any state 
and/or federal programs to receive and accept such grants or reimbursement for this purpose, 
and/or any others in any way connected with the scope of this Article, provided that the amount of 
the authorized borrowing shall be reduced by the amount of such aid received prior to the 
issuance of bonds or notes under this vote and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town 
Administrator be authorized to take any other action necessary to carry out this project., or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Director of Public Wori<s 

Comment In order for the town to apply for, and spend, a low interest loan from the 
state to make improvements to the town's sewer system that was mandated by the State 
Department of Environmental Protection, Town Meeting has to vote in the affirmative to 
support this article. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 
Article 12 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 

ARTICLE 1 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $560,266 for Fiscal 2008 to 

improve the Town's water system and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $560,266 under MGL c. 44 or any 
other enabling authority and to issue bonds and notes therefor; and the Board of Selectmen 
and/or the Town Administrator be authorized to contract for and expend any federal, state or 
MWRA aid available for the project, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town 
Administrator to submit, on behalf of the Town, any and all applications deemed necessary for 
grants and/or reimbursements from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the United States 
under any state and/or federal programs to receive and accept such grants or reimbursement for 
this purpose, and/or any others in any way connected with the scope of this Article, provided that 
the amount of the authorized borrowing shall be reduced by the amount of such aid received prior 
to the issuance of bonds or notes under this vote and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the 
Town Administrator be authorized to take any other action necessary to carry out this project., or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Director of Public Works 

Comment In order to receive the Town's share of the allocation. Town Meeting has 
to vote in the affinnative to appropriate the necessary funds. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 

Article 13 requires 2/3's affirmative vote to adopt 



161 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Job Classification and Salary 

Plan of the Personnel Board Bylaws, as it applies to those positions not covered by collective 
bargaining agreements, and appropriate the necessary funds, by bOTGwing or otherwise, as 
recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action relative thereto. The proposed 
modified classification schedule can be found in Appendix A. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article will increase the salaries of those positions covered under 
the Personnel Board Bylaws by three percent (3%). 

The Finance Committee will report on tliis Article at Town lUleeting. 



ARTICLE 1 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board Bylaws, 

other than wage and salary classification, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment This article allows the Town to adopt changes to the Personnel By-Laws, 
new positions created on or after this date will not be eligible for a cost of living increase 
until July 2008. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



ARTICLE 1 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board By-Laws so 

as to reclassify certain existing positions, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any 
action relative thereto. The proposed modified classification schedule can be found in Appendix 
A. 

Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article allows the Town to reclassify positions covered by the 
Personnel By-Laws. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



ARTICLE 1 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by 

borrowing or othenvise, to fund and implement the collective bargaining agreements between the 
Board of Selectmen and the various unions under the Board of Selectmen for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1, 2007, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining 
agreements. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



162 



ARTICLE 1 8. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, by 

borrowing or otherwise, to fund and implement the collective bargaining agreements between the 
School Department personnel and the Town, which includes, but is not limited to, teachers, 
school administrators, custodians, cafeteria workers, and clerical employees for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1 , 2007, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining 
agreements. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



ARTICLE 1 9. To see what action the Town will take in relation to the salaries of elected 

Town Officials for the ensuing year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The statutes require that the Town vote to fix salaries of elected Officers 
annually. The appropriation is in Article 26. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to fix salaries as follows: 
Constable $100 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to transfer unexpended balances as 

shown on the books of the Town Accountant as of June 30, 2006, to the Surplus Revenue 
Accounts, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This is a routine article to make use of funds, which were appropriated in 
prior fiscal years but not spent. Generally, such funds have been appropriated under 
Articles, other tiian the general budget, since unspent budget monies "expire" at the end 
of the year and become free cash. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town IMeeting. 



ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer funds from various Town 

accounts which have monies remaining therein to such other Town accounts which reflect a 
deficit or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administi^tor 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to "capture " unexpended funds, which will 
remain in the various Town accounts as of June 30, 2007, which is the end of the fiscal 
year. Such monies could automatically flow into the Town's free cash, but would be not 
available to reduce the tax rate until the succeeding fiscal year, i.e., beginning July 1, 
2008. These funds have already been appropriated and have been reflected in our 
current tax bills. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



163 



wmmmmmmmmm 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue 

Account of the Town to the account of Current Revenue a sum of money to be used and applied 
by the Board of Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It 
results from the difference between estimates and actual receipts of departmental 
collections and revenues (such as licenses, permits, etc.) plus unexpended funds from 
departmental budgets. When uncollected taxes are subtracted from surplus revenue, the 
total is "Free Cash". This is normally surplus revenue available for Town Meeting to be 
used to reduce taxes for the coming year. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town IMeeting. 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the Council 

on Aging Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Council on Aging and used for the 
deposit of receipts collected through public donations; and further to allow the Council on Aging to 
expend funds not to exceed $25,000 for fiscal year 2008 from said account for ongoing supplies 
and equipment. This would be contingent upon an annual report from the Council on Aging to the 
Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to promote good fiscal responsibility through 
the continuation of a petty cash account of monies received and paid out. The Council 
on Aging would also have the responsibility of reporting to the Town the total receipts and 
expenditures through this account each fiscal year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of the 

Recycling - Blue Bins Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Health Department 
and used for the deposit of receipts collected through the sale of recycling bins; and further to 
allow the Health Department to expend funds not to exceed $5,000 for fiscal year 2008 from said 
account for ongoing supplies and equipment. This would be contingent upon an annual report 
from the Health Department to the Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account 
each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to allow funds received from recycling 
activities (e.g., sale of recycling bins) to be used solely for additional recycling and health 
activities. The Health Department would also have the responsibility of reporting to the 
Town the total receipts and expenditures through this account each fiscal year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 



164 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the continuation of a Recreation 

Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, said account to be under the direction of the Town Administrator and used for the deposit 
of receipts collected through user fees of recreation programs; and further, to allow the Town 
Administrator to expend funds not to exceed $100,000 for fiscal year 2008 from said account for 
ongoing supplies, salaries and equipment. This would be contingent upon an annual report from 
the Recreation Department to the Town on the total receipts and expenditures of the Account 
each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to allow funds received from recreation 
activities to t>e used solely for additional recreation activities. The Town 
Administrator/Recreation Department would also have the responsibility of reporting to 
the Town the total receipts and expenditures through this account each fiscal year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 



ARTICLE 26. To act on the report of the Finance Committee on the Fiscal Year 2008 

budget and to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds money for the operation of 
the Town's Departments and the payment of debt service and all other necessary and proper 
expenses for the year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Finance Committee 

Comment: The Finance Committee's recommendation will be the initial motion on 
the floor to deal with this budget. The budget as printed here will be amended to reflect 
any changes voted at this Town Meeting. The Moderator has traditionally allowed for 
discussion and reconsideration of each line item within this budget individually and in any 
order. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



165 



DEPARTMENTAL BUDGET 

July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 





Approp. 




Approp. 


It 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 








Fr07 


No. 






ri us 




rT oo 




FY'08 












vaenerai uovemmGni 
























MODERATOR 














$ 




$ 






Expenses 


$ 


- 


8 


- 


S 




$ 


• 


$ 


- 




Total Moderator Budget 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 












FINANCE COMMITTEE 
















- 








Secretary 




■ 












200 




200 


1 


Expenses 




200 




200 




200 


$ 


200 


$ 


200 




Total Finance Committee Budget 


$ 


200 


$ 


200 


$ 


200 












SELECTMEN'S OFFICE 
















_ 




_ 




Board Expenses 












_ 




6,950 




7,500 




Office Expenses 




7,500 




7.500 




7,500 




3.250 




3.750 




Mass. Municipal Assoc. 




4.314 




4.314 




4.314 




- 




- 




Union Related Expenses 




- 








- 




- 




- 




Contingent 




- 




- 




- 




10^00 




11,280 


2 


Total Expenses 




11,814 




11,814 




11.814 


$ 


10.200 


$ 


11,250 




Total Budget 


1 


11,814 


$ 


11,814 


$ 


11,814 












TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 














$ 


102,804 


$ 


105,889 




Town Administrator 




119.314 




119.314 




119,314 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 




Personnel Manager 












- 


$ 


33,475 


$ 


39,601 




Administrative Assistant 




43,486 




43,486 




43.486 


$ 


4,400 


$ 


4.860 




Other Compensation 




- 




- 




- 


$ 


140,679 


$ 


150,350 


3 


Total Salaries 


$ 


162,800 


$ 


162,800 


$ 


162,800 


$ 


1,750 


$ 


2.100 


4 


Expenses 




2,400 




2,400 




2.400 


$ 


142,429 


$ 


152^450 




Total Town Administrator Budget 


$ 


166,200 


$ 


165.200 


$ 


165,200 












LAW DEPARTMENT 
















45,000 




65,000 


5 


Town Counsel Contract Expense 




85,000 




70,000 




70,000 


$ 


48,000 


$ 


66,000 




Total Law Budget 


$ 


85,000 


$ 


70.000 


$ 


70,000 












PARKING TICKET CLERK 
















- 




- 


6 


Salary 




- 




- 




- 




6.000 




6.500 


7 


Expenses 




8.500 




8.500 




8.500 


$ 


6,000 


$ 


6,500 




Total Packing Ctailc Budget 


$ 


8.500 


$ 


8,500 


$ 


8,500 












WORKERS' COMPENSATION 
















100,000 




110.000 




Expenses (Police & Fire) 




110,000 




110,000 




110.000 




180,000 




180,000 




Benefits/insurance 




180,000 




180.000 




180,000 


$ 


280,000 


$ 


290,000 


8 


Total Workars' Comp Budget 


$ 


290.000 


$ 


290,000 


$ 


290,000 












PERSONNEL 














$ 


32,408 




28,700 




Personnel Manager 




33,695 




33.695 




33.695 


$ 






18,313 




Assistant 




38,896 




19,448 




19.448 


$ 






764 




Other Compensation 




1.295 




1,295 




1.295 


$ 


32,408 


$ 


47,786 





Total Salaries 




73.886 




54.438 




54.438 








1,000 


9A 


Expenses 




3.500 




2,000 




2,000 


$ 


32,408 


$ 


48,786 




Total Personnel Budget 


$ 


77.386 


$ 


66,438 


$ 


56,438 



166 













Department 


Administrator 


FInarKe Committee 


Approp. 




Approp. 


It 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 


FVOS 




FY'07 


No. 




FY'08 




FY'08 




FY'08 










ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 












79,581 




81,969 




Accountant 


84,428 




84,428 




84,428 


36,421 




41,000 




Asst Town Accountant 


41,906 




41,006 




41,906 


1,850 




1,850 




Other Compensation 


2,000 




2,000 




2,000 


117,852 




124,819 


10 


Total Salarias 


128,334 




128,334 




128,334 


100,000 




145,000 


11 


Uncompensated Balances 


115.000 




soiooo 




50,000 










Salary Reserve 






- 






8.690 




9,000 




Office Expenses 


9,000 




8,000 




8,000 


4,000 




4,000 




Educational Expense 


4,500 




3,500 




3,500 


8,690 




9,000 




Outside Services 


9,000 




8,000 




8,000 


21,380 




22,000 


12 


Total Expenses 


22.500 




19,600 




19,500 


239,232 


$ 


291,819 




Total Accounting Budget 


$ 265,834 


$ 


197,834 


$ 


197,834 










TEnHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT 












46,350 




57,000 


13 


Network Speo'alist 


58,000 




58,195 




58,195 


71,450 




90,000 




Outside Services 


95,400 




90,200 




90,200 


3,508 




4,500 




Supplies 


8,000 




3.500 




3,500 


892 




1,000 




Educational Expense 


1,500 




500 




500 


76,860 




96,500 


14 


Total Expense 


104,900 




94,200 




94.200 


122,200 


$ 


162,500 




Total Technology Budgtt 


$ 162,900 


$ 


152.396 


$ 


152.395 










TREASURER/COLLECTOR 












65,015 




OO,900 




Treasurer 


68,974 




68,974 




68,974 


36,421 




42,230 




Asst Treasurer/Collector 


43,486 




- 




- 


74,981 




78,252 




Clerical (2) 


81,819 




81,819 




81,819 


2,300 




1,550 




Other Compensation 


1,500 




1,500 




1,S0U 


178,717 




^ AA AAA 

188,998 


15 


Total Salaries 


196,779 




162.293 




162,293 


10,000 




12,721 




Office Expenses(lncludes Tax Title) 


10,750 




10,750 




10,750 


1,500 




2,500 




Travel/Seminars 


2,250 




2,250 




2,250 


30,890 




35,000 




Postage 


34,150 




34,150 




34,150 


" 




3,500 




Bank Service Fees 


2,500 




2,500 




2,500 


42,390 




63,721 


16 


Total Expenses 


49,660 




49,650 




49,650 


221,107 


$ 


242.719 




Total Treasurer/Collector Budget 


$ 246.429 


$ 


201,943 


$ 


201,943 










TOWN CLERK 












48,000 




49,440 




Town Clerk 


50,917 




50,917 




50,917 






39,126 




Clerical 


40.906 




40.906 




40,906 






5,760 




Poll Wori<ers 


7,260 




7,260 




7,260 


■ 




1,900 




Custodians 


2.000 




2,000 




2,000 






3,550 




Other Compensation 


3,637 




3,637 




3,637 


48,000 


$ 


99,776 


17 


Total Salaries 


$ 104,720 


$ 


104,720 


$ 


104.720 


- 




- 


18 


Town Postage Account* 


- 




- 




- 










'Moved to Treassurer/Collector Budget 
















2,500 




Machine Preparation 


2,500 




2,500 




2,500 


^ Ann 














4,000 




4,000 


2,000 




2,500 




Town Meeting 


2,500 




2,500 




2,500 






7.137 




Election Expenses 


7,137 




7,137 




7.137 


1,500 




1,750 




Travel/Seminars 


1,750 




1,750 




1,750 


e,«oo 




17,887 


19 


Total Expenses 


17,887 




17,887 




17,887 


64,600 


$ 


117,663 




Total Clerk Budget 


$ 122,607 


$ 


122,607 


$ 


122,607 



167 



mmmmmmmm 



Department Administrator FInanca Committea 



Approp. 




Approp. 


It 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 






Fr07 


No. 






pros 




Fr08 




pros 










ELECTION COMMISSION Included w/ Town Clark 










38,447 




- 




Clerk 




- 




- 




- 


1.920 




- 




Poll Workers 




- 




- 




- 


450 




- 




Custodians 




■ 




- 




- 


1,000 




- 




Incentives 




* 




• 




- 


$ 41,817 


$ 


• 


20 


Total Salaries 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 


$ 


- 


- 




- 




Board Expenses 




- 




- 




- 


1,200 




- 




Office Expenses 




■ 




- 




- 


5,857 




- 




Election Expenses 








- 




- 


2,080 




- 




Machine Preparation 




- 




- 




- 


9.137 




- 


21 


Total Expenses 




- 








- 


$ 60,954 


c 

w 






Total Budget 


$ 


- 


$ 


. 


c 

w 












ASSESSOR'S 














53,000 




53,457 




Assistant Assessor 




57,527 




54,104 




54,104 


74,656 




78,252 




Clerical (2) 




81,812 




81,812 




81,812 


4,139 




4,601 




Other Compensation 




5,196 




5,196 




5,196 


$ 131, 79S 


$ 


136.310 


22 


Total Salaries 


$ 


144,536 


$ 


141,112 


% 


141,112 


- 




- 




Board Expenses 




- 




- 




- 


1,000 




1,000 




Appellate Tax Board 




1,000 




1,000 




1.000 


3,000 




1,500 




Office Expenses 




1,500 




1,500 




1,500 


- 




- 




Travel 








- 




- 


2,000 




2,000 




Education/Professional Development 




2,000 




1,000 




1,000 


6,000 




4,600 


23 


Total Expenses 




4,600 




3,800 




3,600 


8,000 




9,000 


24 


Outside Services 




29,000 




22,500 




22,500 


$ 146,796 


$ 


148,810 




Total Assessoi's Budget 




178,036 


$ 


167,112 


% 


167,112 










ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 














2,985 




2,985 


25 


Secretary 




2,«09 




1,500 




1,500 


3,700 




3,700 


26 


Expenses 




3,700 




3,700 




3,700 


$ 6,686 


$ 


6.685 




Total ZBA Budget 


$ 


6,686 


$ 


8.200 


$ 


5,200 










PLANNING 






















Town Planner 




34,763 




34,763 




34 763 






1,800 




Secretary 




1,800 




1,500 




1,500 








77 


Total Salaries 




36,663 




36,263 






940 




940 




Expenses 




1,420 




1,420 




1,420 










Professional Develop/Memberships 




1,735 




1,735 




1,735 








9A 
^0 


Total Expenses 




3,166 




3.165 






9 940 


* 


2,740 




luuii naiiiiiiiij Duujjoi 


c 

w 


39,718 


$ 


39.418 


* 


99.41 B 


9 1,357,660 


6 


<i f40 4 44 

1,538,122 




TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 


$ 


1,669,309 


6 


4 4afl 0A4 

1,488,661 


* 
• 


4 £04 










Pensions 






















CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 














2,439,090 




2,933,139 


29 


Pension Contribution 




2,712,445 




2,712,445 




2,712,449 


% 2.436,066 


$ 


2,533,136 




Total Budget 


$ 


2,712,446 


$ 


2.712.446 


$ 


2,712,445 










NON-CONTRIBUTORY PENSIONS 














197,000 




209,000 


30 


Pension Contribution 




215,270 




215,270 




215,270 


S 197,000 


6 


209,000 




Total Budget 


$ 


215,270 


$ 


216,270 


$ 


216,270 


$ 2,632,056 


$ 


2,742,135 




TOTAL PENSIONS 


$ 


2,927,716 


$ 


2,927,716 


$ 


2,927,716 



168 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 



Approp. 




Approp. 


It 






Paa As¥ini Aalfl Arf 




nOCOi 1 u 1 lOflQvQ 


r T Oo 




rT Ml 


Ma 
IVO> 










r T TJO 










Public Protection 


















POUCE DEPARTMEMT 










90,534 




98,124 




Chief (1) 


102,058 


102,058 




102,058 


66,540 




70,311 




Captain (1) 


74,301 


74,301 




74,301 


266,160 




291,205 




Lieutenants (4) 


309,590 


248,000 




246.000 


290,356 




317,706 




Sergeants (6) 


337,734 


337,734 




337,734 


831,585 




895,030 




Patrolmen (21) 


975,612 


972,946 




972,946 


84,683 




68,055 




Administrative Assistants (1.5) 


91,065 


48,286 




48,286 


10,000 




10,000 




Matrons 


10,000 


10,000 




10,000 


287,365 




336,105 




Vacation/Overtime 


340,549 


315,000 




315,000 






Oft 0^0 




nwlluciyo 


97 367 


97 367 




97 367 


0,0On 




10 mo 




1 Al/AdlAO^AAS/l O 

irivo9ug«iuona(i u 




1 <9,4;UO 




1 o onfi 


^PO 7ftA 












O 1 0,0H£ 




O IO,9n£ 


65,316 




87,467 




Differential 


122,067 


122,087 




122,067 


81,000 




99!231 




Ottier Compensation 


104,000 


104,000 




104.000 




















2,453,568 




2,721,473 


31 


Salary Sutnotal 


AAV AAA 

2,905,093 


A VAA VAA 

2,763,509 




2,763,509 






~ 




Selective Enforcement 




* 




' 










School Traffic Supervisors 










2,453,668 




2,721,473 




Total Salaries 


2,905,093 


2,763,609 




2,763,509 


24,000 




27,500 




Building Expenses 


27,500 


27,500 




27.500 


10,000 




12,000 




Office Expenses 


16.500 


12.000 




12.000 


- 




- 




Travel 


- 


• 




- 


44,408 




48,000 




Equipment Maintenance 


55,000 


48.000 




48,000 


12,000 




12,000 




MODiie Radio 


12,000 


12.000 




12,000 


10,000 




10,000 




Police Training 


10,000 


1 0,000 




10,000 


32,000 




oo AAA 

32,000 




unnorms 


oo AAA 

32.000 


oo AAA 

32,000 




oo AAA 

32,000 










Bi,IIa* DM^ys# \/Am*m 

DUII0t rrOOT VeStS 


















Computer Maintenance/Supplies 










132,408 




141,500 


32 


Total Expenses 


4 AAA 

153,000 


141,500 




AAA CAA 

141,500 








33 


Police Vehicles 


OA AAA 

28,000 
















ANIIMAL CONTROL OrriCER 










10,000 




10,000 


34 


Officer's Salary 








* 


1,500 




1,500 


35 


Expenses 


* 








1,500 




1,500 


36 


Boarding Animals/Pound/Supplies 










$ 13,000 


$ 


13,000 




Subtotal Animal Control 


- 


- 




- 


( 2.598,976 


$ 


2,876,973 




Total Police Budget 


$ 3,087,093 


$ 2,905,009 


$ 


2,905,009 










FIRE DEPARTMENT 










95,722 




97,637 




Chief (1) 


100,078 


100,078 




100,078 


- 




- 




Deputy Chief (1) 


74,152 


74,152 




74,152 


295.655 




302,917 




Captains (4) 


259,308 


259,308 




259,308 


254,765 




261,119 




Lieutenants (4) 


234,330 


234,330 




234,330 


1.141,170 




1,187,338 




Fire Fighters (25) 


1,341,912 


1,189,790 




1,189,790 


5,140 




5,140 




Office Clerk 


5,401 


5,401 




5,401 


5.140 




5,140 




Mechanic 


5,401 


5,401 




5,401 


170,000 




174,250 




Minimum Manning including O.T. & Vacation 


180,000 


175,000 




175,000 


97,599 




105,500 




Holidays 


113,058 


109,773 




109,773 


23,166 




23,166 




Injury Leave 


23,166 


23,000 




23.000 


29,732 




32,180 




Personal Time 


69,520 


67,425 




67,425 


50,249 




52,365 




Shift Differential /Night 


58,791 


57,791 




57,791 


83,749 




87,276 




Shift Differential/Weekend 


97,984 


96,984 




96,984 


11,100 




11,400 




Clothing Allowance 


16,650 


16.650 




16,650 


24.950 




26,750 




Longevity 


21,800 


21.800 




21.800 










cMi oupena 










8.7O0 




10,004 




Out of Grade Pay 


10,000 


9.760 




9,760 










n n iifa Mill n 1 n ii ^AIba^J 

DefiDnilator Stipend 








■ 


OA AAA 

20,000 




27,500 




Sick Leave Buy Backs 


OA AAA 

30,000 


27,500 




27,500 


2,317,897 




2,409,682 


37 


Total Salaries 


2,641,551 


2,474,143 




2,474,143 


34,600 




36,000 




Building Expenses 


38,500 


36,000 




36,000 


5,000 




5,460 




Office Expenses 


5.460 


5,460 




5,460 


1,500 




1,500 




Travel 


1.500 


1,500 




1 ,500 


34,800 




36,000 




Maintenance 


46,900 


40,000 




40,000 


4,500 




4,500 




Communications 


5,000 


4,500 




4,500 


4,000 




4,000 




Fire Prevention 


4,000 


4,000 




A AAA 

4,000 










Fire HoftA 


3 000 


3 000 




3 000 










Rre Investigations 


3!oOO 








84,400 




87.460 


38 


Total Expenses 


107,360 


94,460 




94,460 


18,000 




23,000 


39 


Protective Clothing 


23,000 


23,000 




23,000 


66,800 




69,800 


40 


Lynn Dispatch/Mutual Aid 


75,800 


75,800 




75,800 


25,000 




27,500 


41 


Training 


27,500 


27,500 




27,500 


$ 2.512,097 


$ 


2,617,442 




Total Hra Budget 


$ 2.875,211 


$ 2,694,903 


$ 


2,694,903 



169 













Department 


Administrator 


Finance Committee 


Approp. 






lb 




Re<iuested 


Recommended 




Recommended 


rx uo 




PV'07 
r I Uf 


Ma 

no* 




ri oo 




FY'08 




FY'08 










riAnDUKMMlcK 












6,832 




6,832 


42 


Salary 


6,832 




^ Ai A 
0,nlO 




0,410 


2.700 




2,700 


43 


Exponses 


3,000 




o 7nn 




O YAA 

2,700 




• 






TOiai riafDoimastor Buagec 


9 9,o92 


$ 


6,116 


$ 


6,116 










cMcKucNoT IMANAucMcnT 












1 1^04 








Diroctor 






1 nnn 




1,000 


2,970 




O OTA 


AC 

45 


Exponsds 


2,970 




1,250 




1 OCA 




• 






Total Emargoncy Mngtmt Budgat 


9 4,^99 


$ 


2,250 


9 


2,250 










WEIGHTS & MEASURES 












6.212 




5.000 


46 


Inspector 


5,000 




5,000 




5,000 


OO 




1 Ann 




Expenses 










■ 










Travel 
















4 AAA 
1,UUU 


AJ 
4# 


Tot&l Expenses 


CAA 




■ 






• 0,717 


* 


C AAA 




TOW weignrs & Measures suagei 


^ 0,000 


$ 


5,000 


$ 


S,000 


























inn 




siaianes 




$ 


100 


$ 


100 


$ 100 


$ 


100 




Total Constable Budget 


$ 100 


$ 


100 


$ 


100 










BUILDING DEPARTMENT 












66,044 




68,026 




Building Inspector 


70,067 




70,067 




70,067 


1,000 




20,720 




Local Inspector 


20,720 




10,000 




10.000 


20,720 




20,720 




Plumbing Inspector 


20,720 




20,720 




20,720 


20,720 




20,720 




Wire Inspector 


20,720 




20.720 




20,720 


- 




■ 




Fire Alarm Inspector 


- 




■ 




- 






1,000 




Assistant Electric Inspector 


1.000 




1,000 




1,000 


1 ,UUU 




i Ann 




I laTTic Ligni mspacior 












1,0UU 




•1 AAA 

1,000 




Assistant PlumbinQ inspactor 


4 AAA 

l.OUO 




4 nnn 
1 ,uuu 




1,000 


00, OOO 








Ctancal 


An onft 




40,906 




At\ OAA 

40,800 






40 000 




Touvn Planner 




















Other Compensation 


1,100 




1,100 




1,100 


144,369 




208,802 


49 


Total Salaries 


176,233 




ieo,oio 




160,619 


4,000 




5.500 




Pynanses 


6,000 




6 000 




A AAA 

o,00U 


100 




500 




Travel/Seminars 


1,000 




500 




500 


1 000 








mcUIII IVKIIilWIKIfKM? 












5,100 




6.000 


50 


Total Expenses 


f— 

7,000 




6,600 




a sofl 


$ 149,469 


$ 


214,802 




Total Building Budget 


$ 183,233 


$ 


172,013 


$ 


172,013 










CONSERVATION COMMISSION 














$ 


_ 


51 


Town Planner 


$ 11,250 


$ 


11,250 


$ 


11,250 


$ 720 


$ 


720 




Expenses 


$ 1,120 


$ 


1,120 


$ 


1,120 


$ 


$ 






Pnoftosional Develop/Memiiefshlps 


$ 800 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 


$ 720 


$ 


720 


S1A Total Expenses 


$ 1,920 


$ 


1,020 


« 


1,920 


1 720 


$ 


720 




Total Conservation Budget 


$ 13 170 


$ 


13,170 


$ 


13,170 










INSURANCE 












3,775,000 




4,058,125 




Employee Group-Health 


4,545,100 




4,425,000 




4,305,000 


300,000 




315,000 




Property & Casualty Insurance 


360,000 




345,000 




345,000 


$ 4,075,000 


$ 


4,373,125 


52 


Total Insurance Budget 


$ 4,905,100 


$ 


4,770,000 


$ 


4,650,000 


$ 9,356,965 


$ 10,102,048 




TOTAL PUBLIC PROTECTION 


$11,083,635 


$ 


10,568,561 


% 


10,448,561 



170 



Oepartmftnt Administrator Finance CommittM 









Annmn 


1^ 




Requested 


Recommended 




RAcommanded 




ri uo 




r I VI 


No. 






rT Oo 




rT oo 




FVOS 












n6ditn 3na oaniiation 
























flBAL 1 n uu'An 1 Men i 
















54,794 




DO, /4# 




neann wrncor 




56,288 




56,288 








18,750 




Oil's 




U^aWh kliir»A 

nvaiin NUrSO 




22 915 




19 893 




1 9,09O 




39,887 




40,176 




Clerical 




40 9nfi 








40,206 












AnimAl Control Officer's Salary 




10 000 




4 nnn 




5,000 












Other Compensation 




1,850 




1 850 




1,850 




114»04 1 




110|A«D 


90 


1 OIBI OalafiBS 




131,259 




123,237 












o,uuu 








AAA 
3,000 




2,500 
























: — 








2,500 




3,000 


54 


Total Expenses 




— 

3,000 




2,500 




2,600 




4,300 




4,300 


55 


Inspections and Tests 




4,300 




4.000 




4,000 




2,400 




2.400 


56 


Tests/State Charges 




2,400 




2,000 




2,000 












Animal Control Expenses 
























ACO Expenses 




1,500 




500 




AAA 
9UU 












Boarding Animals/Pound/Supplies 




1,500 




1,000 




1,000 










56A Subtotal Animal Control Expenses 




3,000 




1^500 




1,500 




832,900 




872.900 


57 


Rubbish and Recyctables Collections 




887,500 




887,500 




887,500 




966 631 








local neaiui Duogei 


« 


1 tk\A tMSk 
l,UO 1,499 


c 
♦ 


A n^ TtT 


* 


1 020 737 




966(631 




998,836 




TOTAL HEALTH AND SANITATION 


# 


1 031 4S9 


c 




s 

▼ 


1 020 737 












Public Works 
























WAGES • General 




































• 




7,500 




',900 




Part-Time Labor 




T c.nn 
/,9UU 




















Fish House Custodian 
















15,000 




15,000 




Overtime 




15 000 




7 500 




7,500 












Clothing Allowance 
















3,750 




3,750 




Police Details 




3 750 




3 750 




3,750 




1,103 




1,103 




Shift Differential 
























Other Compensation 
























Personnel 




440,771 




337,945 






$ 


433,368 


$ 


461,275 


58 


Total Salaries • General 


$ 


467,021 


$ 


349,195 


$ 


349,195 












EXPENSES - General 
















65,000 




65,000 




Operating Expenses & Supplies 




65,000 




65.000 




65,000 




10,000 




1 0,000 




Operating Expense Electric-Fish House 




10,000 




10,000 




10,000 








in AAA 




Operating Expense-Fish house 




10,000 




10,000 




in nnA 

1U,UUU 




c linn 








Communications 




5,500 




5,500 








36,500 




36,500 




Equipment Maintenance 




36,500 




36,500 




36,500 












Outside Services 
















19,900 




13,900 




Administration Building 




1^ snn 




10 CAA 




4 ^ CAA 

1 3,900 




3,200 




3,200 




Uniforms 




3,200 




3,200 




3,200 




143,700 




143,700 


59 


Expenses Subtotal 




143,700 




143,700 




143,700 




75,000 




75,000 


60 


Snow & Ice 




75,000 




75,000 




75!o00 




30,000 




30,000 


61 


Highway Maintenance 




30,000 




30,000 




30,000 


$ 


248,700 


$ 


248,700 




Total Expenses - General 


$ 


248,700 




248,700 


$ 


248,700 


$ 


682.068 


$ 


699,975 




Total Budget • D.P.W. General 


$ 


716,721 


$ 


597,895 


$ 


597,896 



171 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 



Approp. 




Approp. 


K. 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 


FVOS 




PC07 


No. 






pros 




Fr08 




FVOB 










WAGES • Sewer 














330,519 




327,537 




Personnel 




336,422 




301,811 




321,811 


27,000 




27,000 




Standby 




27,000 




27,000 




27,000 


5,000 




5,000 




Sewer Blocks 




5,000 




5,000 




5.000 










Meter Readers 




* 




" 




- 


o Ten 
3,(30 




3,790 




Police Details 




3,750 




3,750 




3,750 


6,000 




6,000 




Part-Time l_abor 




6,000 








* 


27,500 




27,500 




Overtime 




27,000 




31,500 




31,500 


Z — 








Other Compensation 








- 






$ 399,769 


% 


396,787 


62 


Total Salaries - Sewer 
EXPENSES • Sewer 


$ 


406,172 


$ 


369,061 


$ 


389,061 










Board Expenses 














8S 000 




85 000 




CintkrtMnn pynAnoAS A ^iinnliAQ 




ss nnn 




oc onn 

09,UUW 




ftS AAA 


15 000 




1 5^000 








•le nnr\ 

1 3,UUU 




i<i nnn 

1 3,UvlU 




15 000 


4 000 




4 000 




wUII II 1 lUI ilwalim 19 




A nnn 




A nnn 




A nnn 


3 000 




6 000 








A nnn 




A nnn 




ft nnn 


3 100 




3 100 




1 InifiM iim 




3 100 




1 100 




3 inn 


700,000 




750,000 




Lynn Sewer 




825,000 




825,000 




825,000 


810.100 




863,100 


63 


Expenses Subtotal 




938,100 




938,100 




938,100 






25,000 


64 


Sewer System Maintenance 












- 














25 000 










250 000 




275 000 




Indirect Cfists 




325!oOO 




325,000 




395 000 


17,500 




13,500 




Administration 




20,000 




17,500 




17.500 


52,818 




60,690 




Pension 




90 849 








90.842 


111 051 




109 225 




PrinnnAl 




A 1 1 flftV 




917 QAn 




217 940 


23,312 




18 445 




IntArfifit 

II IIOI v9( 




34,462 




34.462 




34,462 


4e4|6B1 




JTfi OCA 


05 


inoireci expenses ouDtoiai 




£AQ tAA 




686,744 




000,744 


$ 1,264,781 


$ 


1,389,960 




Total Expenses - Sewer 


$ 


1,661,344 


$ 


1,623,844 


$ 


1,623,844 


$ 1,664,550 


$ 


1,786,747 




Total Budget - Sewer Entrprlse Fund 
Funded by Sewer Revenue 
WAGES -Water 


$ 


2,056,516 


S 


1,992,905 


$ 


2,012,906 


275,145 




281,435 




Personnel 




285,981 




297,316 




317,316 


20,000 




20,000 




Standby 




27,000 




27,000 




27,000 


5,150 




5,150 




Flushing 




5,150 




5,150 




5,150 


8,240 




5,000 




Meter Readers 




* 




■ 




■ 


7,000 




7,000 




Police Details 




7,000 




7,000 




7,000 


5,000 




5,000 




Part-Time Labor 




5,000 










AM AAA 

20,000 




20,000 




Overtime 




20,000 




24,500 




24,500 


: — 








Other Compensation 




: — 








: — 


$ 340,635 


$ 


343,585 


66 


Total Salaries - Water 
EXPENSES - Water 


$ 


350,131 


$ 


360,966 


% 


380,966 










Board Expenses 














85 000 




85 000 




V^p^lOUII^ tA^^BI I9C9 Ul WU^^Il99 




85,000 




85 000 

WW( WWW 




85 OOO 


15,000 




15,000 




Equipment Maintenance 




15!oOO 




15 000 




15,000 


6,000 




6,000 




Communications 




6.000 




A nnn 




6,000 


3 000 




6 000 




Water Bills 




6,000 




ft nnn 

W|UUw 




6 000 


3,120 




3 120 




Uniforms 




3,120 




3 120 




3 120 


1,525,000 




4 coo 

1 ,002,392 




MWRA 




1,845,250 




•f oac oca 

1 ,845,250 




4 nnn 
1,385,000 


1,637,120 




1,797,512 


67 


Expenses Subtotal 




1,960,370 




1,960,370 




1,500,120 


- 




- 


68 


Water System Improvements * 












- 










* New 565k per year on an interest free state program 














25 000 


68A 


WATER RESERVE FUND 




25,000 










250,000 




275,000 




Indirect Costs 




325,000 




'^9*? nnn 




325,000 


45 649 




53 447 




Pension 




77,640 




77,640 




77 640 


564,148 




616,373 




Principal 




646,853 




646!853 




646,853 


78,773 




53,657 




Interest 




62.937 




62.937 




62,937 


938,570 




998,477 


69 


Indirect Expenses Subtotal 




1,112,430 




1,112,430 




1,112,430 


$ 2,575,690 


$ 


2,820,989 




Total Expenses - Water 


S 


3,097,800 


$ 


3,072,800 


$ 


2,612,550 


$ 2,916,225 


$ 


3,164,574 




Total Budget • Water Enterprise Fund 
Funded by Water Revenue 


$ 


3,447,931 


$ 


3,433,766 


$ 


2,993,516 


$ 4,680,775 


S 


4,951,321 




TOTAL WA1ER A SEWER BUDGET 


$ 


5,504,447 


$ 


6,426,671 


$ 


5,006^421 



172 



Oapartment Administrator Finance CommittM 
Apprep. Approp. It ■* ■ R*qu««t«d Recommanded Recommended 



Fr06 FVO? No. FVOB FVOS FTOS 













WAGES • Buildings & Grounds 
















3,000 




3,000 




Overtima 




3,000 




1,500 




1.500 




6,000 




6,000 




Part-Time Latw 




6,000 




- 








^ 1 A AAA 

132,326 




134,835 




Personnel 




1 34,379 




129,164 




128, 104 




■ 








Other Compensation 














$ 


141.326 


$ 


— 

143,835 


70 


Total Salaries - Buildings & Grounds 


$ 


143,379 


$ 


130,664 


$ 


130,664 












EXPENSES • Buildings & Grounds 
















- 




- 




Board Expenses 




- 




- 




• 




10,000 




10,000 




Operating Expenses & Supplies 




10,000 




10.000 




10,000 




7,000 




7,000 




Equipment Maintenance 




7,000 




7.000 




7,000 




1,000 




1,000 




Unitbrms 




1,000 




1.000 




1,000 


$ 


18,000 


$ 


18,000 


71 


Total Expenses - Buildings & Grounds 


$ 


18,000 


$ 


18,000 


$ 


18,000 


$ 


169,326 


$ 


161,835 




Total Budget - OPW Buildings & Grounds 


$ 


161,379 


$ 


148,664 


$ 


148,664 












SPECIAL ACCOUNTS 
















5,000 




4,000 




Shade Trees 




4,000 




4.000 




4,000 




25,000 




25,000 




Contract Work • trees 




25,000 




25,000 




25,000 




45,000 




50,000 




Contract Wort( - grass 




50,000 




50.000 




50,000 




13.000 




10.000 




Contract Patching 




10,000 




10.000 




10,000 




10,000 




10,000 




landscaping 




10,000 




10.000 




10,000 




30.000 








^fit >li lu 1 1 \ft/r>fV ■ifl^afrtlL'a /In/^liiHjM •i^K/v^l•\ 




Afi f\e\f\ 

4VI,UUU 




*H/.UWU 
















kooT uisposai 














$ 


128,000 


$ 


139,000 


72 


Total Budget • D.P.W. Special Accts. 


$ 


139,000 


$ 


139,000 


$ 


139,000 


$ 5,660,169 


$ 


6,962,131 




TOTAL PUBUC WORKS 


$ 


6,620,547 


$ 


6,312.230 


$ 


6,891,980 












KCWnCA 1 lUN 
























Coordinator 

\^WI will IdbWI 
















25.000 




25,750 




Director 




25,750 












50.000 




50,000 




Other Salaries 




50,000 




50.000 




35,000 




76,000 




76,760 


73 


Total Salaries 




75.750 




50,000 




35,000 




1.170 




1,170 




Office Expenses 




1,170 




1.000 




1,000 












Travel 
















7.600 




7,600 




Program Expenses 




7,600 




2.500 




2,500 




8,770 




8,770 


74 


Total Expenses 




8.770 




3,600 




3,500 


$ 


83,770 


$ 


84,620 




Total Recreation Budget 


$ 


84,520 


$ 


63,600 


$ 


38,500 



173 



Oapartment Administrator Flnanc* CommtttM 



Approp. 




Approp. 


It 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 


FVOfi 




FVO? 


No. 






FVOS 




FTOS 




FY'08 










COUNCIL ON AGING 














43,070 




44,363 




Oirector 




45,694 




45,694 




45,694 


14,832 




15.277 




Outreach Worker 




15,735 




15.735 




15,735 


12,360 




12,731 




Van Driver 




13,113 




13,113 




13,113 


70^62 




72,371 


75 


Total Salaries 




74,642 




74,542 




74,542 


11,500 




11,845 


76 


Program Coordinator 




12,200 




12,200 




12,200 


15.394 




16,000 


77 


Expenses 




27,600 




27,600 




27.600 


$ 97,166 


$ 


100,216 




Total Council on Aging Budget 


$ 


114,342 


$ 


114,342 


$ 


114,342 










VETERANS' SERVICE 














9,308 




9,308 


78 


Director's Salary 




9,308 




7.000 




9,308 


250 




250 




Office Expenses 












250 


1 500 




1 500 




ivioiiiuiiQii uay 








1 f^nn 

1 twUU 






450 




450 




Vaterans' Dav 




450 








450 


2,200 




2,200 


»8 


Total Expenses 




2,200 




2,200 




24!0O 


9,600 




9,OuO 


00 


Assistance 




5,800 




5.800 




5,800 


9 17,90o 


* 
• 


17,00S 




Total veteran • ouaget 


* 


•tV 4 AO 

17,308 


9 


4C AAA 
16,000 


* 


4V IAS 

17,908 










U«4iivlnM r^Al*4 

MalUnnCI U6DI 






















NON-SEWER DEBT SERVICE 


















O i7ft l%^fi 
^.1 f D.OOO 




rnnctpai 




3.461,078 




3.461,078 




3,401 .U/o 


284,228 




2,306,152 




Interest 




1 ,783.207 




1 ,783,207 




1,783,207 










Temporary Loans - Interest 


















1 no 70ft 

lU9.f oO 




weiuncauon 01 Noies/Donas 




50.000 




45,000 




4d,UU0 


• 








Contingent Appropriation 












■ 


$ 1,811,805 


$ 


4,692,488 


81 


Tot Budget-Non-Sewer Detit Serv. 


$ 


6,294,285 


$ 


5,289,286 


% 


6,289,286 










SEWER DEBT SERVICE 














950,438 




977,170 




Principal 




1 .004,491 




1,004,491 




1,004.491 


148,417 




131,395 




Interest 




113,227 




113,227 




113,227 


■ 








Administrative Fees/Charges 




9,524 




9,524 




9,524 


$ 1.098,866 


$ 


1,108,566 


82 


Total Budget - Sewer Detrt Service 


$ 


1,127,242 


$ 


1,127,242 


$ 


1,127,242 


$ 2,910,660 


$ 


5,701,053 




TOTAL MATURING DEBT 


$ 


6,421,527 


$ 


6,416,527 


$ 


6,416,827 










LIBRARY 














56,669 




60,109 




Director 




61,912 




61.912 




61,912 


40,773 




43,381 




Assistant Director 




44,682 




44.682 




44.682 


15,571 




16,492 




Secretary/Booklceeper 




17.287 




16.937 




16.937 


42,884 




43,742 




Children's Librarian 




44,556 




44,556 




44,556 


39,491 




40,281 




Circulation Librarian 




41.287 




41,287 




41.287 


43,922 




43,290 




Reference Librarian 




44,386 




44,386 




44.386 


24,827 




25.324 




Cataloger 




25,951 




23,592 




23,592 


19,974 




32.712 




Library Assistants 




35,251 




31,890 




31,890 


67,612 




50.242 




Adult Assistants (part-time) 




53.238 




34,328 




34,328 


11.716 




24.153 




AV Processors 




25.165 




19.612 




19.612 


4 nf\tt 
O.Uuo 




0,1U1 




Pages 




4 4 a4 
3,181 










1 U,OOJ 








^.^iiier womponsauon 




14,465 




13 500 






977,080 




390,o59 


o3 


1 otai oaianes 




411,370 




376,682 




983,eBZ 


1,500 




1,500 




Office Expenses 




1,500 




1.500 




1,500 


31,900 




31,900 




Building Expenses 




35,000 




35,000 




35,000 


400 




400 




Travel 




400 




400 




400 


33,800 




33,800 


84 


Total Expenses 




36,900 




36,900 




36,900 


107,991 




110,361 


85 


Library Materials 




117,300 




107.989 




110,989 


$ 618,871 


$ 


540,020 




Total Library Budget 




666,670 


$ 


521,571 


$ 


541,571 



174 



Department Admlnlstnrtor Finance Committee 
Approp. Approp. it Requested Recommended Recommended 





FY*07 


No. 




FVOS 








FY'08 








UNCLASSIFIED 












3,500 


3,500 


86 


Town Reports 


3,500 




3,500 




3.500 


27,500 


27,500 


87 


Telephones (most Depts.) 


29,500 




29,500 




29.500 


140,000 


145,000 


88 


Street Lighting 


145,000 




145.000 




145.000 


155,000 


155,000 


89 


Reserve Fund 


155.000 




128,000 




155.000 






QO 
9U 


Ai lAit 
MUUU 






AO ftArt 




AO rtrtA 


800 


800 


91 


Historical Commission 


800 




800 




800 




vVw,Ww 


9a 


nriQuibaiQ 1 CM 
















0^ 

90 


QtaKiliTatinn PiinH 

OUSUIIUdUUII r UIIU 












17A V\C\ 






1 InAmnloumAnf 

u fitfniynjyi 1 iwn 














1,592 


94 


Unpaid Bills 












$ 824^ 


$ 712,369 




Total Unclassified Budget 
Schools 


$ 790,800 


$ 


758,800 


$ 


800,800 


$ 136,000 


$ 239,023 


95 
96 


REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 
SCHOOLS - SWAMPSCOTT 


$ 254,023 


$ 


250,000 


$ 


275,400 


20,193,389 


20,768,380 




Total Budget 


23.039.825 




21,268,389 




21,443,389 








Less Anticipated Rev.-Nahant, Metco, ... 












$20,193,389 


$ 20,768,389 




Net Budget 


$23,039,825 


$ 


21,268,389 


$ 


21,443,389 


S20,329,389 


$ 21,007,412 




TOTAL SCHOOLS 


$23,293,848 


$ 


21,518,389 




21,718,789 


$44,633,925 


$ 49,496,170 




GRAND TOTAL BUDGET 


$54,510,580 


$ 


51,716,033 


$ 


51,425,491 



'Excludes Non Appropriated Expenses (i.e. State Assessments i Assessor^ Overlay) of $767,272 

Total Tom Budget Induding State Assessments and Assessor's Overlay and Net of Water/$ewer= $47, 186.342 



175 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will transfer $147,000 from the Assessor's Overlay 

Surplus Account of the Town to the account of Current Revenue to be used and applied by the 
Board of Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: These funds have been deemed surplus and can be used as a revenue 
source to balance the budget 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue 

Account of the Water Enterprise Fund to the account of Current Revenue the sum of $200,000 to 
be used and applied by the Board of Selectmen in the reduction of the water rate, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It 
results from the difference between estimates and actual receipts of water user fees and 
other revenues plus unexpended funds from the water departments budget. This is 
nomnally surplus revenue available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce rates for the 
coming year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue 

Account of the Sewer Enterprise Fund to the account of Current Revenue the sum of $150,000 to 
be used and applied by the Board of Selectmen in the reduction of the sewer rate, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It 
results from the difference between estimates and actual receipts of sewer user fees and 
other revenues plus unexpended funds from the sewer department's budget. This is 
normally surplus revenue available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce rates for the 
coming year. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to approve this Article. 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the 
Town Administrator to enter into a contract not to exceed to twenty-five years to lease the spaces 
on the second floor and lofts of the Swampscott Fish House, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Currently the Fish House second floor and lofts are leased to the 
Swampscott Yacht Club for a period of five years, with an option for a five year extension. 
This article would allow the Town to publicly procure a lease for a lease period not to 
exceed twenty five years creating stability for the occupant of the building. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



176 



ARTICLE 31 . To see if Town will vote to approve the Swampsoott Retirement Board's 
acceptance of the provisions of Section 2 Chapter 1 57 of the Acts of 2005, which provides a one- 
time payment to those members of the Swampscott Retirement System who retired for accidental 
disability and who are veterans, with said allowance to be equal to $15 per year, for a maximum 
of 20 years of service, not to exceed $300 in any calendar year, retroactive to the members' date 
of retirement, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by William Wollersheid, et al. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town IMeeting. 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management 

and control of the land formerly known as Temple Israel and located at 837 Humphrey Street, 
Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as; Map 29, lots 4 and 3A, from the Board 
of Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is cun-ently held to the Board of Selectmen for 
purposes of sale and to authorize the Chief Procurement Officer to sell the parcels of land at a 
minimum price of $3,350,000, per the provisions of Massachusetts General Law Chapter 30B, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This article provides the Selectmen and the Town Administrator the 
authority to sell the fomner Temple Israel building. 



The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management 

and control of the land fomnerly known as the Swampscott Middle School and located at 71 
Greenwood Avenue, Swampscott, identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as; Map 19, lot 87, 
from the Board of Selectmen for the purposes for which such land is currently held to the Board of 
Selectmen for purposes of sale and to authorize the Chief Procurement Officer to sell the parcel 
of land per the provisions of Massachusetts General Law Chapter 30B, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment This article provides the Selectmen and the Town Administrator the 
authority to sell the former Temple Israel building. 



The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise, by borrowing or 

otherwise, under any general or special law which authorizes the Town to raise money, by 
borrowing or otherwise, such sums of money as may be necessary for any and all of the 
purposes mentioned in the foregoing articles, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



177 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Wan-ant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hand this 1 1th day of April, 2007 




178 



APPENDIX A 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
POSITION CLASSIFICATION PLAN 
FOR EMPLOYEES 



Grade M16 

Police Chief 

Grade M15 

Town Administrator 

Grade M14 

Open 

Grade M13 

Fire Chief 

Grade M 12 

Town Accountant 
Director of Public Works (2) / 

Grade Mil 

Open 

Grade MIO 

Building Inspector 
Library Director 
Treasurer/Collector 
Assistant Engineer (2) J 

Grade M9 

Director of Information & Technology 
Health Director ^ 

Grade M8 

Town Clerk / 
Assistant Assessor V 
Personnel Manager (1) y/ 

Grade M7 

Open 

Grade M6 . 

Council on Aging Director *' 
Assistant Library Director ^ 
Town Planner y 

Grade MS / 

Assistant Town Accountant 
Assistant Treasurer 
Administratrve Assistant J 

Grade M4 

Assistant Personnel Manager •/ 

Grade M3 

Recreation Director 

Grade M2 

Open 

Grade Ml 
Open 



179 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
POSITION CLASSIFICATION PLAN 
FOR EMPLOYEES 

(Continued) 

Grade SI 

Plumbing/Gas Inspector 
Wiring Inspector ^ 
Local Building Inspector 
Municipal Hearing Officer / 
Veterans' Agent 
Harbormaster 
Appeals Board Secretary ^ 
Emergency Management Director \ 
Assistant Plumbmg Inspector 
Assistant Electrical Inspector j^t^ 
Planning Board Secretary 

Purchasing Agent n(v' 
Animal Control Officer ^ 



Grade H 

Outreach Worker 
Activities Coordinator 
COA Office Assistant / 

Van Driver 
Public Health Nurse J 
Library Pages 



180 



Town of Swampscott 
SALARY CLASSIFICATION PLAN FOR EMPLOYEES 
As of July 1, 2007(3% Increase) 



orauc 


iVllIl 


Mirl 

iVllU 




JYllO 






1 '^8 '?99 

1 JO,J77 


TVyf 1 ^ 


«1 (\A 04,0 




12S 817 


IV/fl A 




tlft-J 7QQ 


1 n 23S 


iVll J 






101 91 1 






*R84 078 


91 720 


Ml 1 

iVil 1 




$7S 669 


82 547 






^68 103 


74 294 


MQ 


721 


•561 292 


ftfi 865 


iVlO 






60 178 


IVl / 




^9 ^47 


S4 160 


JVIO 


<M ft Aon 


^44 (\9r> 


48 744 


MD 




t Aft oil 


4j,o07 


M4 


$32,901 


$36,192 


39,482 


m 


$29,611 


$32,573 


35,535 


M2 


$26,651 


$29,316 


31,980 


Ml 


$23,986 


$26,383 


28,783 



Notes for "M" classified positions: 

20% dififerential min to max, approximately 10% differential between grades 

(1) Salary Classification based on FTE salary for employees working less than full-time. 

(2) Salary Classification of Director of Public Works and Assistant Engineer is based on a forty 
(40) hour work week as opposed to all other "M" positions which are based on an thirty-four 
(34) hour work week. 



Grade 


Annual 


SI 


Compensation 


Plumbing/Gas Inspector 


$20,720 


Wiring Inspector 


$20,720 


Local Building Inspector 


$10,000 


Municipal Hearing Officer 


$2,500 


Veterans' Agent 


$9,308 


Harbormaster 


$3,416 


Parking Clerk 


$1,500 


Appeals Board Secretary 


$1,500 


Emergency Management Director 


$1,000 


Assistant Plumbing Inspector 


$1,000 


Assistant Electrical Inspector 


$1,000 


Planning Board Secretary 


$1,500 


Purchasing Agent 


$3,250 


Animal Control Officer 


$5,000 




181 



Town of Swampscott 
SALARY CLASSIFICATION PLAN FOR EMPLOYEES 

(Continued) 



Grade Min Mid Max 
H 

Activities Coordinator $10.93 $12.02 $13.21 

Outreach Worker ^ $15.89 $17.48 $19.23 

Van Driver J $12.89 $14.20 $15.63 

COA Office Assistant >/ $11.67 $12.83 $14.12 

Public Health Nurse $26.52 $29.17 $31.83 

Library Pages $7.43 $8.17 $8.98 



Notes for "H" classified positions 
20% dififerential min to max 



182 



Not having had sufBcient time to implement process changes yet, the CIC followed the 
historic approach in assessing the requests for FY2008. However, we felt that we should 
take a very conservative approach in approving requests, pending the finalization of the 
long- term program (the final recommendation made by the CIC for FY2008 will 
represent a decrease of $1,579,050 in tax supported improvements from the prior year). 

Therefore, the Swampscott Capital Improvement Committee respectfully submits its 
FY2008 report to the Swampscott Town Meeting. 

The CIC is currently required by the Town by-laws to: (1) study all proposed capital 
improvement projects for town meeting; (2) prepare a capital improvement budget for 
the next fiscal year; (3) prepare a five-year capital improvement plan; (4) report its 
findings and recommendations to the Finance Conmiittee; and (5) submit a report to the 
Swampscott Town Meeting regarding the Committee conclusions. The CIC reports that it 
has accomplished these goals, exclusive of the preparation of a five- year capital 
improvement plan. 

In order to develop a comprehensive five-year plan the CIC has begun to identify future 
infrastructure and equipment needs. Currentiy, the Town is awaiting an assessment of 
conditions for each of the buildings. Using this information coupled with the completed 
schools assessment, findings from the anticipated school master plan and through other 
means of research, it is our intention to develop a very comprehensive 5-10 year plan for 
presentation at the FY09 Town Meeting in 2008. It was deemed premature to develop 
that plan at this time based upon the current work at hand. 

Warrant Articles for FY2008 

The CIC received thirty-seven (37) articles that met the definition of a capital 
improvement for a total of $4,787,2 1 7. Each of the articles is defined to have a value of 
at least $20,000 and have a useful life of at least 3 years. The articles were each 
submitted by the Town Administrator or School Department. They were evaluated by 
CIC with respect to each other and with consideration of the town's capacity to fund. 

CIC Recommendations 

Table 1, attached, shows the articles recommended for approval by the upcoming Annual 
Town Meeting in the Warrant. The table represents the collective deliberations of the 
Committee. In our evaluation of articles, the CIC considered pre-existing criteria in 
selecting articles for approval, including the following: 

Public health and safety 

Legal requirement and potential liability 

Cost-effectiveness 

Grant/loan availabiUty 

Afiected number of users 

Aesthetic value 

Being part of a long-range plan 



183 



The committee recommends that 25 of the 37 articles submitted be approved for 
borrowing. The total of the recommended articles is $3,634,924 of which, $735,150 
would be supported by taxes. The remaining expenditures would be funded as follows: 

> $250,000 for the Stetson/Essex traffic improvements would be supported by a 
Chapter 122 state grant. 

> $190,000 for paving improvements would be funded by a state Chapter 90 grant. 

> $560,266 in water main work would be funded by an \fWRA interest free loan. 

> $ 1 ,400,000 in mandated sewer improvements to address overflows would be funded 
by a thirty-year low interest loan from a Department of Environmental Protection 
special revolving fund. 

> Previously approved and bonded capital articles will fund $499,508. These will be 
applied to expenditures of similar term. 

The CIC has a great deal of work ahead and we look forward to working with the 
residents, various Town Boards and Officials in developing a long term Capital 
Improvement Program that will serve the Town for the years to come. 



184 



OFSWAMPSCOTT (Table 1) 
AL IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE 

ARY OF CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR WARRANT ARTICLES FY08 

2007 







FY 08 


FUNDING BY 


OTHER FUNDING 




RequMt 


FY 08 REQUEST 


RECOMMENDED 


BOND/TAXES 


SOURCES 


COMMENTS 


mnwnded Projacts 












. DEPARTMENT 


















367,575 














$235,508 


Reprogrammed capital articles 


Door Hokjers/Auto Openers (Forrest Ave) 


25,000 


25,000 








icapped Assess Bathrooms (Forrest Avo) 


45,000 


45,000 








room renovations (Forrsst Ave) 


75,000 


75.000 








te Master Plan 


150,000 


150,000 








)r Door Replacement (Hadley) 


40,583 


40,583 








}lng Renovations (Clarice and Hadley) 


60,000 


60.000 








Ized Bleachers (Forrest Ave) 


30,000 


30,000 








ir Replacement 


90,560 











itos Abatement 1 (Clarice) 


92,500 


92,500 








stos Abatement (Stanley) 


25,000 


25.000 








Tile Replacement (Stanley) 


60,000 


60,000 








VM Replacement III (Ciarte) 


58,333 













ifl Lot Repairs 1 (Forrest Ave) 


142,500 













AL SCHOOL 


$894,476 


$603,083 


$367,575 


$235,508 




WENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 












g ( Chapter 90) 


190,000 


190,000 





$190,000 


Chapter 90 Grant 


ve Water Systems 


560,266 


560,266 





$560,266 


MWRA Loan 


ment- Bucket Tnjck 


50,000 


50,000 





$50,000 


Reprogrammed capital articles 


1 Signs 


25,000 








$0 




Ramp 


100,000 


94,000 





$94,000 


Reprogrammed capital articles 


round and Open Space Improvements 


50,000 


50.000 


50,000 


SO 




; Buildings Maintenance 


80,000 


80,000 


80.000 


$0 




r and Drain Design 


120,000 


120,000 





$120,000 


Reprogrammed capital articles 


Sewer Improvements 


1,400,000 


1,400,000 





$1 ,400,000 


SRF Low Interest Loan 


ALDPW 


$2,676,266 


$2,544,266 


$130,000 


$2,414,266 




DEPARTMENT 












ce Dispatch operations consoles 


$54,000 


$54,000 


$54,000 


$0 




1 Cruisers (2) 


$58,000 


$29,000 


$29,000 


$0 




ms Simulator 


$45,000 


$0 


$0 


$0 




lologv Upgrade 


$35,000 


$0 


$0 


$0 




AL Police 


$192,000 


$83,000 


$83,000 


$0 




PARTMENT 












er 


$400,000 


$0 


$0 


so 




'ehide 


$44,000 


$28,000 


$28,000 


$0 




1ty/0vert)ead Door 


$51,575 


$51,575 


$51,575 


so 




• Alarm Box Equipment 


$54,400 


$0 

^w 


$0 


$0 




ide Municipal Alarm System 


$35,500 


$0 


$0 


$0 




ALFIre 


$585,475 


$79,575 


$79,575 


so 




r 

iting 


$30 000 

<9vVf WWW 


SO 


SO 


so 

*** 




ENCY MANAGEMENT 












ment and Supplies 


$50,000 


$0 


$0 


so 




>LOGY 












ment upgrades and replacement 


$50,000 


$50,000 


$50,000 


$0 






$50,000 


$25,000 


$25,000 


$0 




'AL Technology 


$100,000 


$75,000 


$75,000 


$0 




moN 












on Playground Improvements 


$160,000 


$0 


SO 


$0 




yn (8 Essex Improvements 


$250,000 


$250,000 


$0 


$250,000 


Chapter 122 State Grant 


AL 


$4,837,217 


$3,634,924 


$735,150 


$2,899,774 





$3,634,924 



11 



APPENDIX F 



Unspent Articles for Re-use to Fund Capital Improvements 
Recommended in Article 9 



Fiscal Year Description 

2001 Fire Proof Trailer 

2001 School Window Shades 

2004 Fire Alarm Upgrade 

2006 Design Services SHS to SMS 

School Department 



Amount 

24,550.00 
38,205.00 
72,753.00 
100,000.00 

$ 235,508.00 



Fiscal Year 



Amount 



2002 Phillips Parking Lot Paving 

2006 Chassis Sander 

2004 Water Meter Replacement 

2007 Phillips Park Imp. Design 
Department of Public Worlcs 



94,000.00 
20,906.00 
70,426.00 
78,668.00 



$ 264,000.00 



Grand Total 



$ 499,508.00 



186